Charles Taylor

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For 367 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Charles Taylor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 The Pianist
Lowest review score: 0 Enough
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 96 out of 367
367 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Manages to be entertaining and reasonably exciting. Scott's style may be slick and tricky but, if this and his last film, "Enemy of the State," are any indication, he's lost the glossy sadism that characterized his previous work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    When the camera is floating up high, as the band practices its moves on the field, you can imagine Busby Berkeley watching somewhere, jealous that he never got his mitts on a marching band.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    If there were any justice in the world, The Cat's Meow would be the beginning of the rehabilitation of Davies' image.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    The good-natured silliness of it all kept me laughing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    In some ways it's not a very good movie... tries to mix comedy and tragedy...but the movie has an exciting subject -- a true story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Ricci's Wendy captures the volatile combination of aggressiveness and uncertainty in a young woman trying to come to terms with her sexuality like no performance since Emily Lloyd's in "Wish You Were Here." It's a very different performance, quieter, harder and yet more vulnerable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    In "Buffalo 66," Gallo was an unfunny prankster. In The Brown Bunny, wearing his heart on his sleeve, he's a real filmmaker.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Delightful screwball comedy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    With Love and Death on Long Island, writer-director Richard Kwietniowski makes a very pleasing feature debut.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Not a great movie, but its daring and seriousness, its refusal to take refuge in the sort of irony that diminishes whatever it touches, its willingness to risk ludicrousness, may be elements that are necessary to achieve greatness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    A movie comedy that manages to be consistently funny without becoming assaultive, and that remains consistently sweet-tempered even at its most macabre, isn't so common that we can refuse this one's modest pleasures.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Lets you indulge your taste for soapy heartache without leaving you feeling that you have to wash the bubbles out of your mouth.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    As much as Eastwood ever expresses pleasure about anything, you sense a flicker of gratification that he can work with actors who can hold their own against him. Lifford does it without breaking a sweat. Howard Hawks would have loved her.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    It's an awfully enjoyable, hip little B-movie.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Lightweight but delightful martial-arts romp.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Mirkin hits just the right note between naughty and raunchy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    When We Were Kings, which was put together by Taylor Hackford and Leon Gast, is a patchy movie that fails to rise to the grace and articulation of its main attraction. But it has Ali, and when he's on-screen, that's enough.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Has a solid farce structure, a bunch of ripe second bananas, and two sinfully attractive stars ready to raise comic hell. So why is a movie with so many genuine laughs and so many good bits only fitfully amusing? The short answer is that the Coen brothers seem to be incapable of trusting their material.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    As events in Mr. Jealousy grow more entangled, there is no corresponding escalation in the pace of the movie, and Baumbach misses out on some laughs...But Mr. Jealousy is one of those movies where the less assured passages are a good sign, the mark of a director trying something new.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    The only romantic comedy in quite a while that acknowledges, even celebrates, the fact that love and sex are emotional anarchy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Potente pumps strong and true from the first frame to the last.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    It's a nice movie. But Disney has never learned that "nice," especially in comedy, is a negative virtue.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    There's a combination of fatalism and hard-edged humor at work in The Sea Inside that you can imagine Irish writers would feel right at home with.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    A trifle but an exceptionally civilized, charming trifle.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Southern Gothic lite -- with a bite.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Moore, who may be the most unpredictably talented actress in movies right now, plays Amber with an inseparable mixture of maternal feeling and lust that's flabbergasting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    It's tough not to respond to the visual cleverness of Pleasantville.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    It must be hard to misread the tone of a book as single-minded as Patricia Highsmith's The Talented Mr. Ripley, but Anthony Minghella manages somehow.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    Offers the most intense visual experience I've had at the movies all year.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Charles Taylor
    For everything wrong with it, A.I. is not a dismissible film. It's too richly imagined, too accomplished. Even as he botches the emotions and the issues he raises, Spielberg goes headlong into them, wrestles with the picture's conflicting impulses. It's the kind of screw-up you get only from a master filmmaker.

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