For 125 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 23% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chris Cabin's Scores

Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Hannibal: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Sharknado 4: The 4th Awakens
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 59 out of 125
  2. Negative: 28 out of 125
125 tv reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    The show could benefit hugely from creating more of a hash out of this immediately fascinating and largely unsparing world. As it stands, however, Crashing remains fixated on a single proverbial wet noodle, seemingly unaware that wet noodles tend to be a lot more satisfying in groups.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Cleverman works up to a point, but the failure of the show’s creative team to build upon the promise of its conceit and its underlying ideas leaves a sour taste in one’s mouth.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    What is missing from Dice is more of these scenes, more moments where its clear that Clay isn’t the alpha-male vulgarian that he’s been playing on stage and on screen for most of his career. There’s not enough challenging of his machismo, outside of the age-old routine of Carmen being the sensible one and he being the foolish male, but that hardly counts as a moment of genuine reflection on the comedian’s part.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Though the series remains entertaining, attractively moody, and sensationally well-acted, there’s a lack of urgency and personal import that can be felt throughout that keeps this inarguably good show from being a great one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Stranger Things ends up being an entertaining and impassioned throwback to the time when friendly aliens were all the craze, but there’s a consistent sense that a far more imaginative and daring series hiding behind the monsters, whether they be human or otherwise.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Fear the Walking Dead often feels as adrift as its characters, seeking tonal stability and a richer sense of character in the same way our crew is frantically looking for a place to call home and survivors to band together with while they’re both literally and proverbially lost at sea.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Can great art be fun, intelligent, and non-indulgent all at once? Documentary Now makes a solid case that it could very well be a comedy series that fits that bill, but the series’ ambitions remain just a bit too hit-and-miss to fully realize that promise.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Archer is consistently in the moment and garners many of its still plentiful laughs by focusing on the immediacy of the world that Reed has created, a world where a former spy and new father can find himself fighting terminators and robbing high-scale L.A. lawyers while also tangling with Oedipal urges and an ego that, after seven seasons, isn’t even close to settling down.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    If the show isn’t nearly as funny in the first two episodes of Season 4 as the excellent third season, it’s only because the entire cast isn’t together, volleying potent guffaws. For the most part, however, the comedy series feels the same while making minor changes in each episode.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    What truly sets the series apart from similar narratives, however, is its narrative breadth, its not entirely successful but nevertheless enthralling scope in detailing the world of the pre-Lincoln south, from the white men and women who rose to power by enslaving persecuting, and, yes, killing African-Americans to those African-Americans who sacrificed, in every imaginable way, to survive the times.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    The drama grows more plainly mature in the last few volumes, but the sheer amount of what Lance Black and the creative team are biting off here ends up limiting just how knowledgeable, sincere, and convincing the series comes off as.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The cast is so uniformly excellent that one's seduced into following the narrative despite the show's rather glaring narrative flaws.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Where Bourdain and Melville go to painstaking lengths to describe the addictions, hardships, and unending effort that went into the toils at the center of their tales, Feed the Beast only expresses a basic admiration for the process and love for the end product, which makes [creator Clyde] Phillips's perspective feel more like that of a hungry customer than of a relentless artist in the kitchen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Babylon wants to both mock the no-bull crassness of political wheelers and dealers and cling to a moralistic view of government, and the writers fail to find cohesion between these two perspectives more times than not. As a result, the humor often feels dulled by the relevancy of the subject matter, and the politics come off as both self-serious and frivolous.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Even in its tense, involving conclusion, the final season of The Killing conjures nothing so much as a more compact recitation of its mundane pessimism, still incapable of shaking the humdrum drama and redundant thrills that forced the series to find a new home in the first place.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Though the series continues to be handsomely lensed and sports perceptive, complex performances from Sheen and Caplan, the writers hesitate to take chances outside of this established dichotomy between the reserved visual style and the frank, open discussions about sex.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Ironically mirroring Dexter's strict adherence to Vogel and Harry's carefully drawn guidelines, the series abides by a strict set of narrative routines that it only marginally alters in the hopes of replicating the wild success and catharsis of its inaugural season again and again.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    As it stands, the series is stuck in neutral, between caring about what happens to these people and wanting to see them tear each other to shreds for sport.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    For all the agility on display in Into the Badlands, the series feels narratively uncertain, stuck between the simple pleasures of genre staples and the sadly unfulfilled aspiration toward a more imaginative, substantive work of stylized fantasy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    There's an intermittently engaging trashiness to this season of True Detective, but the overall production feels overbearingly self-serious, though not in any self-aware way that would excuse the entire death-drunk schematics Pizzolatto has designed here.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The series ultimately feels like a nostalgia trip, less for the era in which it's set than for the original film that spawned it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    If Daniels had put more emphasis on the polish of his artifice and gave the show’s aesthetic the same bombast that it’s tawdry, openly cheesy dialogue gives the story, Star might have proven to be a subversive, infuriated series. It’s overall look, however, is more chintzy than anything else, wrecked with soft focus and lazy, unconvincing you-are-there camerawork.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The show ultimately feels like a kind of meager mechanism, fine-tuned to deliver jolts, laughs, and maybe even tears, which is the exact opposite of who Dobesh is in the pages of Crouch’s books.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The problem here is the writing, which consistently feels belabored and overtly complicated while the show itself remains largely just about Dirk and Todd and their adventures.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    All The Way is passable, even lively at moments, but it’s also calcified by its repetitive, bloated discussions about the rights and wrongs of the civil rights movement and, more importantly, the two-party system of American government. The best lines go to Cranston, who clearly relishes the language, candor, and physicality of his character in every frame in which he appears, but beyond him, there’s no real sense of the conflictive character that denotes these real-life figures.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The talent involved is enough to ensure that Comedy Central’s latest is vaguely amusing, but Idiotsitter should have been more riotous than amiable, more uniquely ruthless than blandly juvenile.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    Unfortunately, the truth of the matter is that Shades of Blue has no shading in character or story, and is more interested in reiterating transposed views of family values than dealing with the tough and often very ugly subject matter it purports to confront.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    Not for nothing does Animals similarly feel like a series of vague, mildly surreal takes on life events and actions, all of which are alternatively carelessly sarcastic in tone or lacking in the wild pulse of life that denotes the existence of animals big and small, rather than a studied approximation of just such things.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    Even great casts have their limits, and in the case of Goliath, they give this shaggy drama just enough electricity to keep interest without offering a genuine reason to care about what’s going on episode to episode.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    In following a case-of-the-week format with the series, the show must rely on its level of technical nuance and the wit of its characters, and Bull doesn’t let anyone but Weatherly really stand out.

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