For 27 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chris Cabin's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 4
Lowest review score: 12 Partners (2014): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 27
  2. Negative: 6 out of 27
27 tv reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Cabin
    Despite the formidable technical mastery applied and the demanding sprawl of the multifaceted narrative, Campion's series has the unmistakable timbre of daring art made naturally.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Cabin
    Even if the radiant humor occasionally tends a bit toward the local, as in the brilliant season opening involving members of the DSNY, the point of view is so effortlessly relatable in its humble assertions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Behind the Candelabra is powerful, funny, and emotionally rigorous, and though it might act as a fiery and forceful resignation, in conjunction with Side Effects, it also serves as an uncommonly heartfelt Dear John letter.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    The Walking Dead never feels as if it's just creating new obstacles to make these characters squirm. Indeed, what makes the series so consistently fascinating beyond its horrific thrills is a sense of rebuilding life down to the little details, which brings us to the latter song in "Infected."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Treme imparts a feeling, however small in scope, of real transformation in the Crescent City, but it comes with an insensitivity toward the city's traditions.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    The show's characters, whether major or minor, skirt familiar archetypes, but the writing and performances consistently subvert accepted lowlife caricatures, finding something less pointedly foreboding than odd and irrefutably human in Harlan County's heroes and villains.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Doll & Em turns out to be unerringly fair-minded in its view of popular filmmaking, if only because concerns about Hollywood's shallowness are secondary to ideas of age and, inevitably, death.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    In its fourth season, Game of Thrones finally strides with the purpose and fearlessness of a great battle-tested behemoth through the sprawling, violent landscapes of Westeros.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Enoch clearly loves the drink, and enjoys the bad work he does, and the final season of Boardwalk Empire suggests that no matter what cloaking his ilk partially hid under, it's nothing compared to the whitewashing that's about to come.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Mr. Dynamite may finally be Gibney's most psychologically and socially perceptive film to date, at once a refreshingly even-handed view of one of the great musical minds of the 20th century and a near-pathological study of the rise of modern conservative thinking, seen through one of it's most unlikely yet dynamic supporters.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    What's most remarkable about Bob's Burgers is how improbably poignant it can be while shamelessly indulging in the peculiar environs and dreamscapes that emerge from small-town livin'.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    It's in the relationships that these men come home to that defines Inside Men as markedly more engaging and effective than a great deal of its ilk.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    If Game of Thrones still feels like it's just a bit weighed down by the sheer heft of its narrative strands, to say nothing of the seemingly endless backstories and mythologies, the series at least now feels like it has some firm footing and a newfound sense of certain direction that was lacking intermittently in the second season.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    It's effective, finely realized genre work from a notoriously dark and idiosyncratic director and it speaks directly to the show's reenergized interest in exuding its own distinct personality.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    At its wildest moments, the series feels as frighteningly nervy and furious in its delivery and intent as prime David Lynch. More times than not, however, it defers to an earnest, rote view of bad religion, only marginally enlivened by the appearance of Shea Whigham as a big-tent preacher.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Jordan favors intimacy in his shooting; he prefers discussions behind closed doors or hidden in plain sight and affairs built on whispers of secrets. This visual tendency blunts the sharp edge of the series, as does his understandable but limiting focus on the eponymous family.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    With little exception, MacMillan is the sole character given scenes that seek to bring out his antic inner life, the most memorable of which being his meltdown in an electronics store, where he tries to find a hold of his ambition in a torrent of comingled rhythms emanating from various speakers.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Masters of Sex remains passingly enjoyable, thanks largely to the cast, including Caitlin FitzGerald, Keke Palmer, and Allison Janney, all of whom help to refocus the series on the crucial role of women in sexual and scientific exploration.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The cast is so uniformly excellent that one's seduced into following the narrative despite the show's rather glaring narrative flaws.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Ironically mirroring Dexter's strict adherence to Vogel and Harry's carefully drawn guidelines, the series abides by a strict set of narrative routines that it only marginally alters in the hopes of replicating the wild success and catharsis of its inaugural season again and again.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Even in its tense, involving conclusion, the final season of The Killing conjures nothing so much as a more compact recitation of its mundane pessimism, still incapable of shaking the humdrum drama and redundant thrills that forced the series to find a new home in the first place.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The Mindy Project is far more interested in the worn-out comic agenda of a smart, independent woman hamstrung by her obsession with finding commitment with a man than it is in self-excoriation or the unique proclivities of a chosen community.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Unlike Law & Order, Chicago P.D. doesn't possess a crucial shagginess, a sense of experience and knowledge in these supposedly weary and seasoned characters that cuts through the hardened cynicism of the show's atmosphere.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    Underneath the shallow brooding, everything feels like build-up to a massive climactic event, every maneuver directed, written, and acted as if it were yet another crucial move toward some terribly violent, bad end. The tactic is meant to drum up suspense, which it doesn't do particularly well, and the series loses any sense of humanity, shirking the very pulse of life the titular vampire hungers for.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The Following similarly takes one of the oldest genre conceits in the book, strips away all manner of personal detail, gallows humor, and the genuinely grotesque, and tries to sell what remains as horrifying instead of plainly sadistic.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The turns of the convoluted plot and the thick-as-a-brick backstories of the largely dull, undetailed characters are all that seem to matter to the show's writers.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    Partners is bad even by most lawyer-joke standards, and the writing's falseness and laziness carries over to the performances.