For 133 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 22% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 73% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chris Cabin's Scores

Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Hannibal: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Sharknado 4: The 4th Awakens
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 61 out of 133
  2. Negative: 30 out of 133
133 tv reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Cabin
    Despite the formidable technical mastery applied and the demanding sprawl of the multifaceted narrative, Campion's series has the unmistakable timbre of daring art made naturally.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Cabin
    Season three of Hannibal wanders off into dark, unexpected territory in Italy, remaining even more incisively and ambitiously written than the last season, and sporting the most radically expressive imagery currently on television.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Cabin
    Even if the radiant humor occasionally tends a bit toward the local, as in the brilliant season opening involving members of the DSNY, the point of view is so effortlessly relatable in its humble assertions.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    The turmoil of such [relationship] arrangements, the anxiety and surprising limitations of being personally unbound by societal norms, has been a key part of Louie's inimitable perspective since its inception; here this anxiousness stirs up new perspectives on Louie's ability to forgive and his unique style of courting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Like the excellent fourth season of Homeland, season five suggests a politically wise and deeply skeptical update of John le Carré's very best spy-centric work, seeing the fury, confusion, and accepted hypocrisy of international diplomacy with the same clarity as the lies and duplicitous acts the show's characters indulge in on a regular basis.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Behind the Candelabra is powerful, funny, and emotionally rigorous, and though it might act as a fiery and forceful resignation, in conjunction with Side Effects, it also serves as an uncommonly heartfelt Dear John letter.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    The unforeseeable effects and ostensible curse of murdering have always proved key to the show's tension, and as the story continues to build a kinetic rhythm and streamline the drama, the thunderous chaos stirred up by each life taken resonates all the more loudly.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Enoch clearly loves the drink, and enjoys the bad work he does, and the final season of Boardwalk Empire suggests that no matter what cloaking his ilk partially hid under, it's nothing compared to the whitewashing that's about to come.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Treme imparts a feeling, however small in scope, of real transformation in the Crescent City, but it comes with an insensitivity toward the city's traditions.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Soderbergh has found a brand new canvas to test out visual ideas and off-kilter storytelling devices, and The Knick‘s intoxicating second season proves to be a dazzlingly detailed and vibrantly visual mural of his obsessions, bringing on a sort of imagistic high that would count as the famed filmmaker’s most obvious addiction.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Mr. Dynamite may finally be Gibney's most psychologically and socially perceptive film to date, at once a refreshingly even-handed view of one of the great musical minds of the 20th century and a near-pathological study of the rise of modern conservative thinking, seen through one of it's most unlikely yet dynamic supporters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    The show's characters, whether major or minor, skirt familiar archetypes, but the writing and performances consistently subvert accepted lowlife caricatures, finding something less pointedly foreboding than odd and irrefutably human in Harlan County's heroes and villains.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Doll & Em turns out to be unerringly fair-minded in its view of popular filmmaking, if only because concerns about Hollywood's shallowness are secondary to ideas of age and, inevitably, death.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    The Walking Dead never feels as if it's just creating new obstacles to make these characters squirm. Indeed, what makes the series so consistently fascinating beyond its horrific thrills is a sense of rebuilding life down to the little details, which brings us to the latter song in "Infected."
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Working with a uniformly subtle and expressive cast of players, the writers sneak in small, unassuming truths about family life and the benefits of modulated pride.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    Silicon Valley, then, may end up being recognized as Judge's magnum opus in this sense--a complicated, heartfelt, and intensely uproarious articulation of the struggle to freely realize one's creative yearnings, whether in business, technology, or art.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    In its fourth season, Game of Thrones finally strides with the purpose and fearlessness of a great battle-tested behemoth through the sprawling, violent landscapes of Westeros.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    Bringing back his most iconic creation in Campbell felt faintly self-reflexive for Raimi in the first season of Ash vs Evil Dead, but in Season 2, that personal, almost confessional element feels more sturdily at the center of the action and the series feels infinitely more galvanized for that.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    With so much talent at hand, from the performances to the direction to the editing, The Last Panthers ends up making the familiar feel fresh, allowing the equally thrilling and melancholic subject matter to unfurl with surprising effectiveness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    Halt and Catch Fire finally seems to know how to fluidly move from one proverbial decibel to the next, all in the hope of finding a place where you feel comfortable being yourself.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    BoJack Horseman ends up becoming a thrilling, rueful study of the psychological games and uniquely vain, notably capitalistic decision-making that powers the entertainment industry. And yet, through its venomous jokes and unrelenting, uproarious gags, the series also recognizes how charming, joyful, and galvanizing entertainment for entertainment sake can be, no matter how stupid or silly it may seem.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    Insecure comes off as insightful, witty, and sincerely delightful, even as its narrative backbone is formed by tremendous philosophical concepts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    When more and more possessions begin to pop up in Rome, a series of events that Kyle believes is directly related to him, he is partnered with a priest, Reverend Anderson (Philip Glenister), and the series becomes an equally fascinating contemplation of the basic usage and worth of religion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    Fans of “Hollywood Babylon” and the city’s unending gossip will no doubt find plenty to love in FEUD, but it’s in its rambunctious and often quite critical depiction of La La Land and the deeply troubling things that it asks of women (and, occasionally, men) that the series finds its melodious yet unpredictable rhythm.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    Daredevil, like the similarly sensational Jessica Jones, feels like a show that is constantly evolving, and consistently searching for challenges.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    Humans may lack the visual pizazz or expressive symbolism to bring its bigger ideas into greater relief, but it’s becalmed yet thoughtful aesthetic actually works perfectly in tune with its subtext.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    The whole thing may seem patently ludicrous but it’s done with distinct artistic finesse, set to a furious, insidious visual rhythm in it’s bold, decisive, and intuitive editing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    The Girlfriend Experience is an intoxicating, provocative, and staggeringly sexy consideration of the illusion of intimacy as compared against whatever real intimacy is, as the title suggests.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    What the series lacks in knowing visual style it more than compensates with its witty, lacerating writing and its continuously inventive and moving cast.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    That Guerrilla makes this point so clear without feeling as if we’re in the pews is triumph enough. The fact that the Showtime series ends up such an increasingly addictive watch is an unforeseen but welcome bonus.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    The cumulative charm of this exhilarating comedy is owed to the no-bullshit demeanor has both carefully constructed over the years and yet seems to be always poking a sharp stick at.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    There’s a potent anger within the luminous world that DuVernay has created here, and yet the series moves with a grace that is unique to its creators’ empathy, curiosity, and devastating intellect.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    The inspired, raucous third season of Broad City evokes a deep love for the five boroughs by at once trashing the place and its denizens, while also perfectly encapsulating the tremendous freedom and promise that the city offers young, creative women who are simply looking for a place to find and be their own unapologetic selves.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    Throughout the second season of this wildly funny and joyous series, Kimmy comes to embody a full knowledge of the power of being kind and helpful, even when people don’t deserve such aid or the world convinces you that such acts are negligible in the face of wide-scale murder, rampant bigotry, and worldwide corruption.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Cabin
    30 for 30 has never endeavored to create anything quite as thoroughly addictive and interesting as O.J.: Made in America, Ezra Edelman‘s expansive study of Orenthal James Simpson and the murder of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    At its wildest moments, the series feels as frighteningly nervy and furious in its delivery and intent as prime David Lynch. More times than not, however, it defers to an earnest, rote view of bad religion, only marginally enlivened by the appearance of Shea Whigham as a big-tent preacher.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    What started as a refreshingly female-centric yet awkward comedy has grown into a strange and oddly mature study of how Hannah and her ilk come to terms with the labor that goes into art after years of fantasizing about the façades and lifestyles of bohemian artists.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Daredevil's story does get a bit repetitive at times, but is broken up by an increasingly broad swath of subplots.... Though [show creator] Goddard never lets the cynicism of this world override the joy and wonder of Daredevil, it's clear that he's spoiling for a good fight.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Better Call Saul is a nifty and promising comic noir, but it also allows you to ponder certain missed opportunities.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    What's most remarkable about Bob's Burgers is how improbably poignant it can be while shamelessly indulging in the peculiar environs and dreamscapes that emerge from small-town livin'.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    If the insights into modern existence on Portlandia never seem quite as profound as those on Louie, the series continues to brandish a view of gender that's almost casually radical.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    The amiable, unlikely empathy and neuroses that separate the members of the Pied Piper family from the pack are the same elements that give this gleefully sardonic comedy its distinct, bittersweet tone.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    The series is one of the more emotionally complex and intermittently bleak Marvel adaptations to date, a kind of melodrama about the fight for self-assurance and personal strength in the wake of immense psychological abuse.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    It's effective, finely realized genre work from a notoriously dark and idiosyncratic director and it speaks directly to the show's reenergized interest in exuding its own distinct personality.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    If Game of Thrones still feels like it's just a bit weighed down by the sheer heft of its narrative strands, to say nothing of the seemingly endless backstories and mythologies, the series at least now feels like it has some firm footing and a newfound sense of certain direction that was lacking intermittently in the second season.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Hardy's showmanship is nearly matched by many of his costars, particularly Jonathan Pryce as the head of the villainous East India Company, a prototype for the corporatization currently eating this world alive. ... Yet, there's something conventionally nagging about Taboo: The series never entirely tumbles down the rabbit hole with its characters into the mouth of chaos and madness, as the best expressionist TV shows do.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    What's ultimately so refreshing and thrilling about Ash vs. Evil Dead, whose premiere episode is helmed by Raimi, is how charmingly and giddily scrappy it feels, in both narrative and aesthetic, and the zooming, seemingly effortless pace at which Raimi keeps the bloody, widespread mayhem going.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    It's in the relationships that these men come home to that defines Inside Men as markedly more engaging and effective than a great deal of its ilk.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    More times than not, this loving obsession with the details of lower-middle-income life makes up for the show's competent but overly plain production design and cinematography. Even more so, the show's symbology is often breathtakingly simple yet resonant.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Vice Principals is the story of an unlikely partnership, and Goggins and McBride prove deliriously entertaining in evoking Neal and Lee's rocky relationship and oft-guarded passions.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    In its second season, Mark and Jay Duplass's Togetherness blooms into a stirring study of modern parenting as an experiment in creation and imagination.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Luke Cage succeeds where so many Marvel ventures have failed in finding a unique, if not perfect, pitch between seeing the hero at its center as an icon for social good and understanding him as a human being, and it's important that the writers don't ignore or sublimate the fact that he's also African American.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Where the second season ultimately improves on the first is mainly in its sense of scope, of extending the already vibrant existing world of the series.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Despite even their most reckless actions, the remaining Rayburn family struggles and strives to keep up appearances alongside [Kyle Chandler's John], and Bloodline similarly feels the need to stress the maturity of its characters and the seriousness of their situation. In doing this, the creators fail to fully survey the storm of feral impulses hiding beneath the postcard image of both the Florida Keys and one of its supposedly most celebrated families.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    House of Cards is at its best when investigating the uneasy balance of studied, built-up political performance and personal dogmas, obsessions, gripes, and fears, but as many of these masks begin to give way in the story, the series noticeably struggles to keep up its addictive tension.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    With little exception, MacMillan is the sole character given scenes that seek to bring out his antic inner life, the most memorable of which being his meltdown in an electronics store, where he tries to find a hold of his ambition in a torrent of comingled rhythms emanating from various speakers.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Portlandia has always smartly shown how relationships built on emotional closeness are more sustainable and fulfilling, and ultimately the ease, comfort, and intimacy of the original relationship here wins out. The series is less successful in its depiction of the young and hip as airheads.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Jordan favors intimacy in his shooting; he prefers discussions behind closed doors or hidden in plain sight and affairs built on whispers of secrets. This visual tendency blunts the sharp edge of the series, as does his understandable but limiting focus on the eponymous family.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    To watch them [McKellan and Hopkins] share in their characters' history and intimacy, or intermittently dig underneath each other's skin through those very means, renders The Dresser an effective portrait of the pitfalls and pleasures of a working relationship, but it's a missed opportunity for a more full-bodied look at the life of a theater, and the toils and passion of all those involved.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Overall, it's a convincing enough portrait of the absurdity of modern American politics. But it's exactly this authenticity that makes the contemptuous characters feel aggravatingly one-note in comparison.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Masters of Sex remains passingly enjoyable, thanks largely to the cast, including Caitlin FitzGerald, Keke Palmer, and Allison Janney, all of whom help to refocus the series on the crucial role of women in sexual and scientific exploration.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Ultimately, Love feels stuck between a premise that would have worked much better as an extended film, an intimate vision of a young Apatow breaking into the TV world, and the by-the-numbers structure of a sitcom with a few flashes of genuine originality.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    The show could benefit hugely from creating more of a hash out of this immediately fascinating and largely unsparing world. As it stands, however, Crashing remains fixated on a single proverbial wet noodle, seemingly unaware that wet noodles tend to be a lot more satisfying in groups.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Cleverman works up to a point, but the failure of the show’s creative team to build upon the promise of its conceit and its underlying ideas leaves a sour taste in one’s mouth.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    What is missing from Dice is more of these scenes, more moments where its clear that Clay isn’t the alpha-male vulgarian that he’s been playing on stage and on screen for most of his career. There’s not enough challenging of his machismo, outside of the age-old routine of Carmen being the sensible one and he being the foolish male, but that hardly counts as a moment of genuine reflection on the comedian’s part.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Though the series remains entertaining, attractively moody, and sensationally well-acted, there’s a lack of urgency and personal import that can be felt throughout that keeps this inarguably good show from being a great one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Stranger Things ends up being an entertaining and impassioned throwback to the time when friendly aliens were all the craze, but there’s a consistent sense that a far more imaginative and daring series hiding behind the monsters, whether they be human or otherwise.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Fear the Walking Dead often feels as adrift as its characters, seeking tonal stability and a richer sense of character in the same way our crew is frantically looking for a place to call home and survivors to band together with while they’re both literally and proverbially lost at sea.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Can great art be fun, intelligent, and non-indulgent all at once? Documentary Now makes a solid case that it could very well be a comedy series that fits that bill, but the series’ ambitions remain just a bit too hit-and-miss to fully realize that promise.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    Archer is consistently in the moment and garners many of its still plentiful laughs by focusing on the immediacy of the world that Reed has created, a world where a former spy and new father can find himself fighting terminators and robbing high-scale L.A. lawyers while also tangling with Oedipal urges and an ego that, after seven seasons, isn’t even close to settling down.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    If the show isn’t nearly as funny in the first two episodes of Season 4 as the excellent third season, it’s only because the entire cast isn’t together, volleying potent guffaws. For the most part, however, the comedy series feels the same while making minor changes in each episode.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    What truly sets the series apart from similar narratives, however, is its narrative breadth, its not entirely successful but nevertheless enthralling scope in detailing the world of the pre-Lincoln south, from the white men and women who rose to power by enslaving persecuting, and, yes, killing African-Americans to those African-Americans who sacrificed, in every imaginable way, to survive the times.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Cabin
    The drama grows more plainly mature in the last few volumes, but the sheer amount of what Lance Black and the creative team are biting off here ends up limiting just how knowledgeable, sincere, and convincing the series comes off as.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The cast is so uniformly excellent that one's seduced into following the narrative despite the show's rather glaring narrative flaws.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Where Bourdain and Melville go to painstaking lengths to describe the addictions, hardships, and unending effort that went into the toils at the center of their tales, Feed the Beast only expresses a basic admiration for the process and love for the end product, which makes [creator Clyde] Phillips's perspective feel more like that of a hungry customer than of a relentless artist in the kitchen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Babylon wants to both mock the no-bull crassness of political wheelers and dealers and cling to a moralistic view of government, and the writers fail to find cohesion between these two perspectives more times than not. As a result, the humor often feels dulled by the relevancy of the subject matter, and the politics come off as both self-serious and frivolous.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Even in its tense, involving conclusion, the final season of The Killing conjures nothing so much as a more compact recitation of its mundane pessimism, still incapable of shaking the humdrum drama and redundant thrills that forced the series to find a new home in the first place.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Though the series continues to be handsomely lensed and sports perceptive, complex performances from Sheen and Caplan, the writers hesitate to take chances outside of this established dichotomy between the reserved visual style and the frank, open discussions about sex.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Ironically mirroring Dexter's strict adherence to Vogel and Harry's carefully drawn guidelines, the series abides by a strict set of narrative routines that it only marginally alters in the hopes of replicating the wild success and catharsis of its inaugural season again and again.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    As it stands, the series is stuck in neutral, between caring about what happens to these people and wanting to see them tear each other to shreds for sport.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    For all the agility on display in Into the Badlands, the series feels narratively uncertain, stuck between the simple pleasures of genre staples and the sadly unfulfilled aspiration toward a more imaginative, substantive work of stylized fantasy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    There's an intermittently engaging trashiness to this season of True Detective, but the overall production feels overbearingly self-serious, though not in any self-aware way that would excuse the entire death-drunk schematics Pizzolatto has designed here.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The series ultimately feels like a nostalgia trip, less for the era in which it's set than for the original film that spawned it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    If Daniels had put more emphasis on the polish of his artifice and gave the show’s aesthetic the same bombast that it’s tawdry, openly cheesy dialogue gives the story, Star might have proven to be a subversive, infuriated series. It’s overall look, however, is more chintzy than anything else, wrecked with soft focus and lazy, unconvincing you-are-there camerawork.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The show ultimately feels like a kind of meager mechanism, fine-tuned to deliver jolts, laughs, and maybe even tears, which is the exact opposite of who Dobesh is in the pages of Crouch’s books.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The problem here is the writing, which consistently feels belabored and overtly complicated while the show itself remains largely just about Dirk and Todd and their adventures.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    All The Way is passable, even lively at moments, but it’s also calcified by its repetitive, bloated discussions about the rights and wrongs of the civil rights movement and, more importantly, the two-party system of American government. The best lines go to Cranston, who clearly relishes the language, candor, and physicality of his character in every frame in which he appears, but beyond him, there’s no real sense of the conflictive character that denotes these real-life figures.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    There’s no expansion or even mutation of the noir style beyond an increase in humor and a moderate amount of self-awareness, neither of which is strong enough to override how plodding and unadventurous this all feels.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The talent involved is enough to ensure that Comedy Central’s latest is vaguely amusing, but Idiotsitter should have been more riotous than amiable, more uniquely ruthless than blandly juvenile.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    Unfortunately, the truth of the matter is that Shades of Blue has no shading in character or story, and is more interested in reiterating transposed views of family values than dealing with the tough and often very ugly subject matter it purports to confront.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The intentions of those who made Shots Fired are stridently righteous and good but in attempting to see the whole picture of race and police accountability in America, they’ve seemingly forgotten two a cardinal rule of visual storytelling: less is more.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    Not for nothing does Animals similarly feel like a series of vague, mildly surreal takes on life events and actions, all of which are alternatively carelessly sarcastic in tone or lacking in the wild pulse of life that denotes the existence of animals big and small, rather than a studied approximation of just such things.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    Even great casts have their limits, and in the case of Goliath, they give this shaggy drama just enough electricity to keep interest without offering a genuine reason to care about what’s going on episode to episode.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    In following a case-of-the-week format with the series, the show must rely on its level of technical nuance and the wit of its characters, and Bull doesn’t let anyone but Weatherly really stand out.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The just-sufficient fascination of the entire operation is owed almost exclusively to the cast, with special nods to Donovan, Strickland, and the indomitable Rossellini. The rest of Shut Eye is engaging only at the most base level, and fails to conjure the menace, magic, or all-around strangeness of a life made passing messages along from beyond this plain of existence, whether genuine or not.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    Everything that happens in Empire feels automatically flippant and unimportant, even as the cast continues to do engaging, emotional work in each episode. At this point, Empire seems to be continuing on for no other reason other than it can.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The result is a show that’s imaginative on paper but little more than mildly amusing in practice.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    There’s a hesitancy to confront the thicket of conflicting emotions that are being hinted at underneath the not-so-charmed life of the Wells girls and the women they work with (or against) but the origins and the precariousness of these feelings never quite explored with any daring or seriousness. ...There is the constant use of the titular term, which rips you out of the action without care whenever it’s hurled about, but that’s not half as annoying as the music.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The result is a familiar yet no-less-depressing annual occurrence on network TV: a comedy built for vague amusement rather than real laughs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    There are potent and provocative ideas that lie frustratingly dormant throughout this series, which seems to be just happy to play a competent but only occasionally compelling Michael Mann riff.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The Young Pope is TV’s equivalent of a dorm-room poster of Bob Marley blowing smoke or the Lenny Bruce mugshot: a depleted symbol of a radical reaction to society that finally most clearly represents the status quo.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The Path lacks a feeling of risk, a palpable sense of walking the plank of faith along with the long-blind Meyerists in some way.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Chris Cabin
    The result is a intermittently promising, hugely irritating series that often feels as if it’s directly catering to a DC-fan contingency excited for nothing more than to see characters from the comics be realized on the small screen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The Path is unfortunately content to focus on a variety of rote melodramatic byways that give little insight into the fight between faith and personal desire, or the psychological relief and societal bliss that believers expect from their chosen religions.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Led by a charmingly haggard Duchovny, Aquarius has the makings of a pulpy procedural, but the series is riddled with thin, too-familiar ideas about race, homosexuality, sexism, art, politics, and capitalism that come off as at once bloated and rushed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The Mindy Project is far more interested in the worn-out comic agenda of a smart, independent woman hamstrung by her obsession with finding commitment with a man than it is in self-excoriation or the unique proclivities of a chosen community.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    For all its clear outrage, One Child presents absolutely zero challenging ideas of what to do in reaction to these sort of crimes against humanity, other than to ostensibly deal with it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Unlike Law & Order, Chicago P.D. doesn't possess a crucial shagginess, a sense of experience and knowledge in these supposedly weary and seasoned characters that cuts through the hardened cynicism of the show's atmosphere.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    As The League begins to wind down, there's no clear indication that the showrunners see the less charming elements of their at least partially reprehensible characters as often as they celebrate their minor, shallow victories.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Baskets settles for being a dingy theater of humiliation, like the very worst scenes in Todd Solondz's films, without the visual flare or bold, challenging characters.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The Following similarly takes one of the oldest genre conceits in the book, strips away all manner of personal detail, gallows humor, and the genuinely grotesque, and tries to sell what remains as horrifying instead of plainly sadistic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The show's creators have replaced the original Lucifer with neither a counterpoint nor an interesting abstraction. Instead, they've simply shaped yet another paean to the perfect dude, who can carry on a lewd, open affair with his psychiatrist, play matchmaker with Dancer and her ex, and solve every major crime that the LAPD is called in for.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The Brink has no backbone, which happens to be the one thing that satire requires.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The turns of the convoluted plot and the thick-as-a-brick backstories of the largely dull, undetailed characters are all that seem to matter to the show's writers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    Moments [of rampant product placement] cheapen an already paper-thin premise and unstable narrative trajectory that means to measure masculinity by how tortured a man acts and how miserable he feels each time he beats the shit out of someone.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    There's a rigidity to the entire production, the unmistakable feeling of a series that was market-tested to death in every predictable plot turn, and every rote, over-written joke.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The series is marked by a half-hearted view of faith, lacking in anything even approaching insight, which is damning given that destiny (Sagal's mystic sees Brattle's place in a shifting political and spiritual landscape) is one of the central ideas at play here.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    Underneath the shallow brooding, everything feels like build-up to a massive climactic event, every maneuver directed, written, and acted as if it were yet another crucial move toward some terribly violent, bad end. The tactic is meant to drum up suspense, which it doesn't do particularly well, and the series loses any sense of humanity, shirking the very pulse of life the titular vampire hungers for.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    The acting is largely endurable but there’s no variety, no feeling of these actors actually trying to evince a thoughtful persona from what’s been handed to them. The writing is the premiere issue but there’s rarely any sign of the performers putting effort into giving shape or tone to those words.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    For all the offense that could be culled from this woefully self-serious, violence-solves-everything nonsense, what’s most troubling about 24: Legacy is how little it cares about the inner workings of its characters.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    Pacific Heat feels hollowed out and devoid of even the slightest measure of personality. Even the animation design feels completely apathetic and bare-bones, which might have been fine if the writing had elicited any emotion beyond boredom and one or two blips of offense.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    The pilot episode features some handsome compositions, but neither the imagery nor the predictable plodding of the story suggest any insights into concepts of fate, religion, free will, and human nature.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    The jokes that are deployed in Rush Hour, though certainly not the worst I’ve heard on TV recently, are so deeply uninspired, so uncaring in relation to the story and the characters, that the focus on such things leaves a sour aftertaste.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    The characters that are introduced don’t come off as individuals even for a moment, but rather, as simply functioning as elements of a dramatic mechanism, creaking and whirling in repetition.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    There’s no nuance to their thinking, no unexpected wrench in the gears that they won’t eventually be able to out-maneuver, and this weighs down an already laughably heavy-handed narrative.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    The amount of story that they try to fit in zaps the narrative of any momentum and strikes out any scene that doesn’t speak directly to an upcoming plot twist or sheer exposition.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    Wrecked is never quite as offensive or simply frustrating as something like, say, The Ranch, but even that thoroughly false comedy had a clear perspective and a narrative trajectory, whereas Wrecked feels--please, please forgive me--lost at sea.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    There’s simply no evidence that any care or passion was put into Training Day from what’s been put on the screen.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    A borderline unbearable and patently unfunny attempt at the straight-laced sitcom, complete with a no-kidding laugh track, from two long-time producers of Two and a Half Men, easily the most unforgivable and inexcusable of the long-running sitcoms.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    Lethal Weapon is a near-catastrophic failure. It’s the kind of overbearingly self-serious, sheepishly crass retelling of a story that no one needed to be repeated that we’ve come to expect from similar movie-to-TV adaptations.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Cabin
    Mind you, vomit can be very funny; it’s just not funny here. Neither is 99% of what goes on in each episode, but there’s a potent sense of bemusement to everything, a fakeness bordering on overt coyness.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    Partners is bad even by most lawyer-joke standards, and the writing's falseness and laziness carries over to the performances.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 0 Chris Cabin
    What remains is the dullest and most loathsome kind of movie out there, the kind that uses its overtly sarcastic tone to shield from any criticism.

Top Trailers