For 82 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 14.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chris Cabin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 45
Highest review score: 100 Timbuktu
Lowest review score: 12 Winter's Tale
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 82
  2. Negative: 45 out of 82
82 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Cabin
    As depicted by Jia Zhang-ke, the balance between the spoils and moral rot of murder are far preferable to the debasing rigors of tradition and hollow nationalism.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Cabin
    The film's criticism isn't primarily rooted in satire, but rather in fury and condemnation for those who seek to be gods while shamefully feigning to follow and praise one god.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Cabin
    The dangers of filmmakers trying to replicate a golden era rather than embrace the present are part and parcel of Inherent Vice, but the ramifications are political as well.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    A madly creative, darkly comical, and fiendishly self-aware actioner with muscle to spare.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    With the film, Lee Daniels quietly pushes his talent for hashing out visceral, violent emotions into unexpected dramatic terrain.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    As played by an eloquently beleaguered Oscar Isaac, Llewyn Davis is arguably the most vivid and complex character the Coens have dreamed up since Marge Gunderson.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    That the filmmakers consistently catch the nuances of character that bind the two men to each other, rather than simply tracing the pros and cons of their dispositions, is what gives the film its melancholic yet vibrant resonance.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    An astute summation of Mike Leigh's glum view of humanity, but also a challenge to this disposition and his own pessimistic perspective.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Chris Cabin
    The thrill of watching Fletcher and Neyman's fray unfold is intensified by Damien Chazelle's attention to the craft and challenge of musicianship.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Funny, moving, honest, and occasionally inspiring, but as a portrait of a talent emerging from the shadow of a more public talent, the scale of the shadow is curiously omitted.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Ida
    Pawel Pawlikowski shows great empathy toward the idea of illusions as a way of attaining emotional stability in even the most brutal terrain.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    However messy this overextended and oddly compelling work feels from moment to moment, the end result evokes the life of working artists without sentimentality or undue grandeur.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Cabin
    Roberto Minervini has created a moving portrait of feminism born out of hard work and intuitiveness, but he never belittles or condescends to the faithful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Worry and sadness are palpable, but so is wry humor and irony as Song ponders age and mortality with a sensitive eye for emotions and a strong sense of composition.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    A cheekily gruesome and genuinely urgent entertainment, Blomkamp's latest nevertheless can't help but beg the question: Where's Snake Plissken when you need him?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    A surprisingly thoughtful romantic comedy that shirks a great deal of reason and consequence in the name of love.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    The film is thin on concept and limited in style, but the filmmakers have the good sense to let their characters remain playful and goofy throughout.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    The film is thematically thin, and it has a tendency to embrace the action genre's more obnoxious elements, but there's a proudly no-nonsense air to its nonsensicality.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Dan Gilroy's directorial debut only offers a familiar vision of today's newsman and producers as misery peddlers, and callow ratings slaves bordering on the monstrous.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    By rooting Noni's self-image issues in a controlling mother, the script provides the film with a tame, melodramatic structure that dulls the thorny matters of identity and expression at its center.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Adrián García Bogliano ends up merely toying with the death-steeped concerns of his characters, and taking the furious and bitter perspective that powers the narrative's ponderous dramatic core for granted.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The film's aesthetic is marked by off-tempo editing and a tone that vacillates between grim and coy, and though it's occasionally visually evocative, it's also unmistakably over-calculated.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The film is nothing without the physicality of the performers, as Joss Whedon's script handles the transition of Shakespeare's language to modern day indifferently.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Though the cast partially eschews the family-friendly timidity that the film defers to in the end, this would-be wild thing remains little more than a rowdy endorsement of the status quo.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    We're only allowed an insufficient glimpse of the anxiousness and curiosity that drive these creatures, a tactic which feels suspiciously like hesitance masquerading as enigma.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    All Is Bright remains engaging, for the most part, but most of the big narrative turns feel both predictable and forced, and at odds with the natural charms of the cast.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Though occasionally aesthetically alluring and evocative, feels like an introductory chapter to a more substantive, sprawling study of the actor.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The films that Robert Rodriguez emulates here are known for similar unexpected narrative turns, but the crucial value that he misses is their actual cheapness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    When Jérôme Bonnell allows his two magnificent leads to work at the sparse dialogue, he invokes a powerful, elemental sense of frank, sexual discussion and high-end flirtation, imbuing the relationships with a maturity that's loathsomely rare in films today.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    For the most part, it's a gas, but the light touch Raymond De Felitta gives the material is at once its saving grace and its tremendous limiter.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The narrative doesn't want for ambition, but Marc Webb proves unwilling, or incapable, of making this unwieldy story feel like anything but a deluge of backstory.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    It only conveys the awesome strangeness of its characters and their universe when director Brian Singer breaks away from the perpetual build-up of the film's unwieldy plot.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Stuart Murdoch clearly knows quite a bit about crafting pop tunes, but the film's consideration of the work of songwriting is totally flippant.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The flippancy toward the story's thematic concerns and character construction suggests that the film, like the boxtrolls' myriad gadgets and inventions, was largely built from used parts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The film devolves quickly into a pedestrian character study that basks in Gary Webb's public shaming and victimization, losing sight of the bravery and probing talent that characterized his writing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Much like his hero, Christopher Nolan's goal seems to be to take the humor and wildness out of imagination, to see invention in rigidly practical and scientific terms.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    A would-be thriller masquerading a long, dry monument to the reliability and comfort of community, blindly cocooned by its own nostalgic self-regard.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Offers all the ingredients for a great feast of enticing visions and thematic concerns, only to have them be prepared, plated, and served with the grace of Elmer Fudd.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Arvin Chen's Taiwan is dominated by eccentricity in tone and atmosphere, but in a very careful, pronounced way, as to never really run the danger of being truly strange.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Tina Gordon Chism's film collapses into a series of clumsy improvisatory sketches, tied up in cheap, risibly sentimental catharsis.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The art of storytelling is both of distinct narrative interest and personal issue in the latest payload of calcified nonsense from one of modern cinema's oddest would-be auteurs.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    All its faux-patriotism isn't played for satire, but instead utilized to align the film with an idyllic, unquestioned vision of goodness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The script's jumble of plot asides and family-friendly pandering is enough to make you want to root for a hero.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Praises the electric carelessness of teenage angst while depicting it as if it were ultimately no more exciting, though no less pleasant, than an hour in the wave pool.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    It's hard to ignore the fact that a substantial percentage of Letourneur's would-be character study is dedicated to concentrated Schadenfreude that's unbalanced and without any real narrative weight.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Enough can't be said about how the late James Gandolfini comes so close to saving writer-director Nicole Holofcener's latest articulation of white suburban anxieties.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Ron Howard's by-the-seat-of-your-pants aesthetic makes the slower, darker sequences feel hurried and bland, especially when stacked up next to the racing sequences.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The songs still sound great here, but the instruments aren't amplified nearly as much as the nostalgia and vanity of the men who wield them.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Gavin Hood relays a vague sense of what it's like to live in duty, and yet at a distance from one's home, but this vision of the future never rouses, never asks to be remembered.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The film's half-hearted plea for responsibility and ethics in the news, after joyfully rolling around in its corruption for the majority of its runtime, smacks of plain pandering.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The film refuses to openly engage the isolationism and hardened cynicism that's often part and parcel of being a career police officer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The meager comeuppance and hasty notes of sweetness that end the film feel pre-approved rather than organically realized.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Whatever the film's interest may be in the marginalized, writer-director Richard Ayoade never alludes to what would even be worth fighting for in this nightmarish industrial landscape.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    There's no sense of visual artifice to match the ludicrous pitch of the script, and subsequently, the film comes off as awkward and uncertain.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Jon Favreau's film comes off as flippant in its view of independent labor as a universally liberating experience for an artist and businessman.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Whereas a single, stinging one-liner would have sufficed Jacques Tourneur or Fritz Lang, Frank Miller's overcompensating flood of pulpy dialogue only renders his characters flat and sans empathy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    All of Scott Frank's thematic concerns are little more than window dressing for a run-of-the-mill detective story in line with '90s thrillers like The Bone Collector.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    Justin Lin strives to approximate something like Ocean's Eleven for petrosexuals, but testosterone outweighs wit and cleverness at every turn in Chris Morgan's starched script.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The zombies twitch, leap, gnash, and destroy, but the film has all the thrill and surprise of a model U.N. summit.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    An awfully expensive and grossly extended Cialis commercial.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    Raja Gosnell's particular zeal to modernize the Smurfs only develops this would-be family comedy into a shamelessly manipulative smurftastrophe.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The film doubles down on the love-hate relationship with ultra-violence that typified its predecessor, but A History of Violence this is not.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    A full realization of the very worst fears one could imagine when its director, James Wan, unexpectedly emerged from the torture-porn murk with its original, spiritedly directed predecessor.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    A dim anti-privatization parable that preaches a familiar strain of cynical, unchallenged self-righteousness in the face of widespread abuse of civil liberties.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The film is absent of humor and thrills, and accented with designs and color schemes that are equally notable for their lack of risk.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The breadth of Vince Vaughn's gregarious persona has never been given free reign by any director and this certainly isn't the game-changer.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    The strain to make the film both an educational tool and a child-minded entertainment is noticeable throughout.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    There's no personality in the design or the script, which only renders the cynical aftertaste of this convoluted one-squirrel-against the-world story all the more potent.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    Even when compared to other films posing as Ford Mustang commercials, Need for Speed isn't particularly memorable for anything other than the startling incompetence and dull sheen of the end result.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    That Dom is so clearly an up-to-11 caricature, embodied with reliable pizzazz by Jude Law, makes the sentimental moments feel especially false.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    It's hard to see the fiscal woes at the center of Zach Braff's second feature as anything more than a fashionable depiction of first-world problems.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    A film so overworked to ensure mass-market appeal that it loses the charming oddness and loose goofiness that has allowed these characters to endure.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Chris Cabin
    For all the brawn on display, the film never slows down to take in the thrill and talent of hand-to-hand combat.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    David Siegel and Scott McGehee's film renders the rhapsodic Henry James novel of the same name into an abhorrent slice of tasteless familial drama.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    Like most of Neil LaBute's work in the field of "emotional terrorism," the film protests that bad behavior isn't only good, but also essential to art.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    The obvious amount of hard work that went into this out-of-touch sequel is partly what makes it so irritating.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    The sexism isn't quite as noxious as one might find in Tyler Perry's films, but that's as far as the compliments go when it comes to this overextended and deeply crude sermon.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    Fantasy is heavily dependent on vision, which Mark Helprin had in spades, but the look of Akiva Goldsman's fantasy is limp, timid, and occasionally outright awkward.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    By the time a blackmailing plot is introduced, the film seems to be surviving solely on the fumes of curse words and frequent shots of Jason Segal and Cameron Diaz's backsides.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    Jason Reitman fails to take into account any of the positive endeavors enabled by social media, which will no doubt be used to promote and market his film.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 12 Chris Cabin
    One long trial of moral duty, and one that excuses repugnant behavior and psychological warfare in lieu of a repetitive, condescending sermon on honoring thy father.

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