For 56 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chris Packham's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Still I Strive
Lowest review score: 20 Mission Park
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 28 out of 56
  2. Negative: 14 out of 56
56 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Packham
    But the directors elevate the picture to a level of emotional genius by filming the children's play as a full-on cinematic adaptation, shot and edited with seriousness and polish.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Chris Packham
    Through photos and family lore, but mostly through Dayton's own eloquence, Mitchell assembles a biographical portrait that's inspiring in the best possible way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Chris Packham
    Brian Knappenberger's The Internet's Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz connects the dots of Swartz's past, assembling a vivid portrait of a sensitive genius with a strong moral sense.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Packham
    With its interrogations of gender, feminism, and marriage, Shakespeare's comedy is an apt vehicle for Whedon's own storytelling agenda.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Packham
    Sincere and unexpectedly good.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Chris Packham
    Director Nabil Ayouch depicts the sprawling, ramshackle Sidi Moumen slums with fluid camera movements... He finds the humanity and the hopelessness in its narrow streets, its fields of rubble, monstrous trash dumps, and grim marketplaces.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Quaid has a genius for broadcasting conflicting impulses. His body language twists uncomfortably away from his intentions, and his smile is built on the chassis of a cringe.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Writer-director Josh Boone populates Stuck in Love with smart characters breaking from emotional holding patterns of varying contours.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    A wide-ranging, if shallow, exploration of intrusive government surveillance practices.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    The music is incredible, and through interviews with Rosey Grier, Afrika Bambaataa, Questlove, and a squadron of old-school studio musicians, director Dan Forrer unearths some of the hidden history of American pop.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    With its fun script and cheap visuals, Escape Plan evokes the halfwit cheesiness of 1980s-era Cannon films, but it also recalls the deft pacing and legibility of their action sequences.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    The episodic story and minimal budget result in a small canvas over which these two huge characters dominate.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Despite the psychological extremes, writer-director Francesca Gregorini presents her characters as recognizably human balls of complexity, nudging but never forcing them toward a sad, beautiful conclusion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Maxine Peake is a revelation in Run & Jump, communicating vitality and extraordinary optimism that practically bleeds out and infects the visuals.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    The Art of the Steal doesn't advance the nerdy intertextuality that has distinguished ironic crime films since Guy Ritchie, but writer-director Jonathan Sobol knows the ropes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Mannered and often very funny.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Small details and incidents accrete into a pointillist rendering of despair.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Fed Up is a workmanlike documentary, as undistinguished in style as a PowerPoint slide show. It nonetheless finds traction in its depiction of the food industry's Montgomery Burns–like practices.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Co-director and narrator Ben Knight interviews activists, officials, social jammers, and scientists, approaching the subject not with outrage, but with humor and optimism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    Strangely Bechdel Test-failing and as far removed from real life as Middle Earth, Lucky Them nonetheless hits familiar beats in welcome and unexpected ways, and does it by the book.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Chris Packham
    The frank honesty of these accounts testifies to the trust Junger and Hetherington cultivated among the Second Platoon in 2008.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Packham
    Khalfoun makes the audience privy to Frank's memories, migraines, and jarring hallucinations of his mother's recalled abuses.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Packham
    The film’s hidden asset is the luminous Mary Steenburgen, funny and gorgeous as an empty-nest mom turned lounge chanteuse who beguiles the dudes with age-appropriate flirting and arch humor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Packham
    What's remarkable is that despite the sweaty overdetermination of the film's dude-bro interactions and the whole prefabricated concept of performance air sex, the love story has actual depth and sadness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Chris Packham
    The comic plot of Fonzy is outrageous, but to writer-director Isabelle Doval, it's just an armature that supports its gently funny characters and its themes of emotional and filial connections.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Packham
    Akinnagbe's embodiment of Jack is the most wholly realized accomplishment in the film. His speech, hesitant and stammering, is matched by defensive body language, his walk and posture as guarded and wary as a bird's. It's a truly physical performance in a film that didn't demand it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Packham
    It's often funny, and the writers are smart, but the film is like an arcless, extended episode of It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Packham
    The middle third of the film comprises the phone call, a tight 40 minutes.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Packham
    With The Hangover Part III, director Todd Phillips continues to occupy an apt (and very lucrative) niche, casting rich, entitled fraternity dicks as underdog heroes beset by shrewish women, foreigners with funny accents, and even animals-often cute animals with big, dewy eyes.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Packham
    Blood wants to be a Greek tragedy about family loyalties, guilt, and the fall of a dynasty, but the characters never manage to connect with one another, separated by gulfs of melodramatic angst and the plot demands of a boringly unspooled police procedural.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Packham
    Bad Milo! meets your expectations right where you left them.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Packham
    Franco adapted a book that often reads like joyless homework into a film that feels the same way.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Packham
    Peter Wingfield delivers an engagingly oily Claudius, and Lara Gilchrist's Ophelia is radiant. But Ramsay's Hamlet's madness never really overcomes the character's traditional emo temperament.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Chris Packham
    Good-natured and completely forgettable.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    Unfortunately, the interesting drabness of the afterlife’s police department is paired with the colorless paucity of the film’s heavies...The deados, unmemorable CG brutes, spout generic bad-guy dialogue undistinguished by humor or characterization.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    The Secret Lives of Dorks, starring Jim Belushi, is, well, the Jim Belushi of high-school romantic comedies: indifferent, kind of exhausted.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    Like the Saw franchise, Cassadaga, directed by Anthony DiBlasi, attempts to leverage the horror genre in the service of inducing epiphanies, but keeps tripping over its confused tangle of genres.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    The exhausting and unrelatable Our Day Will Come escalates to a violent rampage as essentially unpleasant and nonsensical as its characters.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    There's a lot of onscreen music-making, some of it amazing, the rest Santa-related.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    A study in the frustrating insufferableness of people you probably agree with.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    The white saviors are flat, 2D manifestations of virtue... And the film's Indians? They aren't characters at all.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    Rio 2 wants to be a musical, but instead of timing songs to, say, the emotional peaks of the characters, director Carlos Saldanha opts for high-intensity intervals of singing every four minutes.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    Emoticon ;), a vanity project written, directed, starring, and sung by Livia De Paolis, is a grown-up's weird idea of how kids behave.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Chris Packham
    Premature, you will be exhausted to hear, is a teen sex comedy with the plot of Groundhog Day, its supernatural comedy hearkening more to Scott Baio's Zapped! than to Porky's.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Packham
    The tense prologue of writer-director Bryan Ramirez's Mission Park...evokes a tactile, scary reality utterly betrayed by the following 90-minute string of hackneyed, basic-cable plotting and dialogue.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Packham
    The dull Adventures of the Penguin King is definitely the laziest of the waddle-coms to win theatrical release.
    • 7 Metascore
    • 20 Chris Packham
    Too bad that Urban's stab at black-comedy satire is hobbled by the obviousness of his characters.