For 337 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chuck Bowen's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Kate Plays Christine
Lowest review score: 0 Queen of the Desert
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 83 out of 337
337 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Writer-director Boo Junfeng casually reinvigorates the prison drama, boiling its elements down to their primal essence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Appropriately, the images in the film, the most fluidly beautiful and resonant of Nathan Silver's career thus far, suggest flashes of memory relived from the vantage point of the future.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    As in Rodney Ascher's previous film, Room 237, the subject of obsession is complemented by a despairing attempt to process it, corral it, and somehow conquer it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Joe Swanberg's films have grown into a reliable relief from the competitive, dehumanizing freneticism of much of American culture, marked by an affirming and understated sense of decency.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    It elegantly evolves from an absurdist comedy into a remarkably wounded and uprooted story of friends who're beginning to tire of their shared social cocoons.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Albert Maysles's portrait of Iris Apfel gradually emerges with cathartic clarity without compromising her inherent mystery.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film communicates a sporadic sense of violation—of pastiche unpredictably giving way to a raw and primordially intimate emotional realm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film has an artisanal intensity that prevents it from turning into a smug and predictable exercise in political revision.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Eliza Hittman's film captures the exclusive properties of sex with a degree of intimacy and empathy that, at times, feels authentically revelatory.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film ultimately understands poverty as a profound and often irreversible desolation of terra firma.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Reminiscent of Woody Allen's great, under-sung Manhattan Murder Mystery, it utilizes a pulp conceit as a shorthand for the regrets that bubble up in a marriage.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Coming Home is a film in which everyone's dreams are irrevocably broken, the pieces too small to grasp, let alone pick up.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Andrew Bujalski seizes upon physical training as a resonant metaphor for the work and risk that are inherent in cultivating significant interpersonal connections.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film's plot isn't unusual, but director Ron Morales strips it down to its primal essence.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    There's an artisanal scruffiness to Win It All that testifies to Joe Swanberg’s quiet fluidity as a filmmaker.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The doc is a sly, interesting achievement: It opens as an entertaining sports story and closes as a metaphor for government corruption.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Aarón Fernández captures one of the most heartening elements of sex: that it doesn't always oblige our rules or expectations.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Julia Ivanova, a Canadian filmmaker, doesn't judge Olga; she refuses to see her through the eyes of a presumably better-off first-world citizen.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Alison Bagnall and her talented leads appear to effortlessly achieve a tone that's tricky to sustain, one that abounds equally in absurdism and empathy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    With The Handmaiden, Park Chan-wook has made a gigantic leap as an artist, but he retreats to lurid cartoonishness just as he’s earned your trust.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The film is so unusually moving and penetrating because it refuses to cloud its emotions in distancing irony, anger, or nihilism.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    It's the rare coming-of-age narrative that manages to respect the tricky ambiguities of shifting perceptions.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    When Bo Mikkelsen springs his traditional yet cathartic climax, it's earned because the violence matters truly as violation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    It compellingly captures a family wrestling mightily with the riddles and contradictions of a culture that promotes achievement at all costs with little thought as to what that actually means.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Director John McNaughton, once an agile orchestrator of seemingly incompatible tones, has retained his talent for teasing insinuation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The film is in part an exceedingly black comedy that parodies proper society's eager, self-righteous naïveté on the subject of its children.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Like a number of cult directors to emerge in the 1970s, Henry Jaglom values a party atmosphere at the expense of narrative cohesion.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Each of the six vignettes that make up this unusually energetic anthology pertains to the methods of calculated mass dehumanization that are (barely) hidden beneath the practices of social institutions.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Noah Buschel shows that formula can be repurposed to serve empathetic ends without losing its self-actualizing appeal.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    It grounds us so effectively in Joplin's emotional realm as to partially rekindle the social transcendence that her voice must have represented for its owner.

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