For 71 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chuck Bowen's Scores

Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Better Call Saul: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Anger Management: Season 2
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 40 out of 71
  2. Negative: 13 out of 71
71 tv reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Chuck Bowen
    It's an honest tearjerker that treats its characters with respect, according them a great sense of wounded, tattered dignity.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Chuck Bowen
    Season six is comparatively slow, and obsessive, which is a relief from the convolutions that had grown to characterize Justified. We're allowed to savor those great dialogue exchanges between lovers and antagonists that ultimately define the series.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Chuck Bowen
    Steven Soderbergh's The Knick is exhilaratingly alien.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Chuck Bowen
    For its authentic engagement with despair, Hannibal earns its wrenching nihilism: It's a great, epic vision of American horror.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Chuck Bowen
    The imagery is gorgeous yet curt and parred, with jagged editing complementing the declaratory dialogue and Shane Carruth's spare score.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Chuck Bowen
    Justified is the strongest, liveliest, and most tonally accurate adaptation of the writer's work to date, and the latest season bracingly suggests that isn't likely to change anytime soon.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Chuck Bowen
    The show's writing is as economic and poetically parred. Each moment is compact, leading to the next with unpredictable, behaviorally astute precision.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Hannibal is richer and more ambiguous than prior Harris adaptations; it's an exploration of social decay that's rife with literal and figurative cancers eating everyone alive from the ground up.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Atlanta exhilaratingly explores the complicated intersections between pop culture, capitalism, and crime, revealing them all to be united by the notion of sales trumping morality and even reality.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    There's quite a bit going on underneath the show's deceptively raw, on-the-fly simplicity. It's also often a hilarious, exhilaratingly dangerous mixture of the broad, macabre, and political.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The narrative's broad strokes are compelling, particularly as defensive attorney Jack Stone (John Turturro) begins to uncover the murder suspects who detective Dennis Box (Bill Camp) couldn't be bothered to dig up, but it's the textural flourishes that distinguish The Night Of from more formulaic courtroom fare, such as the continuing emphasis that Zaillian and Price place on the notion of ritual as cultural currency.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Subtext gives Easy its tart edge, emboldening it with an obsessiveness that resists fashionable platitudes. Swanberg captures the frictions between men and women and yuppies and bohemians, revealing a common core of fear that the other has got it better.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Luther embodies almost everything that's refreshing about the traditional British crime drama.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    [The] narrative succinctly pokes at a number of social fissures at once--most obviously the controversy over the treatment of the animals we eat, but it also more figuratively suggests the plights of the elderly and even of immigrants.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Girls is still undergoing ultimately minor growing pains, but it's frequently poignant and audacious, and actors who made little impression in the first season are allowed to flower.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    What Billions offers is vicarious revelry in stylish power, exuding a trashy, toxic purity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The actors are charismatic enough to compensate for the self-consciousness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    As an artist, Maron appears to relish the idea of breaking his fictional self off from a path paralleling his own. In the two episodes screened for the press, Maron reveals a newfound presence as an actor, deepening the punchlines, which are almost entirely at his expense.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The 50 Year Argument resembles a reader-centric Behind the Music only on the surface; underneath, Scorsese and Tedeschi have fashioned an American cultural hall of mirrors that speaks of the chaotic exhilaration of fostering discourse that might initiate real social engagement. If that's naïve, screw it: This pop culture could use more of Scorsese's naïveté.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Creator Hugo Blick, who wrote and directed every episode, displays a knack for precisely parceling out bafflingly vague innuendos with the occasional nugget of undiluted exposition that comes as a sweet relief, not just for the viewer, but for the characters who are often as clueless as we are.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The Spoils of Babylon is a dada high-wire act presided over by quasi-satirical nutters, and the chaos they invoke is oddly life-affirming.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The Strain is a refreshingly bold deviation from TV's obsession with literal-minded crime shows that self-consciously flaunt their social relevance while wallowing in soap-operatic macho tropes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Bette and Joan is at its canniest when contrasting Bette and Joan's respective vanities, understanding that Bette's has aged better than Joan's, and that Joan was misguidedly devising, in Baby Jane, the rules that would enable her own upstaging.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Like the characters who occupy Guest's best work, particularly A Mighty Wind, Tom and his friends have real stature, and the jokes often gracefully comment on their yearning to puncture the bubbles of their own self-concern to connect to others.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    A lurid, textured soap opera with an understanding of finance as a rarefied ecosystem that rules unto itself at the cost of most everyone else. The literate macho zingers often suggest a modern-day Sweet Smell of Success, compellingly merging with the casually worn cynicism.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The Bridge doesn't have the forceful originality of other socially conscious dramas such as Justified and Hannibal, but it's off to a promisingly lurid start.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Luther feels just a bit more ordinary than usual this season, though it serves as another reminder of how magnificently, expressively physical Elba is as a performer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    This Casual Vacancy is a little too earnest, which renders the depictions of the class warfare trite and preachy.... [Abigail] Lawrie disrupts the coziness that occasionally threatens to calcify The Casual Vacancy into another lush, prestigious book-on-film, imbuing it with an authentic cry of the damned.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Santa Clarita Diet is a charmingly goofy lark, revealing itself to be a comedy of remarriage hidden in zombie's clothing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Maron portrays a war against self-pity that's unusually resonant for its willingness to plumb the legitimately pitiful.

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