For 312 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chuck Bowen's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Laurence Anyways
Lowest review score: 0 33 Postcards
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 79 out of 312
312 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    After a surprising development, the film grows slack and sentimental, reverting to the survival-movie platitude about hardship making you a better human.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Theo Who Lived is fascinating, and Theo Padnos is an exacting storyteller, but the film pushes through one story point to the next, occasionally prizing velocity over texture.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The documentary is briskly paced, often compelling, but a little soft, as it succumbs to hero worship.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film is just a stunt or, more specifically, a calling card, but that might be enough for anyone who's ever wanted to kick Mickey Mouse square in his padded, pious balls.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The "male gaze" that often despicably and hypocritically surfaces in these kinds of films is pointedly absent throughout.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Ariel Kleiman fashions an erotic atmosphere of dusty sensuality that complicates our judgement of this world, but he takes shortcuts.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Wayne Kramer thankfully refuses to cloak his excessiveness in hedge-betting self-consciousness and the result is a gratifyingly disreputable B-movie blow out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Michael Winterbottom and his gifted actors still haven't quite solved the riddle of portraying social disconnection in a manner that's anything other than sporadically involving.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Director Jason Lei Howden has a flair for punchlines that are funny for reasons that are essentially impossible to describe.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    David Hackl often shoots his bear in fashions that accent its lumbering, powerful grace, even during its death rattle.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Ken Loach's staging is so calm and sober that it turns his story into an expertly photographed yet weirdly remote rebellion tale.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Sword of Destiny has an appealingly inventive, unruly genre party streak running down its figurative back.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The lack of ambiguity reflects BenoƮt Jacquot's treatment of the text, which is devoid of either formal obsessiveness or a contemporary hook.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The filmmakers maintain a tone that's mostly ideal for the contemporary equivalent of a drive-in movie: of reverent, parodic irreverence.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The Love We Make is mostly about placing viewers in an icon's shoes as he makes a rehabilitative gesture toward a city with which he's grown considerable roots.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film is unavoidably slight, but there's a certain pleasure in watching talented people wax passionate about a common source of inspiration.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    It has an irritating habit of depending on our natural reactions, letting the subject matter do the heavy lifting.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    There are cheap shocks in the film, but there are also terrifying moments that poetically command our empathy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Writer-director Jason Banker finds the ironic beauty that arises from his characters' self-contemptuous and misplaced acts of destruction.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The script simply isn't in the same league as the images that Andrew Dosunmu and the gifted cinematographer Bradford Young have fashioned.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film soon settles into a confident, well-staged groove, primarily because of two unambiguously terrific performances.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    At least it doesn't make the biopic mistake of attempting to check off every moment of a man's life over the course of a few hours' worth of running time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The script is busy and unconvincing, and much of the acting is lousy, but there are haunting touches.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film doesn't quite earn Jones's performance, but it engenders considerable goodwill for allowing him to give it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    A curiously unsentimental director of romantic comedies, Julie Delpy sees romance for the work that it primarily is.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film is seemingly terrified of boring us, offering one elaborate montage of catch and release (or of survey and flee) after another.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Fake It So Real has been made with considerable more polish than other do-it-yourself documentaries such as "Total Badass," but the sensibility is similar.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    It offers a wonderful visual reprieve from the cumbersomely mechanized aesthetic of so much contemporary fantasy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The images gorgeously embody both the fear and the beauty of James's exploratory experiments with socialization.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    One sees a film called 100 Bloody Acres expecting the requisite allusions to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, but an homage to the best scene in Melvin and Howard comes as something of a shock.

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