For 670 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Connie Ogle's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The King's Speech
Lowest review score: 0 The Man
Score distribution:
670 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Essentially an old-fashioned movie, nothing fancy, nothing new, just some jokes and some action and a crowd-pleasing finale.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The Safety of Objects doesn't carry the power of Ang Lee's "The Ice Storm," a similarly themed work about WASPS in crisis. Objects is too artificial, clunky with too many preposterous situations.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Shares an important slice of German history that is largely unknown.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Manages to sidestep the potential overload of cheap sentimentality -- an intimate dance between an elderly couple registers with heartbreaking sweetness -- and evokes a lingering sense of loss.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The charms of Lucía, Lucía rely heavily on the charismatic Roth, who is funny and warm and a lot of fun to watch as she embraces her new life.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    A well-intentioned coming-of-age film anchored by two indelible performances but weakened by an overabundance of drama.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Half-hearted satire of Hollywood and small-town life, and Bosworth is not particularly memorable in it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    If it's not quite as funny as you want it to be, it's still more than enough to keep you entertained.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The film's heart lies in what goes on at Calvin's shop, that haven from the cold, cruel world. Where else can you get philosophy, humor, friendship and a little off the top?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    There's no doubt that Leigh gets inside his characters' lives. But that's often someplace we'd rather not be.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Plays out as little more than a diversion, one that does not truly break any new ground. But it's undeniably interesting and leaves plenty of room for a more thoughtful film about women and education.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    In the end, Roger Dodger doesn't really add up to much. Guys can be jerks when they're lonely, or even when they're not. It's not news. But Kidd's version of this truth shows he's a writer worth watching.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The sort of movie you enjoy much more while you're watching it in the theater than when you're deconstructing it on the way home.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Far more imaginative and intriguingly moody than other recent thrillers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    A fatal lack of character development dooms Enduring Love as little more than a fleeting curiosity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Don't forget the waves. They're the stars of this show, and Blue Crush smartly never lets you forget it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Vardalos may not have been the best possible Connie. But as Billy Wilder could have told you, nobody's perfect.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Despite the increasingly annoying presence of the mugging, fatuous Cuba Gooding Jr., The Fighting Temptations pulls off what feels like a major feat: Its musical sequences could make the most hardened atheist want to go to church.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The most interesting aspect of Danny Deckchair, though, may be that the film is based on the true story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Move over donkey, it's Banderas' time to shine.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Goes too far in its slapstick efforts to please mainstream audiences, but there's no denying the genuine appeal of -- and I can't believe I'm actually writing this -- Richard Gere and ballroom dancing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Doesn't feel quite so lengthy as its predecessor. And while it still falls short of becoming the classic fans so badly want it to be, the film is livelier and better overall than "The Sorcerer's Stone."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Wimbledon may have its faults, but it's the sort of upbeat fantasy that's tough to resist. Maybe love wins in tennis after all.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Huston, unfortunately, is never really believable as a man rediscovering lost principles; he feels out of place in this otherwise fine ensemble.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Garner may be a study in butt-kicking intensity on TV's Alias, but here, she's an engaging comic performer who more than carries her share of what is essentially an unoriginal, mostly average film.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The actors, aside from Sevani, were clearly not cast for their mad acting skills.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Though it's entertaining when the tone is light, The Joneses can't quite keep up with this sort of complexity.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    A poignant film punctuated with clumsy moments and a resolution that occurs far too abruptly.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Letters to Juliet will never be mistaken for an epic romance -- too light, too silly, too mistake-prone -- but the ingredients of its tasty chick-flick stew are tried and true.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    If you can overlook that last little bit of sports fantasy, you just might like Just Wright.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Easy A is unnecessarily hard on the religious kids. Unlike "Saved," it uses broad caricatures of gospel-singing fanatics to get laughs, and the bug-eyed, over-the-top performance by Bynes (who apparently really should have retired after making this film) doesn't help matters.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    This is a film about depression, though, and it comes awfully close to trivializing its subject by suggesting that all Craig needed, really, was a cute girl to like him back.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The film remains relatively entertaining, simply because the scenario hits so close to home, no matter where you work.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Unknown is never boring, and Collet-Serra mostly keeps up a lively pace, but he doesn't do the movie any favors with the flat, dull way he films the scene in which we finally learn what's going on.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    It's the sort of film that's entertaining while you're in the theater.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The film is never more than an amalgamation of other movies.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    By the time it's over, Insidious is less scary than a mortgage payment.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Thank Segal in part, because the guy is always funny, and Timberlake gets some of the biggest laughs in a particularly crude sex scene (though the song with which his character woos Miss Squirrel is perhaps the film's funniest moment).
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The second installment in a likable family franchise, Journey 2: The Mysterious Island makes a nice case to your kids that reading books is a good idea.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    In the end the film stacks up just this side of twee, as the sort of quirky fare that's passably entertaining without ever offering anything real or remarkable.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    It's full of lively and crude sexual banter, discussions of hookups and sex and Joel McHale's bare butt. Oddly, all this makes the film funnier and more accessible than you might imagine.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The Deep Blue Sea is a suffocating movie, and it's meant to be.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The humor tends to be broad, but the spritely pace doesn't allow for too much lingering on the jokes that don't land (really, we've seen enough morning sickness bits to make us gag).
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Snow Flower and the Secret Fan moves slowly, languidly; its art direction is often lovely, and despite their truncated screen time Lily and Snow Flower do make you care about their fates. But you would have cared more without all the distraction.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The Iron Lady never delves deeply enough into the politics or the people, preferring instead to make us feel bad about the unfortunate way in which old age levels us all.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The most fortunate thing about The Lucky One is that despite a plot hole so big it could generate its own gravity field, it's still not a bad movie.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    It's really just a dance movie, interrupted sporadically for PG-13 romance, bad acting, ridiculous dialogue and earnest "let's put on a show to save our homes!" spirit.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Not a bad movie - everybody wants dreams to come true - but its platitudes sound awfully hollow sometimes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Zombie lore doesn't allow for redemption, only head shots, and Levine's film, amusing though it may be, is never gory enough to truly become a classic zombie movie. It also ignores the one basic necessity of monster films, even the funny ones: It really ought to be creepy or scary or gross, at least once or twice.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Unfortunately, the film's climactic finale grows repetitive and goes on a little too long; once you've seen bodies flying and crashing through buildings once, you've seen it plenty.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Delicacy bears a slight whiff of Anthony Minghella's fantastic "Truly Madly Deeply," but while Minghella's film is a romantic comedy classic, Delicacy hovers just this side of memorable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Thoughtfully directed and co-written by Arie Posin, the film is not a ghost story, nor is it played for campy laughs, but its melodramatic subject matter flirts with Douglas Sirk territory — and sometimes just dives right into it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    42
    And still 42 persists in entertaining you, even when you’re cringing, because the real story is so compelling.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Once you get past the intriguing fact that although Whip's job puts hundreds of lives into his hands on a daily basis yet he's cavalier about protecting them, the movie doesn't feel much different than any other exploration of addiction.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Bayona is restrained here in terms of gore, but his landscape is a realistic vision of a hell we never hope to visit.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Curtis pulls off some amusing moments, and he has a secret weapon: Nighy, who is so jolly and funny you wish he’d had more screen time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The movie wanders off course in the final act, as if none of its three screenwriters could quite figure out how to end it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Pine, who has been so good and so instrumental in J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek series as Captain Kirk, turns out to be a decent Ryan.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    It’s filmed with a sharp eye and filled with good performances.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    A better primer-for-the-uninitiated than an in-depth, fresh and insightful examination of a famous and remarkable life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Unfinished Song is full of predictably poignant moments; you’d be lucky to survive the film dry-eyed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    A Hijacking is not quite as exciting as it should be, but its realistic examination of grit and folly are still more intriguing than swaggering action movie heroics.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    A decent thriller made better by good performances and an intriguing setting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Its flimsy plot can’t quite support all the characters stuffed into the script, and the movie plays out in a weirdly static way that makes it feel improvised and uneven, leaving a few too much time during which nothing funny is happening.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    Blended isn’t Sandler’s funniest movie or his best, but it is a big step up from the dregs he’s been churning out, a messy, shaggy dog of a comedy that you can’t help but like even as it sheds all over your house.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The undeniable star is the diminutive comedian. He’s the glue that holds the movie together when it wanders into the weeds and starts believing it’s a serious meditation on relationships.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    It still feels a little like a lesson you’re supposed to learn before you can enjoy anything truly satisfying.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    The concert scenes in this biographical picture are some of its best moments — you’ll wonder just how long the actor had to practice to perfect all those splits — and Boseman’s charisma is irresistible.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Connie Ogle
    That rare biopic that’s shorter and swifter than it should be. This turns out to be both a blessing and a curse.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    A well-acted, well-crafted but excruciatingly tepid romantic film about a subject that will attract poetry lovers and yet test even their considerable patience.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    While there are some genuinely creepy moments, it never truly ends up as more than an average "X-Files" episode.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    An incredibly lazy movie -- but not an unbearable one, thanks to Aaron Eckhart's charm.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    You won't necessarily applaud The Notebook's excesses, but its final moments of grace will leave you in a sodden heap on the theater floor.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    You might call My Sister's Keeper manipulative, and you would not be inaccurate.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    The problem -- aside from the fact that one of the best things about Foer's story is its irreverent, intricate, just-maybe-brilliant writing -- is what Schreiber has decided to cut.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Its frights are not that chilling or original, its secrets more run-of-the-mill than astounding.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Unlike Uncle Nino's garden, the film never blooms into anything special.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Don't expect perfection, and you'll emerge from this goofy movie all in one piece, with reasonably entertained kids and a milder headache.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    From the first strains of its overly dramatic, self-important score -- come on, this is not by any stretch of the imagination "Citizen Kane."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    The cast, which includes Kim Cattrall (Sex and the City) as a coach who pushes her daughter too hard, is likable and energetic, and the film's messages are entirely reasonable.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    The film, bound to bore the socks off impatient viewers, mistakes reserve for depth and ends up hamstringing its talented cast into playing characters you never care about all that much.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    The good news is the updated version is scarier than the original, thanks to snazzier special effects, a shorter running time, moody lighting, a few solid jolts and one icky moment involving a bratty babysitter and a closet. The bad news is the film rehashes every horror movie cliché you can imagine.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Solondz's determinedly removed eye for the graphic and shocking is by now practically a cliche. If Solondz really wants to outrage anyone, he'll have to make a sweet and heartfelt drama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    The film's opening credits are terrific, and the first 10 or 15 minutes -- in which Ford and Arthur speedily load up on beer at the local pub -- are absorbing and funny. It's such a promising start that it's doubly deflating to realize that once they land on Zaphod's spaceship, the humor vaporizes.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Neither scary nor thrilling, although it's reasonably entertaining despite an abundance of haunted-house clichés, the usual inexplicable scary-movie behavior and an almost-naked John Hurt.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    The sins of the inspirational Saint Ralph are venial, but they undeniably prevent the small Canadian film from stretching beyond the boundaries of an After School Special.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Allegedly it's based on a true story, which is believable only because the outcome is so unsatisfying it carries the dull metallic tang of real-life ambiguity. And that's neither scary nor stimulating.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    In the thriller Into the Blue, the Bahamian waters dazzle the eye. They are breathtaking and welcoming, possessing mysterious depths. The same cannot be said for the film's stars, Paul Walker and Jessica Alba, who are every bit as gorgeous as the scenery but not quite so profound.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Features one of the more pointless cameos ever when Tom Waits shows up abruptly in the desert to spout mystical nonsense about Domino trading her life for somebody else's. The scene has absolutely no place in this jarring, violent movie; Waits is just another of Scott's distractions.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Antonio Banderas looks a little older, Catherine Zeta-Jones snares a bigger role, and the powerful charms of both are weighed down by an absurdly plot-heavy script.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Rapidly devolves into a pedestrian thriller in which almost nobody behaves in a recognizably human way.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Casanova doesn't seduce so much as lull the audience into a stupor with tedious blather about the battle of the sexes, intermittent but pointless swordplay and clumsy slapstick.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    A tepid sort of romantic comedy, with lengthy stretches during which nothing much happens punctuated by bouts of paralyzing boredom or, on rare occasions, random but fleeting hilarity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    For most U.S. audiences, Sophie Scholl: The Final Days, an Academy Award nominee for best foreign language film, is going to feel more like a history lesson than a movie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Shockingly, it's an understated but amusing Ferrell who keeps Winter Passing from growing unbearable.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    The girls who adore the likable Everygirl Bynes will find a lot to enjoy about the film, especially the boys who look as though they just were lounging around the Abercrombie & Fitch catalog.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    It's possible to achieve hilarity and pathos, but it's not easy, and Litvak isn't quite skilled enough to make the sex jokes rest easily beside the final grandiose and pat confessions. As a result, When Do We Eat? merely whets your appetite for a fresh take on family matters.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    It's a disappointing chapter in what until now has been a highly entertaining, even thought-provoking series.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    A sporadically funny, always predictable, weirdly downbeat fantasy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Connie Ogle
    Overall, the film's sheer mediocrity prevents Thurman from flying to its rescue.

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