For 101 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Cynthia Fuchs' Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Flag: Season 1
Lowest review score: 30 Mental: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 35 out of 101
  2. Negative: 6 out of 101
101 tv reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    Celia is facing some judgment of her own this season. Her not-entirely separate saga makes up the other half of Weeds‘ new start, such that the show is cleaved down its center, cutting awkwardly back and forth between Celia now imprisoned and Nancy fancy-free.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Cynthia Fuchs
    While The Flag ponders the whereabouts of Shirley and Spiro’s flag, it raises other, broader, variously resonant questions too, questions concerning how symbols and icons become significant, as well as how stories are told and myths are disseminated.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Cynthia Fuchs
    Treme sketches and interweaves stories and desires, hopes and disenchantments.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    In its insistence on the chaos of battles and the confusion of downtime, the series also offers another “harsh reality,” that these decent men are exploited by their faceless government, again and again. If this story is not explicit in the bloody surface of The Pacific, it is a persistent, distressing undercurrent.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    Paul’s sessions this time around are sometimes soapy--as they were last year--but they are always mesmerizing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    If the premise is standard--an excellent cop is dragged back in, just when she's headed out, in this case, from the Northwest's renowned rain to California's sunshine--the details are insistently odd and creepy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    There are a few elements of Silicon Valley that are still works in progress at this point. The force of Miller’s personality can be overwhelming, and a little of Erlich goes a long way.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    The perversity of this connection cannot be overstated (Smits makes Miguel both charismatic and creepy, often in the same breath). Dexter sees it, though he also yearns for the friendship, the brotherhood, even.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    Like Wright’s book, the series is disjointed and disturbing, a story of youthful workers who are underprepared, underequipped, and underinformed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    The particulars of the transition involve the usual melodrama, as each regular cast member has a chance to express his or her feelings about Grissom’s departure, however pissy or mundane.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    Weight of the Nation encourages viewers to feel responsible for their own lives and to make informed choices.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    It does tend to love its sublimely self-confident hero, a quick draw and a smartass who nonetheless walks a sort of moral line that baffles his mostly rube-ish opponents. But the show offers other, pleasures that help to make up for what's predictable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Cynthia Fuchs
    At the same time [Eros Hoagland is taking pictures], his process is also the subject of a picture--shaped in part by the remarkable work of photographer and cinematographer Jared Moossy, who shoots all four episodes of Witness--a picture that shows both context and effect, the sort of broad view that might emerge from the most specific images.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    Valentine Road features a range of interview subjects who voice conflicting concerns and express their discontents, but it also resists casting judgment against one person or another.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Cynthia Fuchs
    On Freddie Roach [is] Peter Berg's extraordinary six-part HBO series.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Cynthia Fuchs
    Herzog listens and interjects his own helpfully perverse insights.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    As much as the series' pitch seems clear--it's another period series, with terrific design details, long story arcs, and complex performances--it is also something else, a reframing of what it might mean to be Americans, then and now.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    The soap operatic set-up is both efficient and florid, laying out both familial continuity and class distinctions.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    Much like last season, this one already has Adams and Ben standing in for viewers. Their insights, or their reactions, mold yours.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    Even as all of these seeming oppositions are set up, the show insists on the blurring of lines, the bridges as well as the borders.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    The actor’s embodiment of seemingly counterintuitive emotions is riveting, as House’s placidity demonstrates sorrow, while anger represents a kind of giddy id. Even if House isn’t offering new stories or themes, it remains a terrific showcase for a terrific performer.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The series doesn’t mean to dig deeply into contemporary African social problems or politics, instead, it offers up middlebrow mysteries that can be solved in an episode’s time, a heroine who is keenly observant and positively feminine, a vague sort of half-step forward from Nancy Drew or Jessica Fletcher.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Even as this plot pattern bodes ill, Margulies and Panjabi make a formidable team.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    By turns treacly and rapturous, pedestrian and insightful, the documentary submits that, as Howard Bryant observes, "Most people have found a way to make their peace with the sport they love." Still, the history rankles. And here, too much of it is noted only briefly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    As before, the “big picture” plotlines are often the least convincing, mostly because the trippy angel talk is tough to pull off.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    Terriers teases out both the pleasures and the perversities.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    Interactions are rendered in smart, layered compositions, with elements that crowd and obscure, colors that distract and focus your attention. Such plot intricacies might appear contrived, but twisting even in the first episode suggests otherwise.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    If it’s not an ingenious or very new device (see: Nina, Tony, Curtis, et. al.), the damaged soul who is Jack’s Self Reflected re-raises and continues to complicate the questions that are typically understood as resolved in Jack. Patriotism and heroism, bad choices and hideous torture in the name of a big picture: it’s 24 repeating.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    While the particulars of these cases are not uninteresting, they are mostly lost amid the swirl of Jerry and Michelle’s careening between romance and competition, betrayal and “crossing the line.”
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    What is abundantly clear by this brutal, swift, and exquisitely yucky scene is True Blood is back, doing what it likes to do best, that is, dumping you into yet another crisis with precious little context or buildup.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    This idea--that Sam is experiencing his coma as an “alternate reality” via a TV show--is wickedly clever. It’s a question as to whether Life on Mars can sustain and develop this idea, which is really an investigation of limits.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    This effort to bring Sarah’s Chronicles both back and forward to our current moment is both awkward and smart.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Tell Me You Love Me begins within confines, its white, middle class, straight couples all dealing with versions of the same problem. That this focus might be "real" is not the question. More troubling, for a series banking on its newness, is that the focus is so familiar.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    It's an ingenious first two minutes of a series premiere, actiony and exciting and legible enough.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    It is returning to its own past, that most effective masculine melodrama. Two, it is making that return meta, arranging plot points to emphasize official repetitions and narrative redundancies. And three, it is yet again making torture its most salient focus.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    When Tara and Sookie speak truth to each other (or seem to), True Blood is almost shrewd.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    Dani of the Perfectly Tousled Locks watches Charlie for the rest of us, her responses shaping ours.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    C.S.I.: Miami is very slick, very clever, and very eager to please.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    The hallmark of all three films has been their understanding and embrace of subjects' self-presentations./
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    True, the episode threatened to jump the shark when it was revealed that James (Patrick Heusinger), the unsuspecting man Blair corralled to play of the part of her wonderful new boyfriend, had his own secret, ludicrous even by Gossip Girl standards. But in the coming episodes, Blair and Chuck retain their place as the series’ most exciting kids in turmoil, its salacious center.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    This sort of banter takes up a good portion of the Castle premiere episode, each instance of it reinforcing the always-already familiar premise.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The series has laid groundwork for minor and mostly predictable complications.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Cynthia Fuchs
    Even the flashy action is of a piece with all this conventional structuring, as Chance regularly takes a few minutes to run and jump or punch and shoot. Such predictability does Human Target no favors.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    The connections are sudden, relationships shallow, and dialogue glib.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    In HBO's miniseries Mildred Pierce, beginning on 27 March, she embodies the sort of ambition and resilience that might seem ideal during a depression-or even a great recession. That is, she's a function of her time (the one first imagined for her by James M. Cain) as well as ours.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    While the interviewees here can look back and put pieces together, fragmentation and lack of focus may be Gettysburg's most authentic effect.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    As George W. Bush describes his thinking on September 11, it's hard not to wonder, well, what he was thinking. It's a mystery that remains unanswered in George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    It's more subtly, and more forcefully too, a quest for understanding, specifically an understanding of how the world works.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    The film is about effects--about anger and guilt, pain and exasperation. It's about that "wish to remember" and also to know, or even just to be able to live with not knowing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    The formula set in motion by the Fringe pilot is familiar. That’s not to say it’s not also devious and often delightful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    Again and again, Ethel insists she doesn't like to "talk about" her self, doesn't like to be introspective. And so the film offers images for the rest of us to parse, public performances that may or may not reveal what we want to see.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    As the series continues to complicate the relations among past, present, and future, Ellison’s part in any of them is increasingly difficult to frame.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    It’s this credibility that makes The Beast go. Even when the show trots out cliches (rainy nights, junkie informants and strippers, a pretty blond neighbor/love interest for Ellis [Rose, played by Lindsay Pulsipher]), Charlie is compelling, his many performances jaggedy and surprising, his rhythms weird, his sense of humor entertainingly bleak.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    Forceful but also vulnerable, flawed and brilliant, Liz is plagued by her self-righteousness and, judging by a couple of episodes, the show is plagued by her rightness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    More often, the show is a show: the camera cranes out to show Cathy's loneliness, the half-hour closes with a bittersweet pop song or the point is made too obviously ("Cancer's not a passport to a better life, cancer's the reason I'm not gonna have a life"). Still, the show does illustrate a useful idea, that what you think is "normal" is only that, what you think.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    As the film's "50 state road trip" reveals the multiplicity of these experiences, it shows as well that some "freedoms" have costs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    Assuming that you share its sense of outrage at what Jim Baker and Supremes wrought (in a decision they declared a one-off, not applicable to any future rulings), the movie offers easy targets and conclusions. But to intimate there was a way to “win” if only everyone had played fair, Recount has to back off the entrenched problems and the more horrific conclusion, that the system is rigged and no matter who plays it, the end is the same.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Patrick dramatizes his sense of superiority, intimidating and irritating just about anyone who comes in contact with him....The Mentalist does offer its own charms, chief among them Baker’s low-key, apparently complicated sarcasm.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    At once schematic and preachy, it never indicates the stakes--either for its “diverse” players or for you.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    Sleeper Cell is compelling television primarily for its excellent performances and chilling premises, rather than its plots. Alarming as these may be, they are rendered here with predictable rising and falling action, a bit of romance, and some tidily resolved conflicts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    Details of color and composition do the work usually handled by too much expository dialogue, granting access to Dani and Charlie’s thinking.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Lie to Me offers well-designed (and repeatedly, very white) interiors, utterly formulaic scripting, and familiar characters.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Cavanagh and McCormack bring what you know they will--an effective mix of fast talk and easy delivery to pitch the partners’ situations, which range from silly to predictable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    The show's formula looks to be this: the silly plots swirl, the brokers scheme, and the minions toil, but in each episode, Liv finds a moment to chat with one of these wise, powerful, and inevitably troubled women. In these moments, Scandal is slightly less tabloidy and soapy, and slightly more beguiling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    The shaman contrivance is surely tedious, but it appears that New Amsterdam uses the immortal design not as a way to Forrest-Gump its protagonist into a set of trite historical situations, but more cleverly, to ask questions about those situations.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    It helps that Bell is able to suggest complexity, emotional and moral, even when the dialogue fails her.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    It’s not new or challenging or even very strange. It is, however, plenty quirky.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    It’s especially good when the mission is as preposterous as this one. True to Prison Break form, the new season is laid out as a series of tasks, the retrieval of The Company’s most vital information, stored on what is essentially a digital black book (as opposed to hole).
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    For its part, House of Saddam provides little insight into Saddam Hussein. Instead, it repeats truisms about well-reported events, many of them best remembered as TV images.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    Yes, Rizzoli & Isles is quick with cliches....[But] for all the stereotyping, it's hard to be mad at Angie Harmon.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    Drawing parallels between the city’s decadence and that of its inhabitants is a fairly obvious point to make, so using it for more than just establishing shots is overkill, specifically pulling the viewer out of emotional moments. It’s a small quibble, though, and thankfully, the only complaint about this new season so far.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    The series proceeds to follow Jenny’s remarkably bland course of revelation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    This is pretty much how it goes on Chicagoland: Emmanuel against everyone else.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    The film offers a version of the real Mitt, performative and authentic, charming and awkward, occasionally at the same time.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    Even as Dollhouse sounds like other TV shows and movies, it is also utterly strange, its premise literally ridiculous and intriguingly metaphorical.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    The girls, though, look promising. Granted, the initial Sarah-Jamie fight scene occasions the series’ first spectacular special-effectsy scene.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    Yet another medical-mystery-forensics drama set in a large American city.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    That Bo’s gifts remain somewhat beyond her control or comprehension makes her a puzzle but also predictable. Bo will indeed be on a winding road, as she must be just a bit of a person who will irritate and mystify her jokester-action-hero protector, as she must seem both odd and sympathetic to the adults watching her, in her world and in yours.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    To ensure you understand the magnitude of all this emotional mayhem, Maddux helpfully narrates in generically navel-gazing voiceover.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Cynthia Fuchs
    The dynamic here is already tired.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The show piles on plot and cliché. You know too much already. And yet, watching her, you realize you can never know enough.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Hood’s methods are unconventional, Eleventh Hour insists, but still, he’s strangely bland.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    As much as they have at stake, neither Vince nor Dana is as much fun to watch as Max. Master of the arched eyebrow and the sly grin, Max is better than a circus act.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Intra-team melodrama doesn't distract from the film's focus so much as it illustrates it: again and again, the boys declare their need for payback.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    [The show has] married the procedural to melodrama, with occasionally intriguing results.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Cynthia Fuchs
    His being stuck there no matter who shows up, in addition to his out-of-joint flashbacks, makes Crusoe seem something like a proto-Survivor contestant or, weirder, a proto-cast member on Lost. None of this bodes especially well for the series, in terms of repetition and limitation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    Happy Town‘s rhythm is like that, pitching between the obvious and the obscure. It’s not yet clear where it’s “snap sharp.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    These cases don't come together so much as they suggest a formula.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    A little tedious for the rest of us, who have seen such exploration before.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Flashpoint works through the distress and damage it lays out here, it gets points for beginning with the difficulty, not with the triumph. Now, if it can just figure a way beyond the scary perp clichés.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The show has been notoriously slow in setting up the plot everyone knows already. While the pokey details have included the protracted not-quite-romance between Erica and Father Jack (Joel Gretsch) and the precise loyalties of black-ops and terrorism expert Hobbes (Charles Mesure), the new year brings at least a veneer of urgency.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    The trouble is, they don't surprise you. Their routes to redemption are laid out early and often.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Cynthia Fuchs
    Like the Osbournes, Whitney and Bobby, the Simmons, the Kardashians, and the Hammers, they perform themselves: they talk to the camera, they act out, they make complain and look to score points.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    The show seems aware of the questions raised by this narrative dynamic, but hasn't sorted out a way to do more than note them.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    You might be thankful that Sam has explained his job, with so many un-blocked metaphors, if you've never seen a show like Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior before. But because you've seen too many shows like this and too many teams like his, you're unimpressed. You're already too many steps ahead.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Cynthia Fuchs
    Jack delivers to every brilliant-offbeat doctor expectation, which means that for all his hyper-performative charms, Jack is also tedious, right down to the zipper in his forehead that marks commercial breaks.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    Hopper [is] so misfitted for this role that he seems perversely perfect.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Like so many plot turns in Outlaw, this one is too convenient, too silly, and not a little audacious. It helps that the show knows it.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    The show is, in various ways, just such a trick, not quite convincing viewers that its shtick is authentic, but granting that those viewers get the joke (and will forgive, and even enjoy, the cheesy results).