Cynthia Fuchs

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For 113 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Cynthia Fuchs' Scores

Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Flag
Lowest review score: 30 Mental: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 43 out of 113
  2. Negative: 6 out of 113
113 tv reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    If it’s not an ingenious or very new device (see: Nina, Tony, Curtis, et. al.), the damaged soul who is Jack’s Self Reflected re-raises and continues to complicate the questions that are typically understood as resolved in Jack. Patriotism and heroism, bad choices and hideous torture in the name of a big picture: it’s 24 repeating.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    While the particulars of these cases are not uninteresting, they are mostly lost amid the swirl of Jerry and Michelle’s careening between romance and competition, betrayal and “crossing the line.”
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    What is abundantly clear by this brutal, swift, and exquisitely yucky scene is True Blood is back, doing what it likes to do best, that is, dumping you into yet another crisis with precious little context or buildup.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    This effort to bring Sarah’s Chronicles both back and forward to our current moment is both awkward and smart.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    This idea--that Sam is experiencing his coma as an “alternate reality” via a TV show--is wickedly clever. It’s a question as to whether Life on Mars can sustain and develop this idea, which is really an investigation of limits.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    It's an ingenious first two minutes of a series premiere, actiony and exciting and legible enough.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Tell Me You Love Me begins within confines, its white, middle class, straight couples all dealing with versions of the same problem. That this focus might be "real" is not the question. More troubling, for a series banking on its newness, is that the focus is so familiar.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    It is returning to its own past, that most effective masculine melodrama. Two, it is making that return meta, arranging plot points to emphasize official repetitions and narrative redundancies. And three, it is yet again making torture its most salient focus.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    The hallmark of all three films has been their understanding and embrace of subjects' self-presentations./
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    When Tara and Sookie speak truth to each other (or seem to), True Blood is almost shrewd.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    The series takes some time to put this team together, even in the same area of New York. And while you’re waiting for that plot turn, you’re treated to a series of lurid images, from yucky to jolting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    Dani of the Perfectly Tousled Locks watches Charlie for the rest of us, her responses shaping ours.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    C.S.I.: Miami is very slick, very clever, and very eager to please.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    This sort of banter takes up a good portion of the Castle premiere episode, each instance of it reinforcing the always-already familiar premise.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The series has laid groundwork for minor and mostly predictable complications.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    He anticipates pretty much every move made against him, as you might as well, given that they’re made by people designed to remind you of previous people in Jack’s universe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 Cynthia Fuchs
    Even the flashy action is of a piece with all this conventional structuring, as Chance regularly takes a few minutes to run and jump or punch and shoot. Such predictability does Human Target no favors.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Cynthia Fuchs
    In HBO's miniseries Mildred Pierce, beginning on 27 March, she embodies the sort of ambition and resilience that might seem ideal during a depression-or even a great recession. That is, she's a function of her time (the one first imagined for her by James M. Cain) as well as ours.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    While the interviewees here can look back and put pieces together, fragmentation and lack of focus may be Gettysburg's most authentic effect.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    The connections are sudden, relationships shallow, and dialogue glib.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    True, the episode threatened to jump the shark when it was revealed that James (Patrick Heusinger), the unsuspecting man Blair corralled to play of the part of her wonderful new boyfriend, had his own secret, ludicrous even by Gossip Girl standards. But in the coming episodes, Blair and Chuck retain their place as the series’ most exciting kids in turmoil, its salacious center.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    It's more subtly, and more forcefully too, a quest for understanding, specifically an understanding of how the world works.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    As George W. Bush describes his thinking on September 11, it's hard not to wonder, well, what he was thinking. It's a mystery that remains unanswered in George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    Again and again, Ethel insists she doesn't like to "talk about" her self, doesn't like to be introspective. And so the film offers images for the rest of us to parse, public performances that may or may not reveal what we want to see.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    You’re left to wonder about what she sees, or whether she believes what she sees, a set of questions that might be intriguing (watching her distraught face as she watches herself) or annoying (watching her vaguely worried face as she spots a stranger at the end of her driveway in the dead of night).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    The formula set in motion by the Fringe pilot is familiar. That’s not to say it’s not also devious and often delightful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    The film is about effects--about anger and guilt, pain and exasperation. It's about that "wish to remember" and also to know, or even just to be able to live with not knowing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    More often, the show is a show: the camera cranes out to show Cathy's loneliness, the half-hour closes with a bittersweet pop song or the point is made too obviously ("Cancer's not a passport to a better life, cancer's the reason I'm not gonna have a life"). Still, the show does illustrate a useful idea, that what you think is "normal" is only that, what you think.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Cynthia Fuchs
    As before, The Bridge loses its own focus frequently, sliding off into multiple storylines that follow pairs of characters, some less interesting than others, some downright distracting. But for all the time that feels misspent on Charlotte and her idiot boyfriend Ray (Brian Van Holt) or the self-deluding addict reporter Frye (Matthew Lillard) and his long-suffering partner Adriana (Emily Rios), The Bridge offers brief moments that resonate and sometimes, even chill.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    As the series continues to complicate the relations among past, present, and future, Ellison’s part in any of them is increasingly difficult to frame.

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