For 106 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Cynthia Fuchs' Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Flag: Season 1
Lowest review score: 30 Human Target: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 39 out of 106
  2. Negative: 6 out of 106
106 tv reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    By turns treacly and rapturous, pedestrian and insightful, the documentary submits that, as Howard Bryant observes, "Most people have found a way to make their peace with the sport they love." Still, the history rankles. And here, too much of it is noted only briefly.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    As the film's "50 state road trip" reveals the multiplicity of these experiences, it shows as well that some "freedoms" have costs.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    The show's formula looks to be this: the silly plots swirl, the brokers scheme, and the minions toil, but in each episode, Liv finds a moment to chat with one of these wise, powerful, and inevitably troubled women. In these moments, Scandal is slightly less tabloidy and soapy, and slightly more beguiling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    It's an ingenious first two minutes of a series premiere, actiony and exciting and legible enough.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    This is pretty much how it goes on Chicagoland: Emmanuel against everyone else.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Cynthia Fuchs
    You’re left to wonder about what she sees, or whether she believes what she sees, a set of questions that might be intriguing (watching her distraught face as she watches herself) or annoying (watching her vaguely worried face as she spots a stranger at the end of her driveway in the dead of night).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The series has laid groundwork for minor and mostly predictable complications.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Tell Me You Love Me begins within confines, its white, middle class, straight couples all dealing with versions of the same problem. That this focus might be "real" is not the question. More troubling, for a series banking on its newness, is that the focus is so familiar.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    While the particulars of these cases are not uninteresting, they are mostly lost amid the swirl of Jerry and Michelle’s careening between romance and competition, betrayal and “crossing the line.”
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    A little tedious for the rest of us, who have seen such exploration before.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Patrick dramatizes his sense of superiority, intimidating and irritating just about anyone who comes in contact with him....The Mentalist does offer its own charms, chief among them Baker’s low-key, apparently complicated sarcasm.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Flashpoint works through the distress and damage it lays out here, it gets points for beginning with the difficulty, not with the triumph. Now, if it can just figure a way beyond the scary perp clichés.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The series doesn’t mean to dig deeply into contemporary African social problems or politics, instead, it offers up middlebrow mysteries that can be solved in an episode’s time, a heroine who is keenly observant and positively feminine, a vague sort of half-step forward from Nancy Drew or Jessica Fletcher.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Hood’s methods are unconventional, Eleventh Hour insists, but still, he’s strangely bland.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Cavanagh and McCormack bring what you know they will--an effective mix of fast talk and easy delivery to pitch the partners’ situations, which range from silly to predictable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    This sort of banter takes up a good portion of the Castle premiere episode, each instance of it reinforcing the always-already familiar premise.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    You might be thankful that Sam has explained his job, with so many un-blocked metaphors, if you've never seen a show like Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior before. But because you've seen too many shows like this and too many teams like his, you're unimpressed. You're already too many steps ahead.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    For its part, House of Saddam provides little insight into Saddam Hussein. Instead, it repeats truisms about well-reported events, many of them best remembered as TV images.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Lie to Me offers well-designed (and repeatedly, very white) interiors, utterly formulaic scripting, and familiar characters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Even as this plot pattern bodes ill, Margulies and Panjabi make a formidable team.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    To ensure you understand the magnitude of all this emotional mayhem, Maddux helpfully narrates in generically navel-gazing voiceover.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Like so many plot turns in Outlaw, this one is too convenient, too silly, and not a little audacious. It helps that the show knows it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    More often, the show is a show: the camera cranes out to show Cathy's loneliness, the half-hour closes with a bittersweet pop song or the point is made too obviously ("Cancer's not a passport to a better life, cancer's the reason I'm not gonna have a life"). Still, the show does illustrate a useful idea, that what you think is "normal" is only that, what you think.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The show has been notoriously slow in setting up the plot everyone knows already. While the pokey details have included the protracted not-quite-romance between Erica and Father Jack (Joel Gretsch) and the precise loyalties of black-ops and terrorism expert Hobbes (Charles Mesure), the new year brings at least a veneer of urgency.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    As much as they have at stake, neither Vince nor Dana is as much fun to watch as Max. Master of the arched eyebrow and the sly grin, Max is better than a circus act.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    These cases don't come together so much as they suggest a formula.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    Intra-team melodrama doesn't distract from the film's focus so much as it illustrates it: again and again, the boys declare their need for payback.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    The show piles on plot and cliché. You know too much already. And yet, watching her, you realize you can never know enough.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Cynthia Fuchs
    That Bo’s gifts remain somewhat beyond her control or comprehension makes her a puzzle but also predictable. Bo will indeed be on a winding road, as she must be just a bit of a person who will irritate and mystify her jokester-action-hero protector, as she must seem both odd and sympathetic to the adults watching her, in her world and in yours.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Cynthia Fuchs
    At once schematic and preachy, it never indicates the stakes--either for its “diverse” players or for you.