For 60 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 All Is Lost
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 60
  2. Negative: 6 out of 60
60 movie reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Qualifies as one of my favorite movies of all time. This 1932 masterpiece, now digitally restored with retranslated subtitles and a newly recorded score, is a silent film that doesn't feel silent at all.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The movie we've been waiting for all year: a comedy that doesn't take cheap shots, a drama that doesn't manipulate, a movie of ideas that doesn't preach. It's a rich, layered, juicy film, with quiet revelations punctuated by big laughs.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The way that Redford’s character — who for all his namelessness and near-wordlessness emerges as a distinct character, a calm, pragmatic, curious man with a dry sense of humor — struggles with that ultimate question is the beating heart of All is Lost, which somewhere in its second hour goes from being a good movie to being a great one.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    A near-perfect piece of popular entertainment, a children's classic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    If nothing else, it's an eye-boggling two hours at the movies and a must for Swinton completists fascinated by her recent turn toward operatic roles in odd, unmarketable films like this one and last year's Julia. She's becoming the Maria Callas of international cinema.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    No
    It’s the rare political satire that can sound the depths of irony as No does and still end on a note of ambivalent hope.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It’s a stunningly assured debut, a slyly subversive delight, and one of my favorite movies of the year so far.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It’s the unhappiest happy ending I’ve ever seen, a moment that makes you weep not just for this one man who found his way back to freedom, but for all those men and women who never knew it in the first place.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    If you're willing to let go of your Hollywood-bred expectations for a movie of this type-spectacular action set pieces, constant pulse-pounding music, a killing every 15 minutes-The American is a great pleasure to watch, an astringent antidote to the loud, frantic action movies that have been clogging our veins all summer.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The film's best moments are the quiet ones in which Oldman's ironically named Smiley provides the story with its wise, unsmiling soul.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Though its story may sound formulaic on paper, please take my word for it: Monsieur Lazhar, written and directed by Philippe Falardeau, is a sharply intelligent, deeply sad, and not remotely sappy film about both teaching and collective grief.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It's a rollicking children's entertainment, gorgeously animated and wittily cast, and also an unusually astute exploration of the complex bond between mothers and daughters, a relationship that's often either elided or sentimentalized in children's literature and film.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The Master is above all a love story between Joaquin Phoenix's damaged WWII vet, Freddie Quell, and Philip Seymour Hoffmann's charismatic charlatan, Lancaster Dodd. And that relationship is powerful and funny and twisted and strange enough that maybe that's all the movie needs to be about.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    In the quietly devastating Amour, Haneke's cool, dispassionate gaze feels, for the first time, something like love.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Linklater may not have set out to make a decade-spanning triptych of poetic meditations on youth, young adulthood, and middle age, but he, Hawke, and Delpy have accomplished exactly that. The Before series has steadily gotten better as it goes along, which is more than any but the most optimistic among us dare to hope for from love.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This Much Ado About Nothing — while perhaps not an adaptation for the ages in every respect — is as bracingly effervescent as picnic champagne.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A wonderful movie, observant and hilarious and full of sad and beautiful truths.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This is not to say that Gravity is a masterpiece: Unlike Cuarón’s extraordinary "Children of Men", it doesn’t quite pull off its ambitious effort to combine formal inventiveness, heart-pounding action, and intimate human storytelling. But it succeeds thrillingly at the first two of those categories, and only misses the mark on the last because it tries a little too hard — which is certainly a welcome respite from the countless sci-fi thrillers that privilege the human story not at all.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This is a movie that traffics in deep hindbrain emotions: fear and rage and lust and, above all, the pure animal drive to go on living.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Like "Spartacus," this movie is engaging because it's actually about something: the love of learning, the clash between science and religious faith, and the grim fact that political change often proceeds on the foundation of mob violence and genocide. Agora engages more effectively with this kind of big historical idea than it does with human drama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It's a question of whether or not the movie speaks to your secret, unregulated, inherently ridiculous experience of identification and desire--not who you should be, but who you are. Does the warm blood of a teenager still flow beneath your icy grown-up flesh?
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    At the end of Inception, I hadn't lived through the grueling emotional journey Nolan seemed to think I had, but I'd seen a bunch of cool images and admired some technically ambitious feats of filmmaking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Of all the twists in Catfish-the most surprising of all is what an honest and thoughtful film it turns out, against all odds, to be.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    What emerges from the chaos may be uneven and at times ridiculous, but it's never boring.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It's the movie's affectionate portrait of female friendship, along with Miller and Graynor's loose, playful performances, that make this whole imperfect soufflé rise as high as it does.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Bachelorette places a trio of women front and center who are so irredeemably loathsome, it's kind of refreshing. At least until a conventional third-act redemption undercuts some of the movie's sharpest insights and funniest jokes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Like most haunted-house stories, Mama gets steadily less scary as its (for the most part, fairly predictable) secrets unfold. But even if the beats are familiar, Muschietti sustains a remarkable mood throughout: wintry, elemental and stark, like a late Sylvia Plath poem.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Given how efficiently World War Z has delivered jolts and screams over the course of its sleek 116-minute running time, it’s easy to forgive this rushed and slightly muted finale.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Though this is a sweet, clever, gorgeously animated movie I’d be glad to take my kid to on a Saturday afternoon, I’m not sure it’s one I’d insist all my grownup friends drop what they’re doing to see.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    If I had a child near Dre's age, I'd drag him or her out of "Marmaduke" and into The Karate Kid--but not before requiring an at-home screening of the still unsurpassed original.