For 1,134 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Babadook
Lowest review score: 0 Just Go with It
Score distribution:
1134 movie reviews
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It's a clever idea bogged down in sophomoric sloppiness. Sitting through it doesn't feel like eternal damnation, but it's not exactly heaven, either. It's a $9.50 tour of adolescent purgatory.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    As fizzy as the first, but not quite as refreshing. The pleasurable, eye-popping sense of surprise has diminished, and the teasingly referential attitude shows signs of fatigue.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The feel-good movie of the year.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Though its story is fuzzy, the acting and direction in Final give it an air of quiet, dignified ambition.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    That they're English and elderly apparently makes their antics screamingly funny to people who would turn up their noses at similar humor in a film like "Scary Movie."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The time is right for a breezy, captivating New York romantic comedy. Sidewalks of New York is not an especially good movie, but it will do.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The sheer scale of the production, and the size of the venue, make the film interesting to watch.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    An easygoing exercise, impossible to dislike but not especially memorable, engaging but finally derivative:
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Leconte's visual instincts are so impressive that they outstrip his story, leaving us flushed and dazzled, but also, as after a long night of champagne and baccarat (to say nothing of other irresponsible pleasures), hungry, tired, and homesick.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Immerses you in violence and agony, but it may leave you with a curious feeling of detachment.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Even though Love's Labour's Lost is, in showbiz terms, a turkey stuffed with chestnuts, you wouldn't trade it for a pot of gold.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Its subject matter is intrinsically upsetting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It's a bit like "The Sixth Sense," but without the melodramatic comfort of the supernatural.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Kang is a gifted choreographer of bloody chaos, but he has enough range and imagination to strew a few interludes of haunting tenderness amid the shell casings and ketchup packs.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The general talent and dedication of the ensemble mitigate the script's occasional lapses into sentimentality and noisy confrontation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It doles out information so arbitrarily that you are robbed of the twin pleasures of figuring out clues and figuring out you've been fooled.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The main problem with Such a Long Journey is its storytelling. There is simply too much happening.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The brusque realism of Kragh-Jacobsen's style -- his careful suppression of style -- allows a surprising sweetness to emerge.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Somehow, in spite of the stunning vistas and some witty and affecting moments, the story seems to unfold at a distance; the human drama is diminished by the setting rather than amplified by it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Finds a sprawling, vivid middle ground somewhere between documentary and myth.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    There is a lot of violence, but not much action; a plot involving vengeance, jealousy and double-crossing, but not a great deal of suspense.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The film's resolute indifference to fashion makes it, perhaps paradoxically, a refreshing piece of old-style entertainment, accompanied by a whooshing, trembling score by Edward Shearmur.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Though the director's jet-set fantasy world of rugged jewel thieves and sailboat races, triste cabaret singers and sybaritic pleasures may feel dated and more than a little decadent, it is a nice enough place to visit.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Too much seriousness can be fatal to a picture like this one, since it impedes the efficient delivery of dumb laughter and easy thrills.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The movie is a little claustrophobic -- a marathon of conference calls, frenzied pointing and clicking, and office pep talks.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Reasonably well-executed thriller. It suffers not from awkwardness or silliness, which would make it more fun, but rather from its air-brushed, expensive pretentiousness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A hallucinatory tour de force of color, perspective and scale, virtually encapsulates the history of Japanese animation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Except perhaps for Lux, who, like The Virgin Suicides itself, is a hothouse flower perishing for want of sunshine and fresh air.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    By the end, instead of feeling stirred to a high pitch of anxiety and excitement, you may feel battered and worn down. But not, in the end, too terribly disappointed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    By the end, after an hour and a half of wondering -- sometimes amusedly, sometimes impatiently -- just what this strenuously unconventional movie is supposed to be, you discover that the answer is as conventional as can be.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The one-liners are clever enough and the physical comedy and pop-culture goofing sufficiently dumb and broad to make Undercover Brother, a reasonably pleasant experience.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    If you're amused by jokes involving male genitals, female pubic hair, flatulence and dismemberment, it should be a big hit.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The story, touching though it is, does not quite have enough emotional resonance or variety of incident to sustain a feature, and even at 85 minutes it feels a bit long. The premise, too, is a little thin.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Like Christopher Walken or Marlon Brando, Mr. Pacino frequently uses his gifts to make mediocre movies more interesting. Everything else in The Recruit may be tiresomely predictable, but he, at least, is not.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Works best as a bang-and- boom action picture, a loud symphony of bombardment and explosion juiced up with frantic editing and shiny computer-generated imagery.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Unfortunately, the rest of the movie does not live up to Mr. Russell's performance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The action and humor are enough to make an hour and a half pass quickly and pleasantly.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The filmmakers try to balance pointed, often incisive satire and unabashed sweetness, with results that are sometimes bracing, sometimes baffling and quite often, and in unexpected ways, touching.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The movie can -- indeed, should -- be intellectually rejected, but you can't quite banish it from your mind.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    In essence, it's a ragged collection of bits and sketches cobbled into about a dozen plots, most of which call upon the cast to do a lot of tongue and neck-spraining French kissing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The movie is so small and emotionally constricted that it gives Hoffman too little room to explore his range.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Has a ghoulish wit. It's not as cheekily knowing as the "Scream" movies or as trashily Grand Guignol as the "Evil Dead" franchise, but like those pictures it recognizes the close relationship between fright and laughter, and dispenses both with a free, unpretentious hand.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    For all the hype and the inevitable box office bonanza, Terminator 3 is essentially a B movie, content to be loud, dumb and obvious.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It does have its tart, fizzy moments.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The movie's comic heart consists of a series of indescribably loopy, elaborately conceived happenings that are at once rigorous and chaotic, idiotic and brilliant.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Both entertaining and empty: an emotional shell game that leaves you feeling cheated even though, on the surface at least, everyone is a winner.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A disjointed, sometimes fascinating mélange of moods, associations and effects.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Lazin succeeds in conjuring his presence and in showing how smart and likable he could be, but the film's perspective is frustratingly limited.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A thin, pleasant teenage heist comedy with a chewy nugget of social criticism buried inside it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Some of the scenes are like mislaid puzzle pieces, and they snap into place only when all three movies have been seen and absorbed. This makes watching any one of the episodes both more interesting and more frustrating than it might otherwise be, since a portion of dramatic satisfaction is always withheld.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Belvaux's sensitive, generous way with actors suggests that, with more discipline and less gimmickry, he might have made a single masterwork, and After the Life provides the best support for this assessment.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Some of the performances show flashes of idiosyncrasy and flair that are nearly snuffed out by the pedestrian script.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    From a technical standpoint, Taking Lives is competent and sometimes even impressive. It is cleanly edited and nicely shot -- at times as cool and rich as a York Peppermint Pattie. Beyond that, there is not much to say.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Unquestionably minor, perhaps deliberately so, but it is nonetheless intermittently delightful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The storytelling is choppy and abrupt, and the filmmakers rely heavily on voice-over narration to announce themes that are never brought to dramatic life on screen. Mr. Ledger, his heartthrob charisma camouflaged behind a heavy beard, gives a stiff, hesitant performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It is not so much a documentary as a fictional film about the making of a documentary, or perhaps a documentary about the making of a fictional film about the making of a documentary. If this sounds a bit maddening, it is, though the confusion that The Blonds induces is clearly part of its intention.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The narrative scheme, the brooding period atmosphere, the understated score (by David Byrne) and the precision of the acting also make the story seem more interesting than it is.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    For what it is -- a big, expensive, occasionally campy action movie full of well-known actors speaking in well-rounded accents -- Troy is not bad. It has the blocky, earnest integrity of a classic comic book, and it labors to respect the strangeness and grandeur of its classical sources.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The performances, even those by trained actors like Mr. Ramirez and Ms. Majorino, have the hesitant, blinking opacity that some directors look for in nonprofessional casts. Their awkwardness is charming, and part of the point of the movie, but it also makes for some dull stretches and thwarts your ability to regard the characters with sympathy rather than mere curiosity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    More amusing than annoying. It is not as maniacally uninhibited as "Old School" or as dementedly lovable as "Elf," but its cheerful dumbness is hard to resist.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Lacks both the intellectual rigor and the soulful sublimity of "A.I.," but it nonetheless allows some genuine ideas and emotions to pop up amid the noise and clutter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The skills on display in Freestyle are too varied and idiosyncratic for one movie to contain, but this one at least offers a heady, rousing education in an art form that is too often misunderstood.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Los Angeles Plays Itself, in spite of its length, is rarely tedious, an achievement it owes mainly to the movies it prodigiously excerpts.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Miike is best known in the United States for horror films like "Audition" and "Ichi the Killer." Gozu, for all its extremity, is a more relaxed, less disturbing picture. Its dreamy disconnection is reminiscent of David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive," but it is, if anything, even more hermetic and dissociated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The sharks are scary, and the ocean is vast and indifferent, but the most effective parts of Open Water, which is ultimately too modest to be very memorable, evoke a deeper terror, one that can chill even those viewers who would never dream of putting on a wet suit and jumping off a boat.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    At a certain point, Mr. Carruth's fondness for complexity and indirection crosses the line between ambiguity and opacity, but I hasten to add that my bafflement is colored by admiration.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    As drama, Stage Beauty is both timorous and ungainly, words that might also describe Ms. Danes's performance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Being Julia may not make much psychological or dramatic sense, but Ms. Bening, pretending to be Julia (who is always pretending to be herself), is sensational.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Unlike most movie love stories, Closer does have the virtue of unpredictability. The problem is that, while parts are provocative and forceful, the film as a whole collapses into a welter of misplaced intensity.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A loose- jointed, not especially memorable comic caper with some lovely moments of humorous invention, many patches of clumsy writing and a few game performances.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Lan Yu is like a less dizzily gorgeous companion to Mr. Wong's "In the Mood for Love" -- very much a Hong Kong movie despite its mainland setting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The picture is saved from mediocrity by Mr. Raimi's smooth competence, and by the unusually high quality of the acting.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Every so often a movie comes along that's bad in such original and unexpected ways that it inspires an almost admiring fascination
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Murphy is not given much to do in this sloppy, good-hearted sequel, so he graciously allows himself to be upstaged by all manner of animatronic, celebrity-voiced talking animals.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Moves nimbly from behind-the-scenes comedy to melodrama, with occasional stumbles into pop psychology and film-noir violence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    This may be the coach's story, but to the extent that Coach Carter is interesting rather than merely inspirational, it's because of the team.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    An average romantic comedy put together with enough professionalism to keep your cynicism momentarily at bay, featuring good-looking actors who also, in this case, seem like pretty nice people.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A slight, amusing documentary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A seriously flawed movie wrapped around two nearly perfect performances.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It is a beautifully made film - decorously composed, meticulously acted, cleanly photographed. But all of these qualities make it seem complacent and hypocritical when it wants to be honest and brave, and sentimental rather than emotionally daring.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Smart, sincere and sloppy film.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Lovely though it is to look at, it does not reveal very much. Sampling the works of three prominent directors in one sitting may be what gives anthology films like this one their appeal, but the experience is often more frustrating than fulfilling.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Superfluous though it may be, The Honeymooners is not so bad.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A sometimes enthralling, sometimes exhausting tour de force.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It's not heaven, exactly, but after the purgatory of the late summer movie season, it may be close enough.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Tight, sober and strangely comical.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Follows a formula, but the formula, when applied with skill and intelligence, as it is here, is pretty much foolproof.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    All of this makes the movie pleasant, but not very memorable - a pale mirror image of "Shopgirl," which touches on some similar themes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Silverman is a skilled performer, and Jesus Is Magic is occasionally very funny, but don't be fooled: naughty as she may seem, she's playing it safe.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The Promise occupies a curious landscape somewhere between opera and cartoon.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Glory Road is satisfying less for its virtuosity than for its sincerity, and also because it will acquaint audiences with a remarkable episode that had ramifications far beyond the basketball court.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Front-loaded with inspired gags, and the first half-hour is both sneakily and explosively funny, raising expectations that are never quite met.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    In general, and in spite of its deft use of archival video clips and interviews, Giuliani Time offers a superficial reading of recent New York history, zeroing in on the headlines while often missing the context.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    While far from a great movie, nonetheless effectively dramatizes a position that has been argued, by principled commentators on the left and the right, for several years now: that the abuse of prisoners, innocent or not, is not only repugnant in its own right.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Narrative coherence is perhaps not among the film's virtues, but its loopy, cluttered story is part of the fun. And a clearer, simpler plot might have required the sacrifice of some delightful grace notes and visual marvels, like the elastic-necked geisha or the one-eyed ambulatory umbrella.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    None of it is quite believable -- the film is too studied, too forward in its conceits to be entirely satisfying -- but Mr. Eckhart and Ms. Bonham Carter approach their roles with intelligence and conviction.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    If I had a child near Dre's age, I'd drag him or her out of "Marmaduke" and into The Karate Kid--but not before requiring an at-home screening of the still unsurpassed original.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    There's no buildup, no narrative arc, just one scene of comically debauched partying after another.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mining the incest prohibition for laughs in what's essentially a light romantic comedy is a bold move, and for the first two-thirds of the movie, it works surprisingly well. But as long as the Duplasses are willing to go there, I can't help but wish they'd gone a little further.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Watching Jackass 3-D was like being plunged into a Hieronymous Bosch painting of hell, yet this very reaction attests to the franchise's primal, diabolical power.

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