For 1,096 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 State Property
Score distribution:
1,096 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    With its careful, unassuming naturalism, its visual thrift and its emotional directness, Million Dollar Baby feels at once contemporary and classical, a work of utter mastery that at the same time has nothing in particular to prove.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The rapport between Ms. Watts and Mr. Serkis is extraordinary, even though it is mediated by fur, latex, optical illusions and complicated effects. Mr. Serkis, who also played Gollum in the "Lord of the Rings" movies, is redefining screen acting for the digital age, while Ms. Watts incarnates the glamour and emotional directness of classical Hollywood.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Like a good novel, Les Destinées is many things: a family chronicle, a series of psychological portraits, a sumptuous re-creation of the past. But the film is also a pointed tribute to the French tradition of quality and distinction, a tradition in which it clearly includes itself.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Like finding that perfect stage of moderate drunkenness in which the senses are sharpened rather than dulled, and time passes with leisurely grace.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Its pleasures are almost obscenely abundant.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Watching E.T now, in an era dominated by cold, loud special-effects-laden extravaganzas, one is struck less by its lavish grandeur than by its intimacy and precision.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Guest and Mr. Levy's jokes are sometimes so subtle as to seem imperceptible, until you realize that they are everywhere, from the broadest gestures to the tiniest details of dress and décor.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Astonishingly well acted film, so much so that it seems unfair to single out any of the performances. Mr. Lawrence's camera sense is as sure and unobtrusive as his feel for acting. The movie just seems to happen, to grow out of the ground like a thorny plant, revealing the intricate intelligence of its design only in hindsight.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Neither the neighborhood intimacy of "Mean Streets" nor the grandeur of the "Godfather" movies is imaginable without Visconti's example. Its richness, though, is inexhaustible, and well served by the spotless new 35-millimeter print being shown at Film Forum.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Full of brilliantly executed coups de théâtre, showing the director's natural flair for spectacle.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    It rediscovers the aching, desiring humanity in a genre -- and a period-- too often subjected to easy parody or ironic appropriation. In a word, it's divine.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Not merely an interesting document from a far-off place; it is a masterpiece.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    To skip Moolaade would be to miss an opportunity to experience the embracing, affirming, world-changing potential of humanist cinema at its finest.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Stupendously entertaining.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    I realize that the fear of contracting writer's block from a fictional character is crazy, but in the brilliantly scrambled, self-consuming world of Adaptation it has a certain plausibility.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    What Mr. Crowe has done is nonetheless remarkable. He has made a movie about sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll that you would be happy to take your mother to see.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Mystic River is the rare American movie that aspires to -- and achieves -- the full weight and darkness of tragedy.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    In exchange for three hours of your time, Yi Yi will give you more life.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Surely the best movie yet made from Mr. Irving's fiction. It may even belong in the rarefied company of movies that are better than the books on which they are based.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    It's surely the best depiction of teenage eccentricity since "Rushmore," and its incisive satire of the boredom and conformity that rule our thrill-seeking, individualistic land, and also its question-mark ending, reminded me of "The Graduate."
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The movie we've been waiting for all year: a comedy that doesn't take cheap shots, a drama that doesn't manipulate, a movie of ideas that doesn't preach. It's a rich, layered, juicy film, with quiet revelations punctuated by big laughs.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Qualifies as one of my favorite movies of all time. This 1932 masterpiece, now digitally restored with retranslated subtitles and a newly recorded score, is a silent film that doesn't feel silent at all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    See it because it's f---ing hilarious.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    If you're interested in the history of the human race-if you're a member of the human race-you owe it to yourself to see this movie.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Asghar Farhadi's A Separation serves as a quiet reminder of how good it's possible for movies to be.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    A clever, vividly imagined, consistently funny, eye-poppingly pretty and oddly profound movie … about Legos.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The World’s End not only makes a more than worthy conclusion to the Cornetto trilogy — it stands on its own as one of the sharpest, saddest and wisest comedies of the year.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The way that Redford’s character — who for all his namelessness and near-wordlessness emerges as a distinct character, a calm, pragmatic, curious man with a dry sense of humor — struggles with that ultimate question is the beating heart of All is Lost, which somewhere in its second hour goes from being a good movie to being a great one.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Fruitvale Station’s wrenching power lies in the specificity of its storytelling and the ordinary human warmth of the world it conjures. You walk out of it, not shaking your head over an abstract social problem, but grieving the senseless death of one flawed, complex, tragically young man.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Boyhood reimagines the coming-of-age film as family album, longitudinal character study, and collaborative artistic experiment — a mad risk that paid off in a movie that’s as transcendent as it is ordinary, just like life.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Turner does resemble "Topsy-Turvy" in its meticulous yet vibrant recreation of the past and its ever-expanding thematic amplitude. This is a movie not only about one particular artist, but about art as both a field of human endeavor and an object of shifting cultural and economic value.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The Babadook creates tension not with jump scares or chase sequences but with judicious editing and slow-burn suspense—that is, until it descends into a final half-hour of harrowing emotional and physical intensity, an extended climax that made me gasp aloud, hide my eyes, and weep at least twice.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Ida
    There’s an urgency to Ida’s simple, elemental story that makes it seem timely, or maybe just timeless.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    As the couple’s widening rift exposes the gender and class assumptions that underlie their marriage... Force Majeure morphs into a biting critique of modern masculinity, of traditional parenting roles, and possibly of the institution of marriage itself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Not for the faint of heart, though it has no scenes of overt violence, and barely a tear is shed. It is also strangely thrilling, not only because of the quiet assurance of Mr. Kore-eda's direction, but also because of his alert, humane sense of sympathy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    A fascinating and fine-grained reconstruction of that period in its subject's life, a time when he (Capote) pursued literary glory and flirted with moral ruin.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    This document of youthful confusion has not aged one minute. If anything, its detached, discursive and sympathetic observation of the earnest foolishness of post-baccalaureate, pre-1968 Parisians is more acute, and more prophetic, than ever.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The Holy Girl may occasionally frustrate your desire for clarity and order, but in the end it will reward your patience, and you leave the theater in a state of quiet awe.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    A gorgeous, heartbreaking and utterly convincing work of art.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    This is by far the best film in the more recent trilogy, and also the best of the four episodes Mr. Lucas has directed. That's right (and my inner 11-year-old shudders as I type this): it's better than "Star Wars."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Sophie, in both her incarnations, joins an impressive sisterhood of Miyazaki heroines, whose version of girl power presents a potent alternative to the mini-machismo that dominates American juvenile entertainment. Not that children are the only viewers likely to be haunted and beguiled by Howl's Moving Castle - all that is needed are open eyes and an open heart.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The film is a triumph of mood and implication.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Like a perfect, short-lived love affair, its pleasure is accompanied by a palpable sting of sorrow. It leaves you wanting more, which I mean entirely as a compliment.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Sauper has produced an extraordinary work of visual journalism, a richly illustrated report on a distant catastrophe that is also one of the central stories of our time.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Alan, who Mr. Sachs has said was based on his own father, is a great character - passionate, complicated, bursting with life. Those words also describe Mr. Torn's performance.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Both sharply comical and piercingly sad. Mr. Baumbach surveys the members of the flawed, collapsing Berkman family with sympathy but without mercy, noting their individual and collective failures and imperfections with relentless precision.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    He [Clooney] has found a cogent subject, an urgent set of ideas and a formally inventive, absolutely convincing way to make them live on screen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The animation is a marvel - all the more so because the most demanding sequences seem almost casually tossed off. The world of Wallace and Gromit is one of the few genuinely eccentric places left in the movies, a place where lumpy, doughy characters achieve a peculiar dignity in spite of their grotesque features and the ridiculousness of their circumstances.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    A tough and touching exploration of honor and friendship among thieves.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The gloom of random, meaningless existence has rarely been so much fun, and Mr. Allen's bite has never been so sharp, or so deep. A movie this good is no laughing matter.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It represents something stranger and, to those of us with only a secondhand or thirdhand knowledge of that history, more disturbing: a survivor's conviction that there were aspects of the experience itself that can only be described as beautiful.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    This is not just a movie-within-a-movie, but a movie-within-a-movie-within-a-movie, something that sounds unbearably arch but that is swift, funny and surprisingly unpretentious.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The Spirit of the Beehive, like "Cinema Paradiso," also takes place at the particular intersection of reality and fantasy defined by youthful moviegoing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It's not a perfect movie, and it does not aspire to be a great one. It's just wonderful.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Like its hero, who is brave without a trace of bravado, Overlord is unusually quiet and thoughtful. The scale and ambition of combat movies has usually been epic, but this one is disarmingly lyrical and subjective.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Stone has taken a public tragedy and turned it into something at once genuinely stirring and terribly sad. His film offers both a harrowing return to a singular, disastrous episode in the recent past and a refuge from the ugly, depressing realities of its aftermath.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Parker has brilliantly updated his source and grasped its essence, composing a sorrowful and hilarious tone poem about alienated labor, or an absurdist workplace sitcom, as if a team of French surrealists had been put in charge of "The Drew Carey Show."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    In an era whose culture was defined by what the literary critic Richard Poirier called the performing self, Mr. Ali's persona was one of the greatest performances of all.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    An unexpected delight, a film that weds the humor and magic of a folk tale with a very modern feel for the psychological dynamics between men and women and for the subtle politics of male rivalry in a macho culture. It has been made and acted with intelligence and evident love, which deserves to be requited.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Moves with fluidity and ease through brisk opening conventions to a perfectly poised and balanced endgame.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    If you have any affection at all for traditional American music, the movie itself -- is pretty close to heaven.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Ozon gives the movie to Ms. Rampling, whose performance is like a perfectly executed piano etude, finding precise, impossibly subtle shadings of pleasure, confusion and distress.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    This movie operates in the limbo between memory and oblivion that we recognize as daily life. It bears courageous and stringent witness to the impossibility of bearing witness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The lovely clarity of this story, which seems to have been drawn from the literature of an earlier age, is well served by the artful subtlety of the telling. Mr. Majidi prefers imagery to exposition, and his shots are as dense with meaning, and as readily accessible, as Dutch paintings.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Is, in the end, a boisterous love song -- a funny valentine to London, to chaos and to human decency.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    A brilliant satire of emotional politics.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The film they have put together is dense with sound and information, but it moves with a swift, lilting rhythm that is of a piece with the musical heritage it explores.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    One of the great movies of the 1960's, but it has been, in this country at least, maddeningly elusive. In spite of its bitter edge, Billy Liar is pure Ambrosia.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It's not one of Kurosawa's great films.... But it is, within its own proportions, nearly perfect.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Metropolis retains its power to overwhelm, trouble and move because it is connected to the deep anxieties of modern life as if by a high-voltage cable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The director manages to evade both the stuffy antiquarianism and the pandering anachronism that subvert so many cinematic attempts at historical inquiry.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Documenting war is a small, partial but indispensable step toward its eventual eradication. Mr. Frei's quiet, engrossing film is a sad and stirring testimony to this vision and to the quiet, self-effacing heroism with which Mr. Nachtwey has pursued it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    She (Varda) plucks images and stories from the world around her, finding beauty and nourishment in lives and activities the world prefers to ignore.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The political implications of the film are manifest, as is the quiet courage of making it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Every shot seems measured for maximum effect, and when the pace suddenly quickens in a late action sequence on a deserted subway train, it results in a moment of pure Hitchcockian panic that reverberates like thunder in the fretful, melancholy air.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    You come away from his film overwhelmed, hopeful and, perhaps paradoxically, illuminated.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    A refreshing movie that's so good natured, so confident of its ability to provoke not queasy awe or numb exhaustion but pure delight.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    There is nothing quite like this movie, and I'm not altogether sure there is much more to it than its lovely peculiarity. But at a moment when so many films strive to be obvious and interchangeable as possible, it is gratifying to find one that is puzzling, subtle and handmade.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Like the great films of the 1930's and early 40's, it is at once artful and unpretentious, sophisticated and completely accessible, sure of its own authority and generous toward characters and audience alike -- a movie whose intended public is the human race.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Heist is a pleasure to watch, and the greatest pleasure is to watch Mr. Lindo and Mr. Hackman steal it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The Coens have used the noir idiom to fashion a haunting, beautifully made movie that refers to nothing outside itself and that disperses like a vapor as soon as it's over.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Thrillingly smart, but not, like so many other pictures in this vein, merely an elaborate excuse for its own cleverness. As you puzzle over the intricacies of its shape, which reveal themselves only in retrospect, you may also find yourself surprised by the depth of its insights.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It's amazing to see a film so brazenly experimental, so committed to reflecting on the circumstances and techniques of its making, that is at the same time so intent upon delivering old-fashioned cinematic pleasures like humor and pathos, character and plot.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    By allowing the stories to play off one another and allowing layers of meaning to accumulate before we even notice them, the filmmakers capture some of the essential strangeness of life -- the way our relations are governed by laws that remain invisible to us until art reveals their workings.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    To call The Son a masterpiece would be to insult its modesty. Like the homely, useful boxes Olivier teaches his prodigals to build, it is sturdy, durable and, in its downcast, unobtrusive way, miraculous.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Osama's unvarnished vulnerability, along with the director's combination of tough-mindedness and lyricism, prevents the movie from becoming at all sentimental; instead, it is beautiful, thoughtful and almost unbearably sad.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    An astute and surprisingly gripping drama not only about the ethics of magazine writing, but also, more generally, about the subtle political and psychological dynamics of modern office culture.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It seems almost unthinkable that such a charismatic, generous and lively man could be gone. It also makes you understand what it means for a country like Haiti to lose a citizen like Jean Dominique.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    In spite of its limited perspective on Vietnam, its churning, term-paperish exploration of Conrad and the near incoherence of its ending, (it) is a great movie. It grows richer and stranger with each viewing, and the restoration of scenes left in the cutting room two decades ago has only added to its sublimity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Enough drama, humor and unfiltered nail-biting suspense to put all the thrill-mongering screenwriters in Hollywood to shame.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Its effects seem more like those of a poem or a piece of music than a movie. Requires the reverent darkness and communal solitude of a theater.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Offers the kind of experience that makes you glad movies exist.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    An almost unbearably powerful documentary.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Has a quiet, cumulative magic, whose source is hard to identify. Its simple, meticulously composed frames are full of mystery and feeling; it's an action movie that stands perfectly still.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Like so many European pictures these days, Read My Lips seems destined to be remade in Hollywood, and it is unlikely to be improved by the addition of vainer actors, a simpler screenplay and flashier direction.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    All the drinking, arguing and brooding, which in lesser hands might have produced oppressive and unvarying dreariness, somehow adds up to a tableau of extraordinary vividness and variety.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It is, all in all, a rambunctious and inspired ride in which the Coen brothers' voracious fascination with the arcana of American popular culture and their whiz-kid inventiveness reach new heights of whimsy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Remarkable for its genuine, unpretentious lyricism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    You realize you are witnessing a psychodrama of novelistic intricacy and epic scope.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Ten
    A work of inspired simplicity.

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