For 1,065 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Last Orders
Lowest review score: 0 Salinger
Score distribution:
1,065 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    With its careful, unassuming naturalism, its visual thrift and its emotional directness, Million Dollar Baby feels at once contemporary and classical, a work of utter mastery that at the same time has nothing in particular to prove.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The rapport between Ms. Watts and Mr. Serkis is extraordinary, even though it is mediated by fur, latex, optical illusions and complicated effects. Mr. Serkis, who also played Gollum in the "Lord of the Rings" movies, is redefining screen acting for the digital age, while Ms. Watts incarnates the glamour and emotional directness of classical Hollywood.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Like a good novel, Les Destinées is many things: a family chronicle, a series of psychological portraits, a sumptuous re-creation of the past. But the film is also a pointed tribute to the French tradition of quality and distinction, a tradition in which it clearly includes itself.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Like finding that perfect stage of moderate drunkenness in which the senses are sharpened rather than dulled, and time passes with leisurely grace.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Its pleasures are almost obscenely abundant.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Watching E.T now, in an era dominated by cold, loud special-effects-laden extravaganzas, one is struck less by its lavish grandeur than by its intimacy and precision.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Guest and Mr. Levy's jokes are sometimes so subtle as to seem imperceptible, until you realize that they are everywhere, from the broadest gestures to the tiniest details of dress and décor.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Astonishingly well acted film, so much so that it seems unfair to single out any of the performances. Mr. Lawrence's camera sense is as sure and unobtrusive as his feel for acting. The movie just seems to happen, to grow out of the ground like a thorny plant, revealing the intricate intelligence of its design only in hindsight.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Neither the neighborhood intimacy of "Mean Streets" nor the grandeur of the "Godfather" movies is imaginable without Visconti's example. Its richness, though, is inexhaustible, and well served by the spotless new 35-millimeter print being shown at Film Forum.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Full of brilliantly executed coups de théâtre, showing the director's natural flair for spectacle.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    It rediscovers the aching, desiring humanity in a genre -- and a period-- too often subjected to easy parody or ironic appropriation. In a word, it's divine.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Not merely an interesting document from a far-off place; it is a masterpiece.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    To skip Moolaade would be to miss an opportunity to experience the embracing, affirming, world-changing potential of humanist cinema at its finest.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Stupendously entertaining.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    I realize that the fear of contracting writer's block from a fictional character is crazy, but in the brilliantly scrambled, self-consuming world of Adaptation it has a certain plausibility.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    What Mr. Crowe has done is nonetheless remarkable. He has made a movie about sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll that you would be happy to take your mother to see.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Mystic River is the rare American movie that aspires to -- and achieves -- the full weight and darkness of tragedy.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    In exchange for three hours of your time, Yi Yi will give you more life.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Surely the best movie yet made from Mr. Irving's fiction. It may even belong in the rarefied company of movies that are better than the books on which they are based.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    It's surely the best depiction of teenage eccentricity since "Rushmore," and its incisive satire of the boredom and conformity that rule our thrill-seeking, individualistic land, and also its question-mark ending, reminded me of "The Graduate."
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The movie we've been waiting for all year: a comedy that doesn't take cheap shots, a drama that doesn't manipulate, a movie of ideas that doesn't preach. It's a rich, layered, juicy film, with quiet revelations punctuated by big laughs.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Qualifies as one of my favorite movies of all time. This 1932 masterpiece, now digitally restored with retranslated subtitles and a newly recorded score, is a silent film that doesn't feel silent at all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    See it because it's f---ing hilarious.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    If you're interested in the history of the human race-if you're a member of the human race-you owe it to yourself to see this movie.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Asghar Farhadi's A Separation serves as a quiet reminder of how good it's possible for movies to be.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The World’s End not only makes a more than worthy conclusion to the Cornetto trilogy — it stands on its own as one of the sharpest, saddest and wisest comedies of the year.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The way that Redford’s character — who for all his namelessness and near-wordlessness emerges as a distinct character, a calm, pragmatic, curious man with a dry sense of humor — struggles with that ultimate question is the beating heart of All is Lost, which somewhere in its second hour goes from being a good movie to being a great one.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Fruitvale Station’s wrenching power lies in the specificity of its storytelling and the ordinary human warmth of the world it conjures. You walk out of it, not shaking your head over an abstract social problem, but grieving the senseless death of one flawed, complex, tragically young man.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Boyhood reimagines the coming-of-age film as family album, longitudinal character study, and collaborative artistic experiment — a mad risk that paid off in a movie that’s as transcendent as it is ordinary, just like life.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Not for the faint of heart, though it has no scenes of overt violence, and barely a tear is shed. It is also strangely thrilling, not only because of the quiet assurance of Mr. Kore-eda's direction, but also because of his alert, humane sense of sympathy.