For 777 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Almost Famous
Lowest review score: 0 State Property
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 99 out of 777
777 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Waugh's dialogue, effortlessly catching the lockjaw intonations and facetious mannerisms of the British aristocracy between the world wars, is a gift to screenwriters and performers alike. The actors Mr. Fry has assembled receive the gift with gusto and grace.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The nearly flawless execution of a deeply flawed premise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Leaves you with a sense of quiet, chastened grace.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like the best war movies -- and like martial literature going back to the Iliad -- it balances the dreadful, unassuageable cruelty of warfare and the valor and decency of those who fight.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The passions of "Plata Quemada" are as bold as the images.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like a dream within a dream. Its images and emotions are vivid, disquieting and also hermetic, and while it may frustrate your desire for clear storytelling and psychological transparency, it has an intensity that surpasses understanding.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The Bourne Identity, like its hero, triumphs through sheer unreflective professionalism. It is, by today's standards, a modest thriller, with a self-contained storyline and with very few big special effects.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The Dreamers, which is disarmingly sweet and completely enchanting, fuses sexual discovery with political tumult by means of a heady, heedless romanticism that nearly obscures the film's patient, skeptical intelligence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    By making the camera an observer, we get a perspective that often comes out of horror movies, a choice that whips the ordinary with the terrifying, an unforgettable mix.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Corneau, an eclectic director with a mildly perverse sensibility, turns the conflict of cultures into a psychodrama that is at once lighthearted and intense.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Nobody else working in movies today can make her (Keaton) own misery such a source of delight or make the spectacle of utter embarrassment look like a higher form of dignity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The rapprochement between Rémy and Sébastien is beautiful to watch, and all of the characters in The Barbarian Invasions are played with a lusty warmth that makes them lovable even when they are being tiresome.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    For all its echoes of Frank Capra and Charlie Chaplin (as well as Ford), the movie is also a love letter to modern Tokyo, whose alleyways and skyscrapers are drafted with flawless precision and tinted with tenderness and warmth.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Lou synthesizes a wide range of styles and influences - from "Casablanca" to Wong Kar-wai - resulting in a movie that, for all its haunting strangeness, seems curiously familiar.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A freshness and intensity that recall the television series "My So-Called Life."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A wise, gentle and sad new comedy by Zhang Yimou.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The movie belongs to Ms. Rodriguez. With her slightly crooked nose and her glum, sensual mouth, she looks a little like Marlon Brando in his smoldering prime, and she has some of his slow, intense physicality. She doesn't so much transcend gender as redefine it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    At once wildly metaphorical and distressingly literal-minded, Shadow of the Vampire tries, with mixed success, to be scary, funny and profound all at once.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like most great musicals, though, this one slides, with breathtaking ease, from silliness to pathos and freely mixes exquisiteness and absurdity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Without Ms. Kidman's brilliantly nuanced performance, Birth might feel arch, chilly and a little sadistic, but she gives herself so completely to the role that the film becomes both spellbinding and heartbreaking, a delicate chamber piece with the large, troubled heart of an opera.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The resulting film is moving, charming and sad, a tribute to Ms. Briski's indomitability and to the irrepressible creative spirits of the children themselves.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Outrageous fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    At once somber and mysterious, comical and sad. It shows just how lonely a crowded city can be.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The Big Red One, for all its uncompromising brutality, is viscerally, angrily alive. Fuller was lucky to survive the war. It is our good fortune that this film, a tribute to his luck (and to those who did not share it), has come back to life.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Whatever your opinions about the war, the conduct of the journalists who covered it and the role of Al Jazeera in that coverage, you are likely to emerge from Control Room touched, exhilarated and a little off-balance, with your certainties scrambled and your assumptions shaken.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like many musicals, The Blind Swordsman works better in individual scenes than as a whole. Mr. Kitano is not the most disciplined storyteller, and the plot meanders along tangents and stumbles into flashbacks, losing momentum for long stretches in the middle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Compassionate though it is, this is not a movie that offers much in the way of solace. It insists that there is no end to human weakness, and not much cure for it either. That's pretty strong stuff.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The result is a mountain of honest, nourishing corn, a lavish evocation of simplicity that, for all its showy sophistication, has an appealing emotional directness. For all its sweep and scope and movie-star magic, Cold Mountain is studded with fine small moments and deft supporting performances.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Boyle has hardly lost his sly, provocative perversity or his ear for the rhythms of unchecked violence, but he does seem to be maturing. It's as if, in contemplating the annihilation of the human race, he has discovered his inner humanist.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The script of Before Sunset is both rambling and self-conscious, and at times it has the self-important sound of clever writing. But though it is sometimes maddening, the movie's prodigious verbiage is also enthralling.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Because it is so visually splendid and ethically serious, the movie raises hopes it cannot quite satisfy. It comes tantalizingly close to greatness, but seems content, in the end, to fight mediocrity to a draw.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Clever comedians that they are, they have also rigged Team America with an ingenious anti-critic device, which I find myself unable to defuse. Much as it may pretend otherwise, the movie has an argument, but if you try to argue back, the joke's on you.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like its humor, the film's sentiment sneaks up on you, and so does the dramatic reversal that makes it something more than a collection of wry anecdotes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This film may disappoint some dogmatic Old Hogwartsians: a few plot points have been sacrificed, and Mr. Cuarón does not seem to care much for Quidditch. But it more than compensates for these lapses with its emotional force and visual panache.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Hogan understands both themes, and his filmmaking style is a perfect mixture of wide-eyed wonder and slightly melancholy sophistication.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Spider-Man, while hardly immune to these vices, is, like Mr. Maguire, disarmingly likable, and touching in unexpected ways.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The movie itself triumphs by similar means; it is a marvel of unleashed childishness, like a birthday party on the edge of spinning out of control.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The actor's (Murray) quiet, downcast presence modulates the antic busyness that encircles him, and his performance is a triumph of comic minimalism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    An investigation, at once lucid and enigmatic, of exile, loneliness and the fragile possibility of friendship.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The feelings that this simple, deeply intelligent movie produces -- of horror, admiration, hope and grief -- are as hard to name as they are to dispel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    "For my vision of the cinema," Orson Welles once said, "editing is not simply one aspect. It is the aspect." According to Edge Codes.com, a wonderfully informative new documentary, what was true for Welles's cinema is true for the medium as a whole.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    At first House of Sand may seem like a stark tale of survival, but a surprisingly lush and colorful romance blossoms in its bleak and gorgeous desert setting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Given the event's size and complexity, it is perhaps inevitable that this documentary feels haphazard and superficial, more tourist's photo album than analysis. Still, the glimpses it offers are never less than fascinating.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Both sweet and stringent, attuned to the wonders of childhood as well as its cruelty and terror.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It is fascinating without being especially illuminating, and it holds your attention for its very long running time without delivering much dramatic or emotional satisfaction in the end.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    As he (Allen) interweaves two versions of the Melinda story, one meant to be bathed in pathos, the other sprinkled with whimsy, it becomes apparent that his notions of comedy and tragedy do not quite correspond either to scholarly dogma or to everyday usage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Omarova has a painter's eye for composition and a novelist's sense of character.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Beauty Shop extends the popular "Barbershop" franchise to Atlanta and provides a sassy feminine counterpart to its cozy men's-club vibe.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    A tour de force of grime, fluorescence and destinationless velocity, is more concerned with atmosphere than meaning.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    For all its punches, kicks, whacks and thumps, the movie does not have much impact, and for all its affectionate nostalgia, it produces a strange kind of amnesia. It knocks the sense right out of your head, and its own as well.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Agrelo and Ms. Sewell deserve praise for discovering and illuminating this delightful corner of an educational system that is often portrayed in the grimmest terms, but their execution falls a bit short.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Succeeds in illuminating an almost unimaginably dark story.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Café Lumière stands in relation to "Tokyo Story" as a faint, diminished echo. It is nonetheless a fascinating curiosity, a chance to witness one major filmmaker paying tribute to another in the form of a rigorously minor film.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    This warm, sorrowful film plays like a downbeat variation on an old World War II picture from Hollywood.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Indeed, the movie sometimes has trouble living up to the richness of its subject, or keeping up with the dances' rapid spread and evolution.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Giocante's intoxicating mixture of gamine innocence and womanly knowingness is almost too much for the movie - Lila is surely too much for Chimo - but her charisma, and Mr. Doueiri's insouciant, heart-on-the-sleeve style give it a mood that is at once breathlessly romantic and cannily down to earth.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    More history lesson than dirt-digging expedition, and makes illuminating viewing for anyone curious about how the movies get made - information that is sometimes more interesting than the movies themselves.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Acting is not really the point of this movie, which seems to arise above all from Mr. Spielberg's desire to reaffirm that he is, along with everything else, a master of pure action filmmaking.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It is hard not to admire the independence and ambition of The Beautiful Country, even if the film does fall short of its epic intentions.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Glossy, witty eye candy with some moderately chewy stuff in the middle. This lavish, exhaustingly kinetic film is smarter than you might expect, and at the same time dumber than it could be. It's an impressive product: a triumph of cloning that almost convinces you that it possesses a soul.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Dai Sijie's tender, touching adaptation of his own novel of the same title.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The mixture of old-fashioned themes with newfangled techniques makes The Greatest Game Ever Played a canny piece of feel-good entertainment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Land of Plenty, is like a clumsy, well-meaning intervention in a family quarrel. Mr. Wenders may not have the power to heal the rifts his movie acknowledges - and his account of them may not always be persuasive - but there is nonetheless something touching about his heartfelt concern.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    At times Good Morning, Night feels as claustrophobic as the apartment itself, and you may feel that the director is handling his volatile material with a bit too much delicacy. But the movie's atmosphere is a curious mixture of obliqueness and intensity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Often dramatically jumbled and musically muddled - but every time the film seemed ready to tip into awfulness, the sneer on my lips was trumped by the lump in my throat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Transamerica itself does not always live up to its star, but it is touching and sometimes funny, despite its overall air of indie earnestness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    In any case, what is on screen is a delightful respite from awards-season seriousness - a feather film, you might say, that actually tickles.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The faces of the stars glow with life, which makes you all the more grateful that this, their only film together, has come back.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The film chronicles an astonishing career...Mr. Van Peebles is that rarest of modern creatures: a free man.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    This absorbing documentary, the first directed by Sydney Pollack, is a modest undertaking, offering glimpses of the architect and his work rather than a full-scale portrait or catalogue raisonné.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    As unsettling as it can be, it is also intellectually exhilarating, and, like any good piece of pedagogy, whets the appetite for further study.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Whatever your opinion of the war - and however it has changed over the years - this movie is sure to challenge your thinking and disturb your composure. It provides no reassurance, no euphemism, no closure. Given the subject and the circumstances, how could it?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    That El Perro is so unassuming is part of what makes its humane, sympathetic story so satisfying.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The movie is, above all, a showcase for its stars, who seem gratifyingly comfortable in their own skin and delighted to be in each other's company again, in another deeply silly, effortlessly entertaining movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Miranda is played by Meryl Streep, an actress who carries nuance in her every pore, and who endows even her lighthearted comic roles with a rich implication of inner life. With her silver hair and pale skin, her whispery diction as perfect as her posture, Ms. Streep's Miranda inspires both terror and a measure of awe.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Devotees of the series, admirers of Ms. Sedaris and fake-news junkies who can never get enough of Mr. Colbert will find reasons to see it and to convince themselves that it is funnier and more satisfying than it really is. Count me in.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Time to Leave subordinates narrative to mood. Since the end of the story is never in doubt, the only surprises lie in the particulars of Romain’s behavior and the nuances of sorrow, determination and doubt that pass over Mr. Poupaud’s face.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    What makes Clerks II both winning and (somewhat unexpectedly) moving is its fidelity to the original "Clerks" ethic of hanging out, talking trash and refusing all worldly ambition.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    As a cultural artifact, Talladega Nights is both completely phony and, therefore, utterly authentic. Or, to put it differently: this movie is the real thing. It's finger lickin' good. It's eatin' good in the neighborhood. It's the King of Beers. It's Wonder Bread.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    A modest film, less interested in advocacy or analysis than in sympathy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Frank, sympathetic approach to the awkward age.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Perhaps the most satisfying Bond movie since "The Spy Who Loved Me."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It might be tempting to regard Mr. Andrew and his collaborators as oddballs, but Mr. Earnhart's quizzical, charming movie allows us to see them, finally, as artists.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Though a dramatic (even melodramatic) narrative eventually takes shape, what you remember is the succession of moods and observations through which it emerges.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The inhospitability of the land emphasizes the spare precision of the narratives and helps to give them an atavistic power, as if they were tales that had been handed down since the beginning of time.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The movie, for all its prettiness, manages to be shallow and portentous at the same time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Im's own aesthetic command is evident in the movie's wealth of beautiful, perfectly framed images of nature -- shots so full of passion and perception that they could almost be paintings themselves.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Walks the delicate boundary between politically inflected realism and costumed sentimentality.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Longley makes powerful use of the techniques of cinéma vérité. The absence of voice-over narration and talking-head interviews gives his portrait of daily life under duress a riveting immediacy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    A modest, restrained picture, as small and satisfying as one of Woody Allen's better recent efforts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    A modest and thoughtful movie, and if it doesn't quite break new ground in addressing its difficult subject, it at least does not cheapen it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Akin pursues his happy, silly love story without embarrassment, and In July is ultimately more endearing than irritating.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It could easily have become either prurient or moralistic, but Mr. Goldman's stance is that of a sympathetic observer, and his style combines ground-level realism with a touch of Almodóvarian extravagance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Mr. de Broca's film is full of durable cinematic pleasures: a little sex, a lot of sword fighting and a plot that combines heady passion with complicated political intrigue.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Young viewers seduced by the trashy flash of "The Mummy" and "The Mummy Returns" will be able to glimpse a vanished reality richer, stranger and bigger than all of the special effects in Hollywood.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    An intellectually engaging movie. But Mr. Jia's careful objectivity and regard for material detail are not matched by narrative rigor.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It's an anti- romantic comedy that resolves on a minor chord of grief.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The movie is booby-trapped with so many loud gags that some of its sneakier humor is nearly lost in the din.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Though Last Resort dwells on sorrowful circumstances and illuminates a grim corner of contemporary reality, it is far from depressing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    A breathless dash to nowhere in particular, doesn't feel bad.