For 1,170 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner
Lowest review score: 0 I'm Still Here
Score distribution:
1170 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    As the couple’s widening rift exposes the gender and class assumptions that underlie their marriage... Force Majeure morphs into a biting critique of modern masculinity, of traditional parenting roles, and possibly of the institution of marriage itself.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    A clever, vividly imagined, consistently funny, eye-poppingly pretty and oddly profound movie … about Legos.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Turner does resemble "Topsy-Turvy" in its meticulous yet vibrant recreation of the past and its ever-expanding thematic amplitude. This is a movie not only about one particular artist, but about art as both a field of human endeavor and an object of shifting cultural and economic value.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Only in the medium of animation could a conceit as elaborate as Inside Out’s be dramatized, and only animation this well-designed and executed could bring such a story so vibrantly to life.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    A sneaky slice-of-life indie that comes on all casual and cinéma-verité in the early scenes, then slowly coalesces into a romantic comedy as intricately constructed as any door-slamming stage farce.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The director Todd Haynes and the novelist Patricia Highsmith fit together like a hand and glove - a beautifully manicured hand and a sleek gray-green leather glove, two images that figure prominently in Carol.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    It plays the whole absurd shell game for laughs, even as it acknowledges that the last and bitterest laugh is on the rest of us.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    45 Years is about the relationship of the present to the past and of our past loves to our present lives—a relationship that, like any good marriage, remains a total mystery.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Whatever combination of practical effects and digital wizardry went into the technique that gave rise to Anomalisa’s otherworldly yet very human narrative universe, I hope it will be used to tell more stories, perhaps by this same storyteller.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Moonlight is one of those movies that showers its audience with blessings: raw yet accomplished performances from a uniformly fine cast, casually lyrical camerawork, and a frankly romantic soundtrack that runs the gamut from ’70s Jamaican pop to a Mexican folk song crooned by the Brazilian Caetano Veloso. But the film’s greatest gift may be that flood of cleansing tears—which, by the time this spare but affecting film was over, I was also shedding in copious volume.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Each character in this movie — down to the smallest cameo by Lonergan himself — is an individual rather than a type, prone to spontaneous changes of mood and sometimes amusing outbursts of pettiness or ill humor.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    For all its borrowing and bricolage, La La Land never feels like a backward-looking or unoriginal work. Even when not every one of its risks pays off the way that first song does, this movie is bold, vital, funny, and alive.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Despite its technical and visual grandeur, there’s a moral simplicity to Silence that can sometimes recall the work of perhaps the other greatest deeply Catholic filmmaker, the French master Robert Bresson.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The swift-moving, pulse-pounding Dunkirk reveals its filmmaker at his most nimble, supple, and simple.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The visual beauty of the film, rather than distracting from the troubling story, makes it more troubling still.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    You come away from his film overwhelmed, hopeful and, perhaps paradoxically, illuminated.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Is, in the end, a boisterous love song -- a funny valentine to London, to chaos and to human decency.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The raw intimacy of some of the scenes -- whether they take place at a diner, in the death house or in the bedroom -- is breathtaking.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    An almost unbearably powerful documentary.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Documenting war is a small, partial but indispensable step toward its eventual eradication. Mr. Frei's quiet, engrossing film is a sad and stirring testimony to this vision and to the quiet, self-effacing heroism with which Mr. Nachtwey has pursued it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    A refreshing movie that's so good natured, so confident of its ability to provoke not queasy awe or numb exhaustion but pure delight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Every shot seems measured for maximum effect, and when the pace suddenly quickens in a late action sequence on a deserted subway train, it results in a moment of pure Hitchcockian panic that reverberates like thunder in the fretful, melancholy air.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    She (Varda) plucks images and stories from the world around her, finding beauty and nourishment in lives and activities the world prefers to ignore.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    This movie operates in the limbo between memory and oblivion that we recognize as daily life. It bears courageous and stringent witness to the impossibility of bearing witness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    It's not one of Kurosawa's great films.... But it is, within its own proportions, nearly perfect.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    An unexpected delight, a film that weds the humor and magic of a folk tale with a very modern feel for the psychological dynamics between men and women and for the subtle politics of male rivalry in a macho culture. It has been made and acted with intelligence and evident love, which deserves to be requited.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    If you have any affection at all for traditional American music, the movie itself -- is pretty close to heaven.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    The lovely clarity of this story, which seems to have been drawn from the literature of an earlier age, is well served by the artful subtlety of the telling. Mr. Majidi prefers imagery to exposition, and his shots are as dense with meaning, and as readily accessible, as Dutch paintings.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    Essential viewing for anyone who desires a sense of the finer human grain of a war that now commands the attention of the world as never before.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    One of the great movies of the 1960's, but it has been, in this country at least, maddeningly elusive. In spite of its bitter edge, Billy Liar is pure Ambrosia.

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