For 1,113 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Rocco and His Brothers (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 State Property
Score distribution:
1,113 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Leconte's visual instincts are so impressive that they outstrip his story, leaving us flushed and dazzled, but also, as after a long night of champagne and baccarat (to say nothing of other irresponsible pleasures), hungry, tired, and homesick.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Immerses you in violence and agony, but it may leave you with a curious feeling of detachment.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Even though Love's Labour's Lost is, in showbiz terms, a turkey stuffed with chestnuts, you wouldn't trade it for a pot of gold.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Its subject matter is intrinsically upsetting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It's a bit like "The Sixth Sense," but without the melodramatic comfort of the supernatural.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Kang is a gifted choreographer of bloody chaos, but he has enough range and imagination to strew a few interludes of haunting tenderness amid the shell casings and ketchup packs.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The general talent and dedication of the ensemble mitigate the script's occasional lapses into sentimentality and noisy confrontation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It doles out information so arbitrarily that you are robbed of the twin pleasures of figuring out clues and figuring out you've been fooled.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The main problem with Such a Long Journey is its storytelling. There is simply too much happening.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The brusque realism of Kragh-Jacobsen's style -- his careful suppression of style -- allows a surprising sweetness to emerge.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Somehow, in spite of the stunning vistas and some witty and affecting moments, the story seems to unfold at a distance; the human drama is diminished by the setting rather than amplified by it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Finds a sprawling, vivid middle ground somewhere between documentary and myth.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    There is a lot of violence, but not much action; a plot involving vengeance, jealousy and double-crossing, but not a great deal of suspense.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The film's resolute indifference to fashion makes it, perhaps paradoxically, a refreshing piece of old-style entertainment, accompanied by a whooshing, trembling score by Edward Shearmur.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Though the director's jet-set fantasy world of rugged jewel thieves and sailboat races, triste cabaret singers and sybaritic pleasures may feel dated and more than a little decadent, it is a nice enough place to visit.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Too much seriousness can be fatal to a picture like this one, since it impedes the efficient delivery of dumb laughter and easy thrills.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The movie is a little claustrophobic -- a marathon of conference calls, frenzied pointing and clicking, and office pep talks.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Reasonably well-executed thriller. It suffers not from awkwardness or silliness, which would make it more fun, but rather from its air-brushed, expensive pretentiousness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A hallucinatory tour de force of color, perspective and scale, virtually encapsulates the history of Japanese animation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Except perhaps for Lux, who, like The Virgin Suicides itself, is a hothouse flower perishing for want of sunshine and fresh air.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    By the end, instead of feeling stirred to a high pitch of anxiety and excitement, you may feel battered and worn down. But not, in the end, too terribly disappointed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    By the end, after an hour and a half of wondering -- sometimes amusedly, sometimes impatiently -- just what this strenuously unconventional movie is supposed to be, you discover that the answer is as conventional as can be.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The one-liners are clever enough and the physical comedy and pop-culture goofing sufficiently dumb and broad to make Undercover Brother, a reasonably pleasant experience.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    If you're amused by jokes involving male genitals, female pubic hair, flatulence and dismemberment, it should be a big hit.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The story, touching though it is, does not quite have enough emotional resonance or variety of incident to sustain a feature, and even at 85 minutes it feels a bit long. The premise, too, is a little thin.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Like Christopher Walken or Marlon Brando, Mr. Pacino frequently uses his gifts to make mediocre movies more interesting. Everything else in The Recruit may be tiresomely predictable, but he, at least, is not.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Works best as a bang-and- boom action picture, a loud symphony of bombardment and explosion juiced up with frantic editing and shiny computer-generated imagery.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Unfortunately, the rest of the movie does not live up to Mr. Russell's performance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The action and humor are enough to make an hour and a half pass quickly and pleasantly.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The filmmakers try to balance pointed, often incisive satire and unabashed sweetness, with results that are sometimes bracing, sometimes baffling and quite often, and in unexpected ways, touching.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The movie can -- indeed, should -- be intellectually rejected, but you can't quite banish it from your mind.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    In essence, it's a ragged collection of bits and sketches cobbled into about a dozen plots, most of which call upon the cast to do a lot of tongue and neck-spraining French kissing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The movie is so small and emotionally constricted that it gives Hoffman too little room to explore his range.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Has a ghoulish wit. It's not as cheekily knowing as the "Scream" movies or as trashily Grand Guignol as the "Evil Dead" franchise, but like those pictures it recognizes the close relationship between fright and laughter, and dispenses both with a free, unpretentious hand.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    For all the hype and the inevitable box office bonanza, Terminator 3 is essentially a B movie, content to be loud, dumb and obvious.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It does have its tart, fizzy moments.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The movie's comic heart consists of a series of indescribably loopy, elaborately conceived happenings that are at once rigorous and chaotic, idiotic and brilliant.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Both entertaining and empty: an emotional shell game that leaves you feeling cheated even though, on the surface at least, everyone is a winner.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A disjointed, sometimes fascinating mélange of moods, associations and effects.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Lazin succeeds in conjuring his presence and in showing how smart and likable he could be, but the film's perspective is frustratingly limited.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A thin, pleasant teenage heist comedy with a chewy nugget of social criticism buried inside it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Some of the scenes are like mislaid puzzle pieces, and they snap into place only when all three movies have been seen and absorbed. This makes watching any one of the episodes both more interesting and more frustrating than it might otherwise be, since a portion of dramatic satisfaction is always withheld.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Belvaux's sensitive, generous way with actors suggests that, with more discipline and less gimmickry, he might have made a single masterwork, and After the Life provides the best support for this assessment.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Some of the performances show flashes of idiosyncrasy and flair that are nearly snuffed out by the pedestrian script.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    From a technical standpoint, Taking Lives is competent and sometimes even impressive. It is cleanly edited and nicely shot -- at times as cool and rich as a York Peppermint Pattie. Beyond that, there is not much to say.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Unquestionably minor, perhaps deliberately so, but it is nonetheless intermittently delightful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The storytelling is choppy and abrupt, and the filmmakers rely heavily on voice-over narration to announce themes that are never brought to dramatic life on screen. Mr. Ledger, his heartthrob charisma camouflaged behind a heavy beard, gives a stiff, hesitant performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It is not so much a documentary as a fictional film about the making of a documentary, or perhaps a documentary about the making of a fictional film about the making of a documentary. If this sounds a bit maddening, it is, though the confusion that The Blonds induces is clearly part of its intention.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The narrative scheme, the brooding period atmosphere, the understated score (by David Byrne) and the precision of the acting also make the story seem more interesting than it is.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    For what it is -- a big, expensive, occasionally campy action movie full of well-known actors speaking in well-rounded accents -- Troy is not bad. It has the blocky, earnest integrity of a classic comic book, and it labors to respect the strangeness and grandeur of its classical sources.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The performances, even those by trained actors like Mr. Ramirez and Ms. Majorino, have the hesitant, blinking opacity that some directors look for in nonprofessional casts. Their awkwardness is charming, and part of the point of the movie, but it also makes for some dull stretches and thwarts your ability to regard the characters with sympathy rather than mere curiosity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    More amusing than annoying. It is not as maniacally uninhibited as "Old School" or as dementedly lovable as "Elf," but its cheerful dumbness is hard to resist.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Lacks both the intellectual rigor and the soulful sublimity of "A.I.," but it nonetheless allows some genuine ideas and emotions to pop up amid the noise and clutter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The skills on display in Freestyle are too varied and idiosyncratic for one movie to contain, but this one at least offers a heady, rousing education in an art form that is too often misunderstood.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Los Angeles Plays Itself, in spite of its length, is rarely tedious, an achievement it owes mainly to the movies it prodigiously excerpts.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Miike is best known in the United States for horror films like "Audition" and "Ichi the Killer." Gozu, for all its extremity, is a more relaxed, less disturbing picture. Its dreamy disconnection is reminiscent of David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive," but it is, if anything, even more hermetic and dissociated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The sharks are scary, and the ocean is vast and indifferent, but the most effective parts of Open Water, which is ultimately too modest to be very memorable, evoke a deeper terror, one that can chill even those viewers who would never dream of putting on a wet suit and jumping off a boat.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    At a certain point, Mr. Carruth's fondness for complexity and indirection crosses the line between ambiguity and opacity, but I hasten to add that my bafflement is colored by admiration.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    As drama, Stage Beauty is both timorous and ungainly, words that might also describe Ms. Danes's performance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Being Julia may not make much psychological or dramatic sense, but Ms. Bening, pretending to be Julia (who is always pretending to be herself), is sensational.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Unlike most movie love stories, Closer does have the virtue of unpredictability. The problem is that, while parts are provocative and forceful, the film as a whole collapses into a welter of misplaced intensity.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A loose- jointed, not especially memorable comic caper with some lovely moments of humorous invention, many patches of clumsy writing and a few game performances.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Lan Yu is like a less dizzily gorgeous companion to Mr. Wong's "In the Mood for Love" -- very much a Hong Kong movie despite its mainland setting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The picture is saved from mediocrity by Mr. Raimi's smooth competence, and by the unusually high quality of the acting.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Every so often a movie comes along that's bad in such original and unexpected ways that it inspires an almost admiring fascination
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Murphy is not given much to do in this sloppy, good-hearted sequel, so he graciously allows himself to be upstaged by all manner of animatronic, celebrity-voiced talking animals.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Moves nimbly from behind-the-scenes comedy to melodrama, with occasional stumbles into pop psychology and film-noir violence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    This may be the coach's story, but to the extent that Coach Carter is interesting rather than merely inspirational, it's because of the team.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    An average romantic comedy put together with enough professionalism to keep your cynicism momentarily at bay, featuring good-looking actors who also, in this case, seem like pretty nice people.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A slight, amusing documentary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A seriously flawed movie wrapped around two nearly perfect performances.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It is a beautifully made film - decorously composed, meticulously acted, cleanly photographed. But all of these qualities make it seem complacent and hypocritical when it wants to be honest and brave, and sentimental rather than emotionally daring.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Smart, sincere and sloppy film.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Lovely though it is to look at, it does not reveal very much. Sampling the works of three prominent directors in one sitting may be what gives anthology films like this one their appeal, but the experience is often more frustrating than fulfilling.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Superfluous though it may be, The Honeymooners is not so bad.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A sometimes enthralling, sometimes exhausting tour de force.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    It's not heaven, exactly, but after the purgatory of the late summer movie season, it may be close enough.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Tight, sober and strangely comical.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Follows a formula, but the formula, when applied with skill and intelligence, as it is here, is pretty much foolproof.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    All of this makes the movie pleasant, but not very memorable - a pale mirror image of "Shopgirl," which touches on some similar themes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Silverman is a skilled performer, and Jesus Is Magic is occasionally very funny, but don't be fooled: naughty as she may seem, she's playing it safe.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The Promise occupies a curious landscape somewhere between opera and cartoon.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Glory Road is satisfying less for its virtuosity than for its sincerity, and also because it will acquaint audiences with a remarkable episode that had ramifications far beyond the basketball court.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Front-loaded with inspired gags, and the first half-hour is both sneakily and explosively funny, raising expectations that are never quite met.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    In general, and in spite of its deft use of archival video clips and interviews, Giuliani Time offers a superficial reading of recent New York history, zeroing in on the headlines while often missing the context.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    While far from a great movie, nonetheless effectively dramatizes a position that has been argued, by principled commentators on the left and the right, for several years now: that the abuse of prisoners, innocent or not, is not only repugnant in its own right.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Narrative coherence is perhaps not among the film's virtues, but its loopy, cluttered story is part of the fun. And a clearer, simpler plot might have required the sacrifice of some delightful grace notes and visual marvels, like the elastic-necked geisha or the one-eyed ambulatory umbrella.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    None of it is quite believable -- the film is too studied, too forward in its conceits to be entirely satisfying -- but Mr. Eckhart and Ms. Bonham Carter approach their roles with intelligence and conviction.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    If I had a child near Dre's age, I'd drag him or her out of "Marmaduke" and into The Karate Kid--but not before requiring an at-home screening of the still unsurpassed original.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    There's no buildup, no narrative arc, just one scene of comically debauched partying after another.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Mining the incest prohibition for laughs in what's essentially a light romantic comedy is a bold move, and for the first two-thirds of the movie, it works surprisingly well. But as long as the Duplasses are willing to go there, I can't help but wish they'd gone a little further.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Watching Jackass 3-D was like being plunged into a Hieronymous Bosch painting of hell, yet this very reaction attests to the franchise's primal, diabolical power.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Though I found Hereafter meandering and occasionally sentimental, I couldn't help but admire Clint Eastwood's ambition in taking on-headfirst-the greatest fact of human existence.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Even knowing what's likely to come-the doors opening on their own, the skeptical characters scoffing at metaphysical explanations, the unheeded warnings from paranormally gifted guests-doesn't make it any less nailbiting to watch.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Careening from bathos to bromance to naked sexytime, the movie is like a mashup of three or four different movies, at least two of them fairly unpleasant. And yet Love and Other Drugs is so sincere and unjaded about its mystifying purpose that it keeps our gaze fixed on the screen for the full two hours.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Brooks has given us the rare contemporary rom-com that's by turns (if intermittently) thoughtful and funny, and that doesn't feel focus-grouped, cynical, misogynist, or mean. It seems ungenerous not to cut such a generous movie a break.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    If only the results weren't so respectably dull.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    That minute and a half of still photos packs in more dense, economical laughs than all the laborious gross-outs and chase sequences that came before. Maybe The Hangover Part III should consider restricting itself to the slide-show format.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Super 8 is at its best when it dwells in this secret childhood empire, and at its worst when it juices up its essentially simple story with increasingly senseless action set pieces.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Scene by scene, 50/50 can be both amusing and moving, with the tightly wound Gordon-Levitt and the boundaryless Rogen forming an oddly complementary pair. But as a whole the movie never quite coheres, seeming to skitter away at the last minute from both full-body laughter and full-body sobs.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Even in the film's weaker stretches, the fierce presence of Tilda Swinton made it impossible to tear my eyes away.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The kind of middling-but-watchable heist thriller that, days after seeing it, already feels like something you caught half of on a plane two years ago.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Wanderlust is about two or three script passes away from being a consistently funny, dramatically coherent romantic comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    I was onboard with the gentle charm of Safety Not Guaranteed until these last few scenes, when the genuine trauma suffered by these characters - especially Kenneth, whose paranoia and isolationism seem like symptoms of real mental illness - gets glossed over in an unconvincingly Spielbergian happy ending.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Once you accept the utter and profound inconsequentiality of Rock of Ages, there's much to enjoy in it, from Zeta-Jones' capable hoofing (as a dramatic actress I find her deadeningly dull, but the woman can dance) to Giamatti's sly performance as a calculating, gray-ponytailed rock impresario.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The result feels like a sketchbook, both in a good and bad sense; it's alive and spontaneous and surprising in some parts, underdeveloped and shapeless in others.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Where the book is sinuous and oblique, their film is galumphing and heavy-handed, its rare flights of lyricism stranded between long stretches of outright risibility. And yet there's something commendable about the directors' commitment to their grandiose act of folly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Skyfall leaves you wondering whether this incarnation of the character has anywhere left to go. It's the portrait of a spy at the end of his rope by an actor who seems close to his.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    By the time the great vampire showdown finally got started, I was good and done with Breaking Dawn, Part 2. But the big action scene is so campily over the top - with one twist so unforeseeable - that it sent me out on a burst of grudging goodwill.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    I found myself curiously willing to overlook Admission’s weaknesses, or even to reinterpret them as strengths — couldn’t those inconclusive endings be seen as a refreshingly un-rom-com-like embrace of life’s open-endedness and complexity?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Even as the story accrues preposterousness, the action moves along crisply, and Tatum and Foxx hit a nice buddy-movie vibe.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Nevertheless, I’m So Excited (in Spanish, the title is Los amantes pasajeros, meaning both “the fleeting lovers” and “the passenger lovers”) looks fabulous, talks dirty, and sometimes makes you laugh, which is really all you can ask of a fleeting lover.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    This rough-edged parody feels both distinctive and handmade, and for those reasons alone it’s a hard movie to hate, even when it temporarily loses its comic footing. Anyway, as romantic comedies down the ages have taught us, hatred is just a latent form of love.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Though at times Rosewater is clearly the work of a first-timer still finding his voice, Stewart is indisputably a real filmmaker.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Especially when Baymax is onscreen doing his adorable-puffy-robot thing, Big Hero 6 qualifies as a better-than-average kids’ movie with enough cross-generational appeal to make it a fine choice for a family weekend matinee. But I couldn’t shake the feeling that this film was designed to function as a starter kit for future Marvel aficionados.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    A most curious movie, one with nearly all the elements of a classic crime-family saga and yet somehow lacking the moral complexity and emotional heft of the films to which it pays fastidious aesthetic homage: the New York–set urban thrillers of Sidney Lumet (Serpico, Prince of the City) and Coppola’s Godfather series.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    When every character is always operating at maximum loathsomeness, it can be difficult to recalibrate your disgust-o-meter. I suspect this sense of moral vertigo, and the resulting nausea, is part of what Cronenberg is after, but his skill at evoking those states in the viewer doesn’t make the experience of watching Maps to the Stars any less sour.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Age of Ultron, then, shows what happens when an unstoppable force (Joss Whedon’s imagination) meets an immovable object (the Disney/Marvel behemoth). And the result is, indeed, paradoxical: a crashy, overlong, FX-driven blockbuster that’s capable of morphing, Hulk-to-Banner style, into a loose-limbed ensemble comedy about collaboration, flirtation, and friendship.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    The screenplay doesn't lack for memorable zingers, and thanks to Cody's script and Streep's performance, Ricki emerges as a complex, self-contradictory person (even if most of the supporting characters don't).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Surprisingly enough, it often soars to heights of not bad.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Beneath its stylistic and structural quirks, Big Bad Love -- is a self-indulgent celebration of self-indulgence.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Nothing is particularly believable here, but there are still a few moments of silly, sinister fun.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    There is a real subject here, and it is handled with intelligence and care.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Should have been more polished, and less tame.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Triumph of Love, Marivaux's 270-year-old romantic comedy, is a beguiling trifle, a gauzy, teasing inquiry into the fungibility of emotions.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The surface is rough and profane enough, and the acting sufficiently restrained, to cover the sentimental story with a varnish of gritty realism. But stylish bravado and bad-boy performances don't make the film any less predictable.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Feels more like a thought experiment than a fully developed story.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Depp's witty, spare performance gives the picture a poignancy -- a depth of feeling, if you'll allow the pun -- that Mr. Demme's hectic direction and the hurried script by David McKenna and Nick Cassavetes don't quite earn.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    For his part. Mr. Freeman shows himself, once again, incapable of giving a bad performance.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The most pleasing paradox in Storytelling -- a determinedly paradoxical and, in spite of much of what I've said here, a genuinely pleasing movie -- is that it sets out to debunk this notion and ends up affirming it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Might have been richer and more observant if it were less densely plotted. The characters would resonate more if there were fewer of them, and if they were not pushed through so many contrived dramatic incidents.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    An adequate piece of children's entertainment, though it seems better suited for home viewing...than for the big screen.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Has occasional moments of heat, but not much warmth. And while it is pretty enough to look at, real beauty eludes it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    There's a little more sex than you'll see on WB, but mostly there's an atmosphere of brooding psychodrama and erotic cruelty that falls somewhere between "Cries and Whispers" and "Say Anything."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Unfortunately, The Invisible Circus, which follows Phoebe as she retraces her dead sibling's steps from Paris to Berlin to the coast of Portugal, doesn't so much illuminate Phoebe's confusion as share it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Unabashed, and often quite diverting, technological overkill.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It reminds us that Italy is beautiful, that Fascism was a dreadful nuisance and that Sean Penn is a great actor, deserving of better vehicles than this vintage lemon.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Both stupefyingly bad and utterly overpowering; it can elicit, sometimes within a single scene, a gasp of rapture and a spasm of revulsion.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Has the scruffy charm you expect from this kind of picture, and some admirable feminist pluck. But the story is -- forgive me -- a little thin, and the filmmaking clumsy and rushed.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    With its likable blue-collar characters and its unpretentious exuberance, Everybody's Famous is reminiscent of recent British comedies like "Brassed Off" and "The Full Monty."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Like Lou Ye's "Suzhou River," a Hitchcock homage similarly set in Shanghai's demimonde, So Close to Paradise offers an intriguing and sometimes self-canceling mixture of emotion and style.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Clouds is about the dumbest intelligent movie I've ever seen.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The format and the purposeful blandness of the script make Jordan seem remote, more icon than human being.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Works best when it sticks with the gentle humor and pathos of its literary source.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    A thin and unsatisfying concoction that somehow manages to make one of the richest and most durable sources of culture-clash comedy into an occasion for dullness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The actors, too, bring more realism -- more gravity, if you will -- to the film than its wobbly premise deserves.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    His (Culkin's) performance is earnest and brave, but also mannered when it should be un-self-conscious, and awkward when grace is called for.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    If these two can figure out a way to love each other, maybe it isn't necessary for us to like them very much.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The problem lies in the calculating pretentiousness of using human misery to make shallow entertainment seem serious. It's worth comparing Spy Game with "The Tailor of Panama," John Boorman's far superior exercise in post-cold-war spycraft.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Blandly charming.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    (Garvy) has helped advance our understanding of a difficult and exhilarating time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Shyamalan never gives us anything to believe in, other than his own power to solve problems of his own posing, and his command of a narrative logic is as circular -- and as empty -- as those bare patches out in the cornfield.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    If Remember the Titans is corny, it's unabashedly, even generously so.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Carefully sets itself up as an obvious, transparent morality play, and then just as deliberately refuses the easy payoff. This is both impressive and a little disingenuous: the film is in effect congratulating itself for refusing to offer a neat and tidy view of life without offering much else.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Unfortunately, these actors are subject to Mr. LaBute's usual dramatic method, which is to cobble together a preposterous moral outrage and then wave it in front of our faces, asking us to believe that it is a window, or even a mirror.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Stumbles from restrained, fine-edged realism into blunt and muddy melodrama.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It's as if the director, Andrew Fleming, and the screenwriters, Nat Mauldin and Ed Solomon, set out to make a movie that would be mediocre in every respect. If so, they have completely succeeded.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Possession is in the end an honorable, interesting failure. It falls far short of poetry, but it's not bad prose.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The character as written is incoherent, but Ms. Witherspoon has the reflexes to make Elle both appealing and ridiculous. It's funny -- in that slightly queasy, un-P.C. Doris Day kind of way.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It never pretends that it's anything more than trashy, cheesy fun. But even trash -- especially trash this expensive -- should at least be well made. Sure, it's easy on the eyes, but would a little brains be too much to ask?
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The gags and subplots, rather than adding up to sustained hilarity, compete with each other.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Sandwiched between the musical numbers are an eclectic assorment of cameos, including Willie Nelson, Queen Latifa and Elton John. The funniest one comes during the closing credits, when the rapper Xzibit testifies that the Country Bears were a formative influence on hip-hop, certainly something the Eagles could never claim.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    To attempt a culinary metaphor, Ms. van der Oest manages a yolky, runny sitcom omelet rather than the airy soufflé of farce.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Together, Mr. Lee and Mr. Green have a daft comic energy, and they are assisted by game performances from the rest of the cast.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The plot of Antitrust is intricate and uneven, overloaded with twists and not very jolting surprises.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    In the end Amen is neither as moving nor as illuminating as it should be. It suffers especially when compared -- as is inevitable, given the closeness of their release dates -- with "The Pianist," Roman Polanski's movie about a Polish Jew during the Nazi occupation.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The movie itself evolves in reverse, starting life as a moderately clever grab bag of high-concept noodling and half-witty badinage before descending into the primordial ooze of explosions and elaborate lower- intestinal gags.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Beneath the rough vérité exterior beats the same slick, corny heart.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The movie keeps you at a distance; it is visually sweeping, and the history is fascinating, but the drama is rarely stirring.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Sensation, not sense, is the point of this exercise, and what it lacks in originality it makes up for in effective if cheap moments of fright and dread.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The real surprise, given the secondhand material, is that not everything proceeds by rote in Murder by Numbers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Its cheery inoffensiveness, though, is in some ways disappointing.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The best moments come when Mr. Smith and Mr. Lawrence are permitted to pause from their action-hero duties and run their funny, unpredictable mouths.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Polley is a naturally subtle actress, and part of her appeal lies in an unusual ability to seem at once forthright and enigmatic, but this time she comes off as a bit smug.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Lurches when it should glide, shouts when it should whisper and mumbles when it should sing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The most curious thing about this magical-realist fable...is how thin and soft it is, how unpersuasive and ultimately forgettable even its most strenuous inventions turn out to be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    There are some scenes that display impressive technical cunning, and others that show an astute regard for the emotional capacities of his able cast, but On the Run amounts to a sullen display of skill in a dubious cause.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The usual double-crosses and convolutions ensue, but the narrative is so haphazard that the whole thing -- both the caper and the movie that contains it -- seems to have been hastily improvised.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    After a while the movie spins its wheels, unable to find much emotional traction in the icy bleakness.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Polished and bouncy without being overly mawkish or unduly obnoxious. Above all, it is short.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Despite the rococo obsessiveness of its special effects and its voracious sampling of past horror movies, Van Helsing is mostly content to offer warmed-over allusions and secondhand thrills.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    A Slipping-Down Life has a worn, scruffy feeling. It gazes lovingly at vintage clothes and battered old cars as if they were the visible signs of authenticity, wishing that its morose, disconnected inhabitants could somehow be touched with the same elusive quality.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The glacierization of half of the world's inhabited land is contemplated with barely a hint of horror. In fact, it looks kind of cool.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It has a bright young cast and a clever, eclectic soundtrack, but the tone veers unsteadily from mockery to preachiness, and the story loses its breath, hopping from one clumsily paced scene to the next.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Parsons himself might have written a surreal, funny-sad ballad about the aftermath of his own death, but Grand Theft Parsons is little more than a surreal anecdote, told in too much detail and without enough soul or imagination to make anything more than a footnote to a legend.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Luckily there is an element of broad, brawny camp that prevents King Arthur from being a complete drag.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    In parceling his story into discrete scenes, Mr. Cunningham has turned a delicate novel into a bland and clumsy film. A Home at the End of the World, is so thoroughly decent in its intentions and so tactful in its methods that people are likely to persuade themselves that it's better than it is, which is not very good.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The movie's atmosphere is, in many ways, more interesting than its story. Mr. Robbins and Ms. Morton are not the warmest actors. He can be mannered and smug, and she often seems to beam her performances from a strange, private mental universe.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Outfoxed will inevitably be discussed in the same breath (or with the same hyperventilating rage) as Michael Moore's ''Fahrenheit 9/11,'' but it lacks both the showmanship and the scope of that incendiary film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Nobody in it seems organically connected to anybody else. In a movie devoted to the idea that everything and everyone is connected, this is a serious failing, and it undermines Mr. Sayles's noble intentions.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Reasonably good fun, even if, in the end, it's not really very interesting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The result is a minor, meandering film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Inspiring, but also, as a film, a little tedious, without enough narrative or exploration to justify its feature length.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Holds together in spite of its flaws.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    For all the talk of artistic and amorous passion, the film is trapped in snobbish inertia; its idea of period drama amounts to a kind of highbrow name- dropping.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Until its unbearably hokey ending, acquits itself reasonably well.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    While there are some genuinely dazzling moments of visual bravura, the marriage of flatness and depth that Mr. Aramaki attempts doesn't quite work.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    So mild and thin that it doesn't inspire much of a reaction at all. With one exception - a dinner table scene that is by far the most memorable in the movie - the racial humor is studiously unprovocative.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Conventionally described as a political thriller, but The Interpreter is as apolitical as it is unthrilling.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The set design is fairly elaborate by the standards of the genre, and the victims don't die in precisely the order you might expect, but everything else goes pretty much according to formula, including a last-minute plot twist that opens the creaky door to a sequel.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    At best, this film is half-inflated.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    5x2
    Told in the usual sequence, the story of Gilles and Marion would be a banal bell curve of infatuation, bliss, boredom, regret and recrimination. As it is, 5x2 does not quite make the case that Gilles and Marion are entirely worth our interest, let alone our sympathy, but the reversal of narrative order gives their ordinary moments together a faint aura of mystery, as Mr. Ozon teases us with the conceit that it will all make sense in the end - or rather, the beginning.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    This disdain for women is not incidental to the film; it is integral to the fantasy Mr. Brewer is selling, which is that pimping is not as hard as it looks.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    While nothing in the movie - least of all the two main performances - is especially fresh or original, it does have a few decent gags and amusing moments.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    While not especially good - judged strictly on its cinematic merits, it ranges from O.K. to god-awful - it is still a fascinating cultural document in the age of intelligent design.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Taken on its own, without comparison with its literary source, the movie, Mr. Schreiber's first as writer and director, is thin and soft, whimsical when it should be darkly funny and poignant when it should be devastating.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Elizabethtown is a long, lurching trip to nowhere in particular, but Elizabethtown is a place where you wouldn't mind spending some more time, though perhaps under different circumstances.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It's just a movie with no particular reason for existing, a flashy, trifling throwaway whose surface cleverness masks a self-infatuated credulity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Swofford's book has earned a place alongside the classics of military literature, but Mr. Mendes's film is more like a footnote - a minor movie about a minor war, and a film that feels, at the moment, remarkably irrelevant.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The parts of Get Rich or Die Tryin' that feel most genuine have to do with friendship and family, rather than with criminal intrigue. But the movie ultimately lacks an emotional core. It will certainly make 50 Cent even richer, but it wouldn't have killed him to try a bit harder.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    There is no way a feature-length movie could do justice to such bounty, and Walk the Line settles for the minimum.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Entertaining without being especially illuminating. If you must see only one documentary about a Slovene philosopher this year, it might be better to read his books.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    In casting about for new sources of fear, Marebito achieves its own level of mediocrity.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It cheerfully invites the audience to descend to their level, where no joke is too silly or raunchy, and a plot is just a way of passing time between game levels and bong hits.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    I certainly can't support any calls for boycotting or protesting this busy, trivial, inoffensive film. Which is not to say I'm recommending you go see it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Pretty much pure boilerplate: a reasonably well-executed throwaway that, when you finally get around to seeing it in its proper setting, will make you glad you decided to travel by air instead of by sea.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Just My Luck is a bit of lukewarm cappuccino froth confected to float Ms. Lohan to the next stage of her career.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The script (by Jeremy Garelick and Jay Lavender) strains hard after a few easy jokes, and the whole movie feels dull and trivial.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Its fidelity to its characters’ view of the world -- although they are presumably college graduates, they seem never to have read a book or expressed an opinion -- is more a liability than a virtue. The Puffy Chair is as modest as their ambitions and as narrow as their curiosity about the world beyond themselves.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The movie turns out to be a predictable and somewhat sentimental lower-depths love triangle, but Ms. Braga almost makes it work.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Unapologetically a B movie, its narrative premise whittled down to a mean little nub and placed carefully on the borderline between the wildly implausible and the completely absurd.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It is hard to feel much warmth toward people whose most salient feature is their disconnection from reality.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It batters you with novelty and works so hard to top itself that exhaustion sets in long before the second hour is over.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    In the end, though, The Ant Bully is adequate rather than enchanting. Unsure of its ability to charm, it compensates with noise, sentiment and low humor, the usual synthetic stew served to children,
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The film has its creepy, suspenseful moments -- but it shrinks a rich, strange story to the dimensions of an anecdote.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Even his fans may find themselves frustrated, since the film observes Mr. Franken closely without generating much insight into him.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    A good summer movie isn't just an uninterrupted crescendo of cacophony. You need stuff IN BETWEEN the fireballs and the cyborgs.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Ultimately The Switch can't escape the constraints of its own formula.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    There's just not quite enough to the movie: not enough jokes, not enough obstacles, not enough sex.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Though the movie never overcomes the miscasting of its lead couple, The Romantics does show a surprisingly fine authorial touch.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Secretariat is a by-the-numbers sports-hero picture with an inexpressive hero (horses look great in motion, but they can't carry a close-up) and a preordained outcome.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    RED
    Red simultaneously tries too hard and not hard enough.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Portman toils slavishly to realize Aronofsky's mad vision. It isn't her fault that, despite Black Swan's visual splendor and bursts of grand guignol excess, this emotionally inert movie never does grow wings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    I'm not sure it would be possible, or desirable, for a documentary to reveal any more about Stephin Merritt than this one does. But I would have loved to see one that revealed more about his music.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Less a movie than an extended re-enactment from a History Channel documentary, the movie is stagey, preachy, and long on exposition.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    If these developments sound slight and meandering, so is the movie. Everything Must Go has a spacious, under-inhabited feeling.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    These ludicrous but endearing moments of bro-bonding are all that sets this otherwise stock-issue superhero movie apart from its mass-produced brethren.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    A peripatetic comedy about two comedians on a jaunt around the north of England, alternately amuses, bores, and annoys, just like its two hilariously intolerable protagonists.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The film spends too much time wringing its hands over the all-too-evident fact that journalism is in crisis, when it could be documenting that crisis from the inside.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Horrible Bosses doesn't quite qualify as a black comedy. Without the conviction to follow through on its own macabre premise, this underachieving little movie washes out to a muddy grayish-brown.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    This Brighton Rock doesn't live up to the greatness of the novel (or even, really, the very-goodness of the 1947 movie), but it doesn't betray Greene's book either, which may be all a reasonable reader and filmgoer could ask.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Despite across-the-board bravura performances (especially by Philip Seymour Hoffman and Paul Giamatti as dueling campaign managers), The Ides of March somehow remains static and lifeless, like a civics-class diorama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The combined efforts of this fine ensemble cast make Tower Heist go down easier than it otherwise might, but the film's potential as a buddy comedy is sadly wasted.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Whether unintentionally or by design, the movie never really makes a case either for or against the troubled figure at its center.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It's such a disappointment that The Descendants isn't a better movie than it is. In this soap opera disguised as a comedy, Payne, who was always a master at balancing sharp satire with an essential humanism, has traded his tart lemon center for a squishy marshmallow one.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    One seriously sick little blockbuster.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Michael Fassbender's portrayal of Brandon, the rootless Manhattan sex addict in Steve McQueen's Shame, may lay claim to this year's title of most outstanding performance in a mediocre movie.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Stiff, talky, and airless, a textbook example of that not-always-true cliché about the unfilmability of theater.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Fincher is a master of mood and atmosphere, but this chilly, efficient movie never transcends the shallowness of its source material.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Though Carano isn't without a certain glowering charisma, her flat line readings and apparent discomfort with dialogue-heavy exchanges make her seem like a refugee from a different, schlockier movie, the kind of low-budget, straight-to-video MMA rock-'em-sock-'em that might pop up on late-night basic cable and charm you with its rough-hewn amateurism and animal high spirits. As Haywire's long-seeming 92 minutes limped by, I found myself wishing I was watching that movie instead.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Albert Nobbs is the rare double drag king bill you could plausibly take your grandmother to. It's genteel, well-crafted, mostly sexless and frequently dull - a movie that, like its title character, never quite dares to let itself discover what it really wants to be.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    In spite of my general distaste for Friends With Kids, let me cast my vote on the side of those who liked the ending. I wish more of the film had had that scene's fresh mixture of casual banter and breathless intimacy, instead of sounding like half-remembered dialogue from a movie we've all seen too many times before.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Where "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" frolicked on the beach, this amiable but underachieving comedy just sort of blobs on the couch.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Prometheus is more interested in piling on big questions than in answering them. It's deep without being particularly smart, although the dazzling design and special effects keep you from noticing that basic flaw until at least an hour in.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It's hard not to admire Zeitlin's ambitious vision, his do-it-yourself aesthetic, and the commitment of his cast and crew - a kind of utopian collective whose jobs often overlapped, as the local, nonprofessional actors collaborated on set-building and other technical tasks. But that doesn't mean the result of their labor is exactly what you'd call a "good movie."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Looper felt to me like a maddening near-miss: It posits an impossible but fascinating-to-imagine relationship...and then throws away nearly all the dramatic potential that relationship offers. If someone remakes Looper as the movie it could have been in, say, 30 years, will someone from the future please FedEx it back to me?
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The movie's energy peters out in a series of book-club conversations about divine will, the power of storytelling, and the resilience of the human spirit. The ending's pious dullness is enough to make you wish you were back on that lifeboat, where the most pressing questions weren't spiritual but gastronomic: What's on the menu for lunch, and what can I do to make sure it isn't me?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    I wouldn't recommend Hitchcock to cinephiles seeking a bold new take on the master's life or work, but if all you want is to while away the afternoon in the company of some excellent actors in plummy period costume, Gervasi's film is not without its pleasures.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Hyde Park on Hudson has little more on its mind than hot dogs and hand jobs - which, come to think of it, would have made for a much catchier alliterative title.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Django Unchained provoked a lot of contradictory feelings in me, including some that don't usually come in pairs: Hilarity and boredom. Aesthetic delight and physical nausea. Fist-pumping righteousness and vague moral unease.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    We're all familiar with the experience of seeing movies that cram ideas and themes down our throats. Les Misérables may represent the first movie to do so while also cramming us down the throats of its actors.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The movie's curious capacity for self-erasure makes it a tough one to write about; less than 24 hours later, I recall it with all the clarity of something I half-watched on a plane with a hangover in 1996.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Though it's about a pair of lovers whose passion is strong enough to break down the barriers between life and death, this mildly amusing, sort-of-sweet comedy is strangely sexless and passion-free-these bodies, whether human or zombie, feel room-temperature at best.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Many American viewers may take Haneke at his word and walk out midway through this grueling ethics exam of a movie. But much as I may resent the facile polemics of Haneke's shame-the-viewer project, I have to respect the way that he nailed me, trembling, to my seat.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    A day and half after walking out with a sensation, primarily, of physical relief—at two hours and nine minutes, Pain & Gain makes for a long, loud, relentlessly assaultive sit—I find that my thumb is wavering at half-mast. I’m still not sure whether to mildly like or mildly hate this movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Unfortunately, that sharp-eyed domestic comedy is dwarfed by the far less well-written supervillain crime plot that surrounds it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Frances Ha feels like a collaboration between two people in love, and not always in the best way. There are too many scenes in a row that make the same point.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    If this version of Superman is to have a future — as Warner Brothers seems convinced he will, having already green-lit the sequel — I hope Snyder will dial back both the casualty count and the Krypton mythmaking and instead focus on establishing a fictional Earth that’s rich enough to be worth saving.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Jasmine attains the paradoxical state of being fascinatingly tiresome. The same pair of words might be used to describe Blue Jasmine, which, whether you like it or not, surely counts as one of Allen’s more unexpected films of the past decade
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    This thin, floppy comedy never quite became the high-spirited summer sex romp it clearly set out to be. I haven’t quite figured out yet why The To Do List doesn’t work, when so many elements within it seem to.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    For all its tasteful spareness and eerie, diaphanous mood, Blue Caprice feels, in the end, insubstantial. It’s a true-crime story that illustrates little about the crime in question and a character study whose characters, even when haunting, remain stubbornly opaque.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    I can understand wanting to skip Ender’s Game as a matter of moral principle, but you can also feel free to blow it off just because it’s not that good.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    A sluggish romantic drama
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Neither Alex Murphy’s internal moral conflict nor the larger, vaguely satiric portrait of a global culture dependent on high-tech law enforcement seem to be the main point of this Robocop remake, which raises the question of what is meant to be the point.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    There’s something sour and strained about this movie that’s at odds with the usual Muppet ethos of game, let’s-put-on-a-show cheer. Maybe that’s because of the inordinate amount of screen time spent on the rivalry between two villains who are as uninteresting as they are unpleasant.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The most memorable element of The Winter Soldier, besides Redford, is probably Scarlett Johansson, whose dryly funny Natasha at times comes perilously close to being … a well-developed female character?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    For all the film’s best intentions — and a finely tuned performance from the ever-better Woodley — for me The Fault in Our Stars never entirely found its way out of Sparks territory.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    An entertainment choice I wouldn’t recommend, but one you might not regret if you dial your expectations down (or your drug intake up).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Throughout The Imitation Game, there’s a sense the filmmaker is trying to shield viewers from the story’s most difficult parts — whether it’s the horrors of war, the technical complexity of the Enigma code and its solution, or the bleakness of Alan Turing’s final fate. I wish Tyldum had trusted the audience enough to let us in on the worst. It would have made his movie so much better.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    What ultimately brings down The Boxtrolls isn’t the film’s willingness to wade into grimmer, more gruesome waters than your average kids’ animated adventure. It’s the failure to anchor its often misanthropic story in a character or relationship strong enough to offer a glimpse of redemption—a place of respite in an ugly, cheese-obsessed world.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    It boasts (nearly) all the elements of a perfectly fine, even very good, movie, without ever quite becoming a movie at all.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The tedium of Into the Woods’ second half has less to do with the downbeat subject matter than Marshall’s clumsy direction.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    Tomorrowland is a highly original, occasionally even visionary piece of sci-fi filmmaking, but that doesn't necessarily make it a good movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Captures the true spirit of the holiday. It's mildly sentimental, unabashedly consumerist (with anything-but-subliminal advertisements for McDonald's hamburgers and Nestlé candy tucked inside), studiously inoffensive and completely disposable.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    A likable, featherweight romantic comedy that hardly asks to be taken seriously, but its very triviality is, in some ways, quite significant.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It's hard to watch these two actors plow through the nonsense of K- Pax without feeling that a terrific opportunity has been squandered.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    It is also possible that the problem lies not with Mr. Desplechin but with Ms. Phoenix. Her Esther is a fascinating mixture of passivity and ferocity, but it's not clear that she has the range to show both sides of the character.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The mystery of Enigma is how a rich historical subject, combined with so much first-rate talent -- a highly capable (if not always exciting) director, a fine English cast, a script by Tom Stoppard -- could have yielded such a flat, plodding picture.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The movie is full of scattershot gags and indifferent acting, but you get the feeling that it's bad on purpose, which makes it, given the number of teenage movies that are terrible by accident, not bad at all.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Comedy, like marriage, takes more work than this.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Drags and meanders when it wants clarity and clockwork, and bogs down in hazy, vague emotions.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    (Fishburne's) performance here, witty and profane, vulnerable and strutting, nearly holds the movie together.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Aiming for lighthearted, bittersweet charm, But Forever in My Mind slips into predictability and condescension.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The movie is quiet, modest and sympathetic almost to a fault; its scenes of emotional discord, accompanied by a swooning, sniffling score, seem best suited to cable television. It's like a Lifetime movie about men.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    With its studied nonchalance, Loners reaches neither the hilarity of an episode of "Friends" nor the ethnographic stickiness of "The Real World" on MTV.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Dreamy touches can't compensate for the film's main flaw, which is that the relationship between the two main characters never really develops.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    With so much going for it, how could the movie be such a dud?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    What limits The Guys -- what makes it an exercise in art therapy rather than a work of art -- is its decorous refusal to probe deeply into its characters, or to exploit any of the dramatic potential their accidental relationship might contain.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Sloppy when it should be incisive, indulgent when it should be astringent, and ultimately unsure of what it is mocking and in what spirit.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The proliferating subplots require many big emotional confrontations, so the movie seems to reach its climax 20 minutes in, and then every 15 minutes or so thereafter. This is fairly exhausting.

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