For 1,157 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Fruitvale Station
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
1157 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    One thing that Loving gets right in a way that few civil rights dramas do: It insists on racial discrimination as a systemic problem, not merely an interpersonal one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Soul Kitchen is sprawling, undisciplined, raucous, occasionally crass-and so full of life you forgive it everything.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This installment is all about the grown-up kids. The three young leads - especially Emma Watson, who can do more with a still face than any actress her age - are all terrific
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The Dreamers, which is disarmingly sweet and completely enchanting, fuses sexual discovery with political tumult by means of a heady, heedless romanticism that nearly obscures the film's patient, skeptical intelligence.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It is impossible not to marvel at Mr. Suleiman's knack for turning rage and hopelessness into burlesque.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A witty and acute examination of friendship, ambition and betrayal in the Parisian literary world.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like the best war movies -- and like martial literature going back to the Iliad -- it balances the dreadful, unassuageable cruelty of warfare and the valor and decency of those who fight.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Pucci, emerging slowly from behind a stray lock of brown hair, plays Justin's ambiguous transformation with deft understatement. And Mike Mills, who wrote and directed, keeps the film from slipping either into melodrama or facile satire, the two traps into which this genre is most apt to fall.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Ballets Russes does tell a marvelous story of midcentury show business, encompassing both the most exalted expressions of pure art and the sometimes grubby commerce that sustained it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The script of Before Sunset is both rambling and self-conscious, and at times it has the self-important sound of clever writing. But though it is sometimes maddening, the movie's prodigious verbiage is also enthralling.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Revisits the San Francisco of the late 1960's and early 70's, a time and place so encrusted with legend and cliché that you might wonder if there is anything left to say. It turns out there is quite a lot -- which the filmmakers have brought triumphantly to life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Lithgow and Molina play Ben and George with such depth, tenderness, and history that their affection for one another’s bodies (there’s no sex, but loads of snuggling) seems like a natural extension of their pleasure in being together.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The cast, working in conditions that appear to have been only slightly less dire than those portrayed in the film, work together in a grim, convincing improvisatory rhythm.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The first really good spy movie about the impossibility, under present historical circumstances, of making a really good spy movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    And then comes that transcendent last scene, in which the man whose side we’ve barely left during this incredible ordeal is suddenly revealed as the best kind of hero, not super at all but ordinary and vulnerable and human.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A movie I snickered at more than once but never stopped staring at in wonder. This isn’t Nolan’s best film by any stretch, but it abounds in the qualities that are among his strengths.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Spider-Man, while hardly immune to these vices, is, like Mr. Maguire, disarmingly likable, and touching in unexpected ways.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Compliance examines, among other things, how misplaced faith in authority can lead to abuse on a systemic scale. It's a deeply moral movie about the failure of morality, as grueling to watch as it is necessary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The next two hours might not have quite delivered on that initial promise of wonder - we grown-ups, being heavy, are not so easily swept away by visual tricks - except when I looked away from the screen at the faces of breathless and wide-eyed children, my own among them, for whom the whole experience was new, strange, disturbing and delightful.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A teasing, self-conscious and curiously heartfelt demonstration of his (Mr. Kim) mischievous formal ingenuity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Electrifying.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Two very fine actors, Ned Beatty and Liev Schreiber, engaged in an intense contest to see who can give the more understated performance.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    From start to finish, is pretty much a blast.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Anchors its melodramatic formula in tough, heartfelt realism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A freshness and intensity that recall the television series "My So-Called Life."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The resulting film is an unruly, riveting assemblage of anecdotes and impressions. The larger political and military questions about the war in Iraq are kept deliberately in the background, which some viewers may find frustrating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The feelings that this simple, deeply intelligent movie produces -- of horror, admiration, hope and grief -- are as hard to name as they are to dispel.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Perhaps it's all a bit too much, and perhaps it doesn't add up, but the loose ends give the picture a jaunty, improvised feeling that, while it leads to some confusion, is ultimately part of its whimsical charm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The thoughtful and leisurely paced Marley is an exemplary music documentary in almost every way - but the area in which it falls short is an important one. Like a surprisingly large number of films about musicians (whether biopic or documentary), this one is curiously resistant to letting the audience hear its subject's songs in their entirety.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The real protagonist is the family itself -- a fragile, complex organism undermined by internal conflict and menaced by the cruelty and indifference of the society around them.

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