For 1,100 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 A Mighty Wind
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
1,100 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The film, which includes some breathtakingly beautiful images of the green, wet Guyanese jungle and a monumental waterfall that cuts through it, is driven less by narrative than by ideas and impressions.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Mantegna, who as an actor is one of the leading interpreters of Mr. Mamet's work, gives generous room to the movie's first-rate ensemble.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    For all its echoes of Frank Capra and Charlie Chaplin (as well as Ford), the movie is also a love letter to modern Tokyo, whose alleyways and skyscrapers are drafted with flawless precision and tinted with tenderness and warmth.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Whether or not The River is, as some critics have claimed, Mr. Tsai's masterpiece, it is an excellent introduction to his oblique narrative style, his favored themes and his careful, lyrical visual sensibility.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Wargnier's sumptuous, moving new film, captures both the hope of the returning Russians and their brutal betrayal.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Though its story may sound formulaic on paper, please take my word for it: Monsieur Lazhar, written and directed by Philippe Falardeau, is a sharply intelligent, deeply sad, and not remotely sappy film about both teaching and collective grief.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    "For my vision of the cinema," Orson Welles once said, "editing is not simply one aspect. It is the aspect." According to Edge Codes.com, a wonderfully informative new documentary, what was true for Welles's cinema is true for the medium as a whole.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It finds a way to make the play's rich, dense literary language (just before the climactic battle, one character accuses another of "breaking his oath and resolution like/A twist of rotten silk") sound as terse and urgent as the dialogue in a tightly plotted action thriller.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    With Quitting, he (Zhang) has removed sentimentality from the theme and presented it with unflinching honesty, a quality he shares with his fearless cast.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Leconte seems at last to have anchored his cinematic gifts to a story worth caring about.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The revelation of Hateship Loveship is the casting of Kristen Wiig, who effortlessly makes the shift from comedian to straight dramatic actress in a role full of potential ego traps that she never falls into.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Instead of prying into his soul, the filmmakers investigate his working conditions and offer a sort of backstage ethnographic study of the professional stand-up culture.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like its humor, the film's sentiment sneaks up on you, and so does the dramatic reversal that makes it something more than a collection of wry anecdotes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Blue Ruin is a Clint Eastwood vigilante fantasy with an anti-Clint at its center—small-statured, round-faced, nervous Dwight (Macon Blair), whose burning desire to avenge the long-ago murder of his parents doesn’t make him one whit less terrified of actually doing it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This is a movie that traffics in deep hindbrain emotions: fear and rage and lust and, above all, the pure animal drive to go on living.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Poignant though it is, the movie is the opposite of depressing. There is too much life in it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Moonrise Kingdom is fun: a gorgeously shot, ingeniously crafted, über-Andersonian bonbon that, even in its most irritatingly whimsical moments, remains an effective deliverer of cinematic pleasure.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Though her movie has a clear narrative line, and might even be classified as romantic comedy, it is also a meticulously constructed visual artifact, diffidently introducing the playful, rebus-like qualities of installation art to the conventions of narrative cinema.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Waugh's dialogue, effortlessly catching the lockjaw intonations and facetious mannerisms of the British aristocracy between the world wars, is a gift to screenwriters and performers alike. The actors Mr. Fry has assembled receive the gift with gusto and grace.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It is a small, plain movie, shot in 16 millimeter in dull locations around Boston; but also, like its passive, quizzical heroine, it is unexpectedly seductive, and even, in its own stubborn, hesitant way, beautiful.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    While this film can seem politically simplistic, it is nonetheless psychologically astute, and more complicated than it at first appears.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    (Director Bigelow) piles up one nerve-racking crisis after another, interspersed with moments of ethereal, almost otherworldly beauty.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The most shocking thing about it may be its unabashed sincerity.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Full of nuance and complexity, but it is also as accessible and engrossing as a grand 19th-century novel.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Happy People's images of the Taiga, while often breathtaking, come from the standard visual language of nature documentary: in between interviews with villagers, cutaways to icicles hanging from branches or dawn breaking over an expanse of snow. It's Herzog's inventive use of voice-over that elevates the film above an extremely well-researched episode of "Nature."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The ultimate praise given to sports movies is always, "Even if you don't care about sport X, you'll care about these characters," and that's certainly true of Undefeated (I don't, and I did).
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This is not to say that Gravity is a masterpiece: Unlike Cuarón’s extraordinary "Children of Men", it doesn’t quite pull off its ambitious effort to combine formal inventiveness, heart-pounding action, and intimate human storytelling. But it succeeds thrillingly at the first two of those categories, and only misses the mark on the last because it tries a little too hard — which is certainly a welcome respite from the countless sci-fi thrillers that privilege the human story not at all.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Very much a writer's film: Mr. Schickel's elegant, occasionally knotty prose, read by Sidney Pollack, offers a clear, nuanced interpretation of the artist's work in relation to his life.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This is a small movie about a small world, but its modesty is part of what makes it durable and satisfying.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Days of Future Past is the kind of extravagant production that sweeps you up in a sense of mythic grandeur even as you struggle to follow what’s going on.

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