Daniel M. Gold

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For 105 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 11% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Daniel M. Gold's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 90 How to Change the World
Lowest review score: 0 United Passions
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 105
  2. Negative: 11 out of 105
105 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Daniel M. Gold
    This absorbing account is hardly definitive, but it teaches movement building without denying the high costs paid by true believers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    [A] rich and fascinating biography.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    The film’s primary mission is to destigmatize dyslexia, and it achieves that admirably, presenting technical material with a light touch and compassion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    All the film’s segments are smartly assembled and gracefully paced.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    This vivid and haunting essay steps away from the debate about illegal immigration.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    Less of a solemn pilgrimage than a folksy visit, this film is a chance to set a spell, watch longtime musicians play and boast and reflect about their lives on and off the road.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    Gahan Wilson: Born Dead, Still Weird skillfully introduces this pleasant man with the demented visions and delves into how he got them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    It’s surprising there has never really been an extended cinematic exploration of the band. Long Strange Trip, ambitiously assembled and elegantly directed by Amir Bar-Lev, fills that void.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    As an overview of the issues, the history and the players, Starving the Beast makes a powerful survey course, a prerequisite for further studies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    A fascinating account of off-the-books diplomacy in the 1980s, “Plot for Peace” is that rare documentary that both augments the historical record and is paced like a thriller.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    At slightly more than an hour, the film may not be definitive, and its chronology is a little fuzzy. Even so, Rubble Kings is a fascinating, valuable work of social, music and New York history, a celebration of a peaceful revolution by those who helped birth it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    Only a few scenes fail to draw laughs in a movie that’s unexpectedly smart and consistently amusing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    I was just at the right place at the right time,” Mr. Petrov says, a simple truth that becomes shocking when considering the alternative. For that alone, this account of a Cold War near miss deserves a wide audience.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    The movie’s grittiness — the director, Jim Taihuttu (“Rabat”), shoots Wolf in black and white — its intrigues, its graphic violence and Mr. Kenzari’s performance make for a worthy addition to the annals of gangster films, Interpol edition.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    What Class Divide does exceptionally well is capture the sense of change at warp speed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    With its evocative landscapes and its non-narrative, cinéma vérité style, Western is a layered, atmospheric chronicle of living traditions like bullfights and rodeos, mariachi bands and Texas two-steps. Yet the film also records the tremors of change.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    Paced by Eddie Palmieri’s up-tempo, percussive score, “Doin’ It” bounces like a crossover dribble, gliding swiftly and surely through interviews, videos and history lessons, then transitioning to today’s dedicated ballers and playground culture.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    The Ataxian has moments of inspiration, beauty, even euphoria. But its lasting contribution is in making the world a little more familiar with this disease, and a little less lonely for the families struggling against it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel M. Gold
    Ms. Vreeland has paced her documentary well, a chapter to each era, with hundreds of beautiful images spanning decades of artists, galleries, parties, scenes. She also makes good use of interviews Guggenheim gave to a biographer a couple of years before her death in 1979.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    An achingly poignant documentary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    While affirming the dignity of its subjects, Mala Mala shows there’s little glamour attached to the pursuit of selfhood.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    The Rooftop is frenzied, funny and knowing, drenched in lavish, often surreal, imagery.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    What elevates the film beyond a video scrapbook, though, are the glimpses of the routines and slow rhythms of the nursing home before and after this adventure.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    The director Emilio Aragón wisely trains the camera on Mr. Duvall. A Night in Old Mexico is his baby, and he rocks it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    The vistas are spectacular, the waves fearsome, the filming often amazing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    Hôtel Normandy is a confection spun differently from the typical Hollywood rom-com.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    As the film makes abundantly clear, if left untreated, contagions — of ignorance, fear and conflict — will spread wherever they can.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    The Battered Bastards of Baseball is an affectionate scrapbook of a documentary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    As travelogue, this is a persuasive introduction.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Daniel M. Gold
    Scattering history lessons and ambiguous imagery amid Ms. Yoo’s engagement with North Koreans, her film implicitly asks: What must they think of us?

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