For 159 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Calhoun's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Interstellar
Lowest review score: 20 The Last Face
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 89 out of 159
  2. Negative: 2 out of 159
159 movie reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    The Coens have given us a melancholic, sometimes cruel, often hilarious counterfactual version of music history. It's a what-if imagining of a cultural also-ran that maybe tells us more about the truth than the facts themselves ever could.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s an exploration of all things surface, yes, but it has soul too.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    From this simple, not especially unique love story, Kechiche has fashioned an intimate epic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s an intoxicating marvel, strange and sublime: it combines sci-fi ideas, gloriously unusual special effects and a sharp atmosphere of horror.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Alongside archive material and new footage of Chet shot in his signature romantic, B&W style, Weber elicits frank reminiscences from his subject and a host of ex-lovers and friends.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    As ever with Leigh, Mr Turner addresses the big questions with small moments. It's an extraordinary film, all at once strange, entertaining, thoughtful and exciting.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Most importantly, the film involves us: it draws us into the debate, makes us complicit, demands that we have an opinion, and then upends that same opinion a few minutes later. It's engaging and rousing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a joyous film, full of love and warmth but unafraid to admit that with sticking out your neck comes struggle and sorrow. Truly lovely.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    The film conceals as much as it reveals, and its beauty is that it pretends to do nothing else. It embraces a mystery and protects it, and it’s thrilling to behold.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a bold, beautiful cosmic adventure story with a touch of the surreal and the dreamlike, and yet it always feels grounded in its own deadly serious reality.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a film of small moments and tiny gestures that leaves a very, very big impression.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Gestures, looks and touches carry enormous weight, and Blanchett and Mara, both excellent, invite micropscopic readings of their every glance and movement.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s both soaringly romantic and truly sad.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Everything about this film makes you look with fresh eyes at the familiar.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    What’s most winning about ‘The Club’ is how Larrain manages to allude to the wider structures, behaviour and corruption of the church without ever making this claustrophobic, moody and very local story feel anything but crucial, thrilling and disturbing.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not a despairing movie – Mungiu even suggests that a new generation might put things right – but it’s a brutally honest one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s enthralling and haunting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    A stop-gap tale that’s modest, fun and briefly amusing rather than one that breaks new ground or offers hugely memorable set pieces.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Scarecrow’ feels like an existential fairytale squarely rooted in the reality of America’s fraying backroads and small towns. It’s all a little rambling and anarchic, but later scenes in a jail have real bite. And when the sadness behind Lion’s smile is revealed, it’s also genuinely moving.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    If Heli lacks enough focus and thematic clarity to make it properly special, it's still winningly provocative and always compelling.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    More than ever Payne allows the humour to rise up gently from his story rather than burst through it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is a portrait of cycles and change. But the mood of the film suggests that we should be impressed that this ever-growing, ever-changing city of ours is still chasing after new versions of the modern.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Feels both modern and traditional – a halfway house between the broodier Nolan way of shaking things up and the louder, bone-crunching style that director Zack Snyder established with films such as ‘300’ and ‘Sucker Punch’. Man of Steel is punchy, engaging and fun, even if it slips into a final 45 minutes of explosions and fights during which reason starts to vanish and the science gets muddy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Rush is fast, slippery, stormy and dangerous.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It's a terrifically moving film that has a fitting earthbound feel to it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    A masterclass in how the most local, most hemmed-in stories can reverberate with the power of big, universal themes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    One of the most pleasing things about Blue Jasmine is that it feels truly knotty and never obvious in how it unfolds.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This punky adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s novel Filth is a glossary of grimness, a dictionary of darkness. But it also dishes up humour that’s blacker than a winter’s night in the Highlands and unpolished anarchy that’s true to Welsh’s out-there, frighteningly frank prose.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s lightly played, often very funny and shot all over Paris with energy and wit, and boosted by superb, inquiring turns from Broadbent and Duncan.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not a pretty story, but its warmth lies in its fondness – love, even – for the two boys at its heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Baldwin and Toback make a snappy comic duo, and half of their talks with a line-up of luminaries focus on the art of filmmaking rather than the business.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    We’re never far from Von Trier, and both Skarsgård and Gainsbourg appear to offer different versions of the author himself.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    There’s plenty of flesh (much of it belonging to porn doubles), although the film is rarely, if ever, what most people would call erotic or pornographic. It’s neither deeply serious nor totally insincere; hovering somewhere between the two, it creates its own mesmerising power.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The Invisible Woman is only partly a romance; it’s the tragedy of Nelly’s life that makes itself more powerfully heard.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s no masterpiece, but it’s slick and tense, and the camerawork has something of the in-the-moment, on-the-ground immediacy of the French New Wave films.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Full of Anderson’s visual signatures – cameras that swerve, quick zooms, speedy montages – it’s familiar in style, refreshing in tone and one of Anderson’s very best films.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    When the film gets outdoors, it soars, and Ceylan continues to dig with acute intelligence into the dark corners of everyday human behaviour.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    With Dolan, you feel you're in the company of a truly original voice and one unafraid to make his mistakes right up there on the screen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    As the actors move fluidly between various states, shedding one skin while assuming another, Polanski makes this subversive parlour game matter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Politics and entertainment are never an easy mix, and Jimmy’s Hall is a familiar, slightly unsurprising coming together of the two from Loach and his writer Paul Laverty. Sometimes you can see the joins, but there’s also great warmth, charm and humour among the ideas, and the sense of time and place is especially strong.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Exhibition succeeds in making us feel deeply uncomfortable for peering into other people’s lives.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Hogg displays a welcome desire to draw on global film influences and ignore the unwritten rules of what British cinema should or should not seek to achieve, especially in the realm of films about the monied and unsympathetic.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Archipelago confirms Hogg as a daring and mischievous artist, and a major British talent whose next move will be intriguing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Dunst handles her sidekick role with a mature ease that’s new to her, but it’s the men you remember: Mortensen in psychological freefall and Isaac always tough to read and hiding something behind a handsome, controlled exterior. It’s a gentle and smart blast from the past.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Its various riffs on codes, whether moral, sexual, societal or German, are plain to see rather than enigmatic or enlightening. Luckily it’s all anchored in a storming performance from Cumberbatch: you’ll be deciphering his work long after the credits roll.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    You won’t know whether to laugh or cry.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Citizenfour is at its most eye-opening and essential simply as a portrait of the then 29-year-old Snowden at a point of absolute no-return in his life as he spends almost a week hiding out in Hong Kong before disappearing into an entirely new existence.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The original footage – devastatingly intimate; familiar yet alien – still stops us in our tracks more than six decades later.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s charmingly simple. But it also offers a sharp modern spin on Michael Bond’s London-set stories without being cynical.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is a whale of a movie, grotesque and a little bloated but impossible to ignore. Its power and its horrors sneak up on you.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Maybe an hour would have been enough, but even the slower patches have charm to burn.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Catch Me Daddy feels authentic and informed, but wears its research lightly and prefers to thrust us into the atmosphere of the moment rather than offer too much background or tie things up neatly.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The film is not without its problems – Michelle Williams is an elusive lead, and a wide array of characters come at the expense of depth – but it’s a knotty, thoughtful piece of work nonetheless.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Amy
    Anyone with a beating heart will be forgiven for allowing it to break during this unflinching and thoughtful account of the life and death of the soul singer Amy Winehouse.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    At times, you ache to put the brakes on the chaos, but still Pixar manages to do with all this what they do best, turning the everyday rough and smooth of childhood experience into a thoughtful, inventive adventure, full of totally appropriate lurid and strange imagery.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Tale of Tales might lack magic in the immediate, flashy sense, but its strange spell is altogether seductive and special.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The Assassin is a beautiful, beguiling film; it's impossible not to get fully lost in its rarefied world.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Rohrwacher draws us into this unusual world with the ease of someone who knows exactly what they’re talking about, neither judging nor celebrating and, at her best, just looking with tenderness and a winning sense of humour.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    As filmmaking, X+Y is unassuming and not entirely remarkable, but the relationships play so sweetly and memorably.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    U.N.C.L.E. has enough style and smarts to make it an amusingly louche summer movie: a cultivated mix of action and wit, suits and cities, that feels refreshingly analogue in a digital world.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Director and co-writer Diego Quemada-Díez condenses many acute observations about life as an emigrant into a sure-footed, credible story.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Writer-director Anna Muylaert’s observations on family relations and invisible-but-firm class barriers are always acute.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Kormákur creates such a convincing world – the craft of this film is astonishing – that you’re willing to forgive its less delicate touches in favour of its totally compelling depiction of what it must be like to ascend into a place that’s heaven one moment and hell the very next.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    In what is surely his finest hour, Tom Hardy plays both brothers. Much more than a gimmick, it’s like watching one side of a mind wrestle with the other – literally, in one explosive, fun-to-unpick fight scene.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It's an endearingly loopy, occasionally half-cooked but always ambitious film.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Pan
    This Pan is loud, colourful, busy and full of ideas. Not all those ideas work in sync – but most are bold and some are winningly eccentric.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The Program offers no obvious new revelations and Armstrong remains elusive – but it has an unsettling air that carries us through its more pedestrian patches.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Timoner refuses to run fully with Brand’s elevated idea of himself, preferring to offer glimpses of a vulnerability and ruthlessness behind the clownish bluster.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not all doom, gloom and personal disasters — the film also offers lucid insights on the links between the man and his movies.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Skyfall is a highly distinctive Bond movie. It has some stunning visual touches.... Also, it mostly manages to convince us that there’s something at stake by giving a hint of Bond’s emotional life beyond this story.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    David Sington (In the Shadow of the Moon) shows extreme confidence in his subject by revealing the deeper truth in fragments, essentially allowing Nick to deliver a monologue or one man show, drawing us deeper and deeper into his story.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is a simple, sweet tale about the basic pleasures of home and hearth, rendered unflashily in a delightful style of hand-drawn animation that employs a beautiful array of warm pastel colours.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    What makes this more than just a punishing, fearful, expertly crafted thriller focused on one man’s endurance is heavily down to Emmanuel Lubezki’s attractive, thoughtful photography.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Brand is a winning – cuddly even – bridge between his film’s ideology and the wider world.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The world that Zootropolis creates is intelligent and fascinatingly detailed – it feels more like a movie by Disney-owned Pixar than a straight Disney film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is sombre, artful and winningly ambiguous.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The connections might be a little more strained and diffuse than in "Nostalgia for the Light", but their cumulative power is strong nonetheless.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It's a heady brew, awkwardly told, but smartly provocative.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Once you get past some bumps in the road of believability, Our Kind of Traitor turns into a brisk, energetic drama, with Anthony Dod Mantle’s photography adding interesting layers to a fairly straightforward plot.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Flaws aside, this is a superior, inventive kids' film, and one that's bound to make Rylance's giant a favourite with younger audiences.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It might be familiar territory for Almodóvar, but only a master of his art could make it look so easy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    As a storyteller, Farr is bold enough to keep us guessing until the film’s final moments, but a late need to explain lets the film down a little.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The film's quietly angry plea is for compassion, understanding and more than one eye open on this modern horror.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    An intimate, warm embrace of a film, it radiates joy and harmony despite playing out entirely in the shadow of a difficult father's death.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Hull clearly had a profound and lucid response to his blindness, and this thoughtful, illuminating film goes some way to inhabiting his thoughts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not a happy watch – but it’s an essential one if you want better to understand the city and people around you.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The film’s said to be autobiographical, but that’s entirely left to us to guess.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Thematically, White Elephant is a vague animal and its true interest never truly comes into focus.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    If the crime element feels like little more than a red herring, it’s the characters that give the film its appeal.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Beyond the shocks and games, there's not a great deal to take away in the form of meaty ideas or lingering themes, and its catchy premise doesn't really deliver in the end.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It's to Ozon's credit that he never serves up easy answers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    What Luhrmann makes intoxicating is a sense of place – the houses, the rooms, the city, the roads – and the sense that all this is unfolding in a bubble like some mad fable. Where he falters is in persuading us that these are real, breathing folk whose experiences and destinies can move us.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Luckily, Hawke and Delpy remain as charming as ever, and their combined goofiness is more endearing than annoying. Winning, too, is the sense that this peculiar project, though imperfect, could grow old with its audience and its cast.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    If its script is a little unwieldy and overwrought at times, Broken is still a work of delightful moments and strong promise for many of those involved. Norris works hard to inject some joy and wonder into what could easily be a much more dark and miserable experience.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There’s nothing groundbreaking about the animation or script. That said, the characters and story still offer low-key charms.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s anarchic, sometimes amusing, intermittently tedious, with ideas about digital alienation and the corruption of technology that too often feel blunt and tired.

Top Trailers