For 76 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Calhoun's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Blue Is the Warmest Color
Lowest review score: 20 Only God Forgives
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 41 out of 76
  2. Negative: 1 out of 76
76 movie reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    The Coens have given us a melancholic, sometimes cruel, often hilarious counterfactual version of music history. It's a what-if imagining of a cultural also-ran that maybe tells us more about the truth than the facts themselves ever could.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s an exploration of all things surface, yes, but it has soul too.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    From this simple, not especially unique love story, Kechiche has fashioned an intimate epic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s an intoxicating marvel, strange and sublime: it combines sci-fi ideas, gloriously unusual special effects and a sharp atmosphere of horror.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Alongside archive material and new footage of Chet shot in his signature romantic, B&W style, Weber elicits frank reminiscences from his subject and a host of ex-lovers and friends.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    As ever with Leigh, Mr Turner addresses the big questions with small moments. It's an extraordinary film, all at once strange, entertaining, thoughtful and exciting.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Most importantly, the film involves us: it draws us into the debate, makes us complicit, demands that we have an opinion, and then upends that same opinion a few minutes later. It's engaging and rousing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a joyous film, full of love and warmth but unafraid to admit that with sticking out your neck comes struggle and sorrow. Truly lovely.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    The film conceals as much as it reveals, and its beauty is that it pretends to do nothing else. It embraces a mystery and protects it, and it’s thrilling to behold.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    A stop-gap tale that’s modest, fun and briefly amusing rather than one that breaks new ground or offers hugely memorable set pieces.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Scarecrow’ feels like an existential fairytale squarely rooted in the reality of America’s fraying backroads and small towns. It’s all a little rambling and anarchic, but later scenes in a jail have real bite. And when the sadness behind Lion’s smile is revealed, it’s also genuinely moving.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    If Heli lacks enough focus and thematic clarity to make it properly special, it's still winningly provocative and always compelling.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    More than ever Payne allows the humour to rise up gently from his story rather than burst through it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This is a portrait of cycles and change. But the mood of the film suggests that we should be impressed that this ever-growing, ever-changing city of ours is still chasing after new versions of the modern.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Feels both modern and traditional – a halfway house between the broodier Nolan way of shaking things up and the louder, bone-crunching style that director Zack Snyder established with films such as ‘300’ and ‘Sucker Punch’. Man of Steel is punchy, engaging and fun, even if it slips into a final 45 minutes of explosions and fights during which reason starts to vanish and the science gets muddy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Rush is fast, slippery, stormy and dangerous.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It's a terrifically moving film that has a fitting earthbound feel to it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    A masterclass in how the most local, most hemmed-in stories can reverberate with the power of big, universal themes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    One of the most pleasing things about Blue Jasmine is that it feels truly knotty and never obvious in how it unfolds.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This punky adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s novel Filth is a glossary of grimness, a dictionary of darkness. But it also dishes up humour that’s blacker than a winter’s night in the Highlands and unpolished anarchy that’s true to Welsh’s out-there, frighteningly frank prose.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s lightly played, often very funny and shot all over Paris with energy and wit, and boosted by superb, inquiring turns from Broadbent and Duncan.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not a pretty story, but its warmth lies in its fondness – love, even – for the two boys at its heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Baldwin and Toback make a snappy comic duo, and half of their talks with a line-up of luminaries focus on the art of filmmaking rather than the business.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    We’re never far from Von Trier, and both Skarsgård and Gainsbourg appear to offer different versions of the author himself.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    There’s plenty of flesh (much of it belonging to porn doubles), although the film is rarely, if ever, what most people would call erotic or pornographic. It’s neither deeply serious nor totally insincere; hovering somewhere between the two, it creates its own mesmerising power.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The Invisible Woman is only partly a romance; it’s the tragedy of Nelly’s life that makes itself more powerfully heard.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s no masterpiece, but it’s slick and tense, and the camerawork has something of the in-the-moment, on-the-ground immediacy of the French New Wave films.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Full of Anderson’s visual signatures – cameras that swerve, quick zooms, speedy montages – it’s familiar in style, refreshing in tone and one of Anderson’s very best films.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    When the film gets outdoors, it soars, and Ceylan continues to dig with acute intelligence into the dark corners of everyday human behaviour.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    With Dolan, you feel you're in the company of a truly original voice and one unafraid to make his mistakes right up there on the screen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    As the actors move fluidly between various states, shedding one skin while assuming another, Polanski makes this subversive parlour game matter.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Politics and entertainment are never an easy mix, and Jimmy’s Hall is a familiar, slightly unsurprising coming together of the two from Loach and his writer Paul Laverty. Sometimes you can see the joins, but there’s also great warmth, charm and humour among the ideas, and the sense of time and place is especially strong.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Exhibition succeeds in making us feel deeply uncomfortable for peering into other people’s lives.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Hogg displays a welcome desire to draw on global film influences and ignore the unwritten rules of what British cinema should or should not seek to achieve, especially in the realm of films about the monied and unsympathetic.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Archipelago confirms Hogg as a daring and mischievous artist, and a major British talent whose next move will be intriguing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Dunst handles her sidekick role with a mature ease that’s new to her, but it’s the men you remember: Mortensen in psychological freefall and Isaac always tough to read and hiding something behind a handsome, controlled exterior. It’s a gentle and smart blast from the past.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Its various riffs on codes, whether moral, sexual, societal or German, are plain to see rather than enigmatic or enlightening. Luckily it’s all anchored in a storming performance from Cumberbatch: you’ll be deciphering his work long after the credits roll.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    You won’t know whether to laugh or cry.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Citizenfour is at its most eye-opening and essential simply as a portrait of the then 29-year-old Snowden at a point of absolute no-return in his life as he spends almost a week hiding out in Hong Kong before disappearing into an entirely new existence.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The film’s said to be autobiographical, but that’s entirely left to us to guess.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Thematically, White Elephant is a vague animal and its true interest never truly comes into focus.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    If the crime element feels like little more than a red herring, it’s the characters that give the film its appeal.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Beyond the shocks and games, there's not a great deal to take away in the form of meaty ideas or lingering themes, and its catchy premise doesn't really deliver in the end.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It's to Ozon's credit that he never serves up easy answers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    What Luhrmann makes intoxicating is a sense of place – the houses, the rooms, the city, the roads – and the sense that all this is unfolding in a bubble like some mad fable. Where he falters is in persuading us that these are real, breathing folk whose experiences and destinies can move us.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Luckily, Hawke and Delpy remain as charming as ever, and their combined goofiness is more endearing than annoying. Winning, too, is the sense that this peculiar project, though imperfect, could grow old with its audience and its cast.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    If its script is a little unwieldy and overwrought at times, Broken is still a work of delightful moments and strong promise for many of those involved. Norris works hard to inject some joy and wonder into what could easily be a much more dark and miserable experience.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There’s nothing groundbreaking about the animation or script. That said, the characters and story still offer low-key charms.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s anarchic, sometimes amusing, intermittently tedious, with ideas about digital alienation and the corruption of technology that too often feel blunt and tired.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s adequate and often fun, but no match for Cumberbatch’s talents: physically, his Assange is far more complex and intriguing than most of the things we hear him say or see him do.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It has a rigorous, even unrelenting, grey, green and brown palette and, narratively, it’s tough to penetrate.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There’s a pleasing no-frills tone to the whole enterprise as well as a convincing grasp of the rituals and beliefs of the age.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The unusually extended shooting period and Winterbottom’s decision to cast siblings as the kids make for a strangely intimate and powerful depiction of time passing and the peaks and troughs of childhood.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There are no interviews, characters nor narration, and after an hour it can feel like a chore. Yet the images are staggering.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Cloying at times – but always good-natured.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    If you’ve never been to a burlesque show, now you know what you’re missing. The dedication and warmth of the performers are infectious.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Only Lovers Left Alive drags its feet and shows serious signs of anaemia as a story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Ayoade tips his hat to so many other filmmakers and writers that he leaves little room to consider anything other than what a good job he’s doing of distilling all his references into an effective Pinterest board of paranoia and alienation.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    What stops David Cronenberg’s grotesque noir Maps to the Stars, written by LA insider Bruce Wagner, from feeling tired is that it’s deliciously odd.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Sometimes you find yourself wishing for an alternative version of the film unfolding before your eyes. ‘Belle’ is a good-looking and exceedingly polite film where perhaps a more complex one with less good manners would have been better.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Hats off to Dreamworks for offering some bold surprises in a respectable sequel filled with moments of humour and emotion among its ample noise and movement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a film that moves to the convincing rhythm of real life.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    There are times when it feels underpowered or unfocused... but this is an intelligent, sensitive debut.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    A charismatic performance from Downey Jr and the growling presence of Duvall makes up for a multitude of sins in this big and brash family drama that puts the heavy emphasis on drama over family.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    '71
    Demange is a strong storyteller and masks the script’s tendency to nod to every opinion and social division by offering a masterclass in tension as soon as his dramatic bomb starts ticking.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    [A] baggy revenge thriller consisting of short violent set pieces interspersed with far too many talky debates about the morality of protecting a killer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    The Immigrant promises rich territory to explore, but in the execution it’s overly stately, dreary and unconvincing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    It’s intricate and often mature as drama, but it’s also meandering and at times heavy-handed, even melodramatic, and the tight control of time, place and action which made ‘A Separation’ so gripping is just not there.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    There are only so many scenes anyone can take of Law (never suited to the geezer role) strutting down streets shooting his gob off. If it was all in service of a smart story, so be it. But it isn’t.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Beneath the well-tuned atmospherics lurks a schlocky, fairly ludicrous and pretty distasteful yarn that ultimately puts the stress in all the wrong places.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Grace of Monaco could have been a camp delight, but it feels too much like a stodgy, outdated television movie to work even as kitsch.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    Sentimental and shallow, although just passable as a kids’ movie.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Calhoun
    Style over substance doesn’t really tell the half of it: you can bathe a corpse in groovy light and dress it in an expensive suit, but in the end that rotting smell just won’t go away.