For 115 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Kehr's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Lowest review score: 25 Basic Instinct
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 68 out of 115
  2. Negative: 11 out of 115
115 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    As a screenplay Tequila Sunrise is a very impressive piece of work. But as a movie, it's knotty and confused. [2 Dec 1988, p.B]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    There is a great deal of value in Branagh's version, not least in his own lead performance as a soft, indefinite Henry who defines himself over the course of the play. [15 Dec 1989]
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    The world of Wall Street is that of a lush soap opera-"Dynasty" with a moral. It gets the barn burning, all right, but it has no impact. [11 Dec 1987, p.A]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    Big
    Big moves with polish and assurance. It's too soon to tell whether Marshall has anything of her own to say, but Big is proof that she can handle the Hollywood machine, and that is no small thing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    A satire is only as good as its subject, and in the very funny I'm Gonna Git You Sucka, Keenen Ivory Wayans has found a rich and relatively untapped one. The wit and openness of I'm Gonna Git You Sucka has more to contribute to race relations than the smug piety of "Mississippi Burning." As a positive image, a good, shared laugh is hard to beat. [14 Dec 1988, p.1]
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    A smart, spectacular and rousing piece of work, one that strains against but can't quite escape the natural limitations imposed by a sequel. [4 July 1990, p.C1]
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    Prince of Darkness is a real tour de force, and a welcome return.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Dave Kehr
    Nightwatch is more stylish and well-plotted than your typical slasher film, but it doesn't quite stand out in a world where the horrific has become routine. [17 Apr 1998]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A few moments of sly inspiration are not enough to carry an entire feature; along with the tears, it leaves behind an aftertaste of phoniness. [16 March 1990, Friday, p.H]
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    An idealized, dreamy fantasy of life in the business world-harmless as airplane reading, a bit dull on the big screen. [2 Mar 1990, Friday, p.C]
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Emerges as cutty, indistinct and confused, full of shots that don't match and spatial conceptions that would look flat even on TV. The more Branagh strains to appear “cinematic,'' the more he looks like a man of the theater. [23 Aug 1991, Friday, p.B]
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It's meant to be open, heartwarming and real, but beneath its often attractively performed surface, the clichés are grinding as heavily as in any ''Rambo'' picture [21 Oct 1988]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It is an intriguing subject, though so far all that Morris has brought to it is a combination of the morbid and the cruel; he needs to develop some sympathy, too. [16 Sept 1988]
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    McTiernan, regrettably, seems more interested in spectacle than suspense, and the attack sequences are filmed for splashy visual impact. And an apocalyptic finale that raises the antiwar message to the nuclear level is more than McTiernan's metaphor can bear. [12 June 1987, Friday, p.J]
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It's Mary Stuart Masterson, bringing a depth and tenacity to her role that nowhere appears in the screenplay, who leaves the lasting impression. She escapes the airiness of Hughes's vision to establish something like a human being. [22 Feb 1987]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Boys N the Hood wants to be “The Learning Tree'' and “Super Fly'' at once, an ambition that doesn't seem quite honest. [12 July 1991]
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    An air of embarrassing familiarity hangs over the entire project, as if it were a story told by an aging relative not quite aware of how many times, and how much better, he has been over the same material before. [25 Dec 1990, Tempo, p.1]
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The details of this Twin Peaks are slight and repetitious, and their meanings are numbingly obvious. Behind small town America's facade of sweetness and light, there exist darkness and evil-news that is a day late and about $7.50 short. [28 Aug 1992]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Though the costumes are beautifully designed, the chateau locations carefully chosen and the dialogue full of curling locutions, something cloddish and naive still comes through in Frears' direction, and not only because he can seldom get his shots to match. [13 Jan 1989, Friday, p.A]
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Depardieu has so much life on screen, so much bounding energy and insistent physicality, that he almost brings it off.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Paul Verhoeven's RoboCop is a stylish piece of work that leaves a sour aftertaste. [17 Jul 1987]
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Kuzui has imposed a heavily block-lettered feminist message on the movie, suggesting that Buffy discovers her empowerment as a woman by driving huge, phallic stakes through the hearts of her enemies. In this case, having it all means being feminine and bloodthirsty, too. [31 Jul 1992, p.B]
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    If the film's diffidence is its greatest charm, it is also, in the end, its greatest limitation-it's a movie that seems afraid to declare itself, to make the big move that might propel it from the pleasant to the memorable. [03 Aug 1990]
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Class Action occupies itself with long passages of family melodrama, most of it as familiar as the courtroom drama but far less entertaining. [15 Mar 1991]
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Hysteria, however skillfully maintained, should never be mistaken for art-a caution that applies equally to Stone and his subject. [01 Mar 1991]
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It has a few good laughs in it thanks to Murphy, but mainly depends for its appeal on an uncomfortable manipulation of racial stereotypes. [04 Dec 1992]
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The film is finally impersonal, almost anonymous; it's a chilly, lumbering project that carries little of the mark of lived experience. [25 Dec 1992]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    for all its flaws, Born on the Fourth of July provides the final proof that Tom Cruise is the real thing-a movie star with all the natural, unforced ability to connect with an audience that the title implies. [20 Dec 1989, p.1]
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    If Zeffirelli's Hamlet does resemble an actual movie at several points, it's thanks almost entirely to the inventive and atmospheric lighting of veteran cinematographer David Watkin, whose somber, gray-green palette gives the film a dignity and substance it would otherwise lack. [18 Jan 1991]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Awakenings is a film that unquestionably succeeds on its own terms, though those terms are deeply suspect. It is a canny piece of false art, one that consistently swaps meaning for superficial effect. [20 Dec 1990, p.1]