For 759 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Kehr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 After Hours
Lowest review score: 0 Vulgar
Score distribution:
759 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    A product neither of Hollywood nor the New York-Sundance indie axis, Manna From Heaven is a true outsider film, and while it would be easy to fault its lack of technical polish, somewhat discursive script and uneven performances, it is also refreshingly sincere, gentle and good-natured.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    Major League is a movie that knows what it's up to. It skims along agreeable surfaces, expertly balancing its comedy with melodrama and fulfilling expectations right on schedule. As a movie, it`s a superior industrial product.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It's a movie that doesn't have an original thought in its head, and seems to like it that way.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The landscape photography is magnificent...But its stereotypical characters, melodramatic plotting and audience-pleasing close-ups of adorable children all suggest the profound limitations of filmmaking by committee, whether that committee meets in Beijing or Burbank.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Dave Kehr
    Miller's finely crafted, highly moving new film, seems meant as a new beginning, grounded in an entirely different kind of material and told in an entirely different manner than anything Miller has attempted before.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Dave Kehr
    The first starring vehicle for shock comic Andrew Dice Clay, The Adventures of Ford Fairlane, turns out to be the kind of detective spoof worn out 30 years ago by Bob Hope and Jerry Lewis, though refitted with salty language, graphic violence and an attitude toward women that makes the Marquis de Sade look like Phil Donahue. [11 Jul 1990, p.18]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Finally fails to escape the conventions of the Hollywood cinema it so proudly deplores.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Lopes along amiably enough, offering a few smiles and the standard bromides about the importance of being yourself and pursuing your dreams. It's tolerable but forgettable.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    In both Twist and "Idaho," the act of placing a larger-than-life literary figure in a constrained, narrowly naturalistic environment merely strips the characters of their scale and interest.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    An unusually successful attempt to mate good drama with political analysis.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Dave Kehr
    Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, and Jerry Zucker, the directors of the smash Airplane! and the underrated Top Secret!, here turn their hands to a more traditional character comedy, yet this film's funniest effects still come through their imaginative, frequently astonishing manipulations of the narrative line. It's a rare kind of craftsmanship, and it produces a rare kind of pleasure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Despite its blatant mediocrity, this 1981 British film knocked 'em dead everywhere, which makes me suspect that audiences weren't responding to the film itself as much as to the attitudes that underlie it.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Quickly collapses into an overloaded, slow-moving series of predictable jokes and forced situations.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    This movie is Ms. Davis's fourth film as a director, and she has a bright, chipper style that keeps things moving, while never quite managing to connect her wish-fulfilling characters to the human race. Like someone who smiles too much, Amy's Orgasm seems rather sad at heart.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Once upon a time this was known as "the power of positive thinking," and it didn't involve nearly so much math.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    In this third outing for the Griswolds - following the dismal "National Lampoon's European Vacation" in 1985 - the satirical edge has given way to sentimentality and a whiff of smugness, while the black humor has degenerated into broad slapstick. It's a tribute to first-time director Jeremiah Chechik's fine sense of timing that the obvious physical gags still generate some substantial laughs, though they arrive almost in spite of Hughes' tired script. [1 Dec 1989, p.Friday A]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The film is a celebration of youthful romanticism and youthful nihilism, two philosophies that are often indistinguishable from each other where Nadja is set: Manhattan's East Village, with its tiny, secretive bars and tumultuous street life.
    • New York Daily News
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Over all, the humor has been sanitized a bit compared with the darker, more grotesque comedy of the French original.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    Mr. Davis has a lot of ideas, but when it comes to dramatizing them, he is unable to give them an engaging form.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Dave Kehr
    The pretty-pretty visual style is evidence of a close study of Days of Heaven, as well as a complete misunderstanding of it. With Leo McKern and William Daniels; photographed by Nestor Almendros, forced into garish effects far below the level of his talent.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Ambassador Gregory Peck finds that he's adopted the Antichrist (and he's a cute little feller too), in the slickest of the many demonic thrillers that followed in the wake of The Exorcist. Richard Donner directs more for speed than mood, but there are a few good shocks.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    American audiences will probably find it familiar and insufficiently cathartic.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Kehr
    Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 masterpiece blends a brutal manipulation of audience identification and an incredibly dense, allusive visual style to create the most morally unsettling film ever made. The case for Hitchcock as a modern Conrad rests on this ruthless investigation of the heart of darkness, but the film is uniquely Hitchcockian in its positioning of the godlike mother figure. It's a deeply serious and deeply disturbing work, but Hitchcock, with his characteristic perversity, insisted on telling interviewers that it was a "fun" picture.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Kehr
    Leone brought back a masterpiece, a film that expands his baroque, cartoonish style into genuine grandeur, weaving dozens of thematic variations and narrative arabesques around a classical western foundation myth.(Review of Original Release)
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    The results, to judge from the examples here, have been stuffy and disappointing, an unholy alliance between Playboy Channel prurience and PBS cultural alibis.
    • 9 Metascore
    • 12 Dave Kehr
    Self-conscious camp, the lowest artistic category known to man.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    A rueful, reflective companion piece to "Born to Lose."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Kehr
    What's oddly appealing about this film is the sweetness that the director, François Velle, manages to extract from Craig Sherman's rather bitter screenplay.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The first two are total stinkers, but things pick up with Joe Dante's creepy, claustrophobic, and very funny study of a brattish kid who lives in a cartoon universe, and come slamming home with George Miller's final sketch about a paranoid airline passenger.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The animation is competent, and some of the gags are quite funny, but Jonah never shakes the oppressive, morally superior good-for-you quality that almost automatically accompanies didactic entertainment.

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