For 553 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Kehr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Leopard (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Vulgar
Score distribution:
553 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Sustains the charm of an early 60's New York romance.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Veers between the light naturalism of American television and the pulsing melodrama of Bollywood entertainment.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Emerges as an engaging if occasionally hokey inspirational melodrama about the importance of community in the face of life's disappointments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    By and large Mr. Hoch's portrayals are as harsh and authentic as a police photograph, but an occasional touch of sentimentality creeps in.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    This is a bumpy ride, but one worth taking.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Handsome, well-executed film that nonetheless feels a bit long at 111 minutes. Those who are already anime fans will certainly find it stimulating; but this may not be the one to convert the uninitiated.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Mr. Sawyer eventually overreaches, striving for tragedy with a grim, cautionary ending that seems meant to evoke "Frankenstein." But the film's offhand, homemade quality sustains a quirky appeal.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The resulting compromise does not produce a perfect film, but it is a fine record of a classic production and an important reminder of an event that has not stopped echoing in American culture.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    As broad and cartoonish as the screenplay is, there is an accuracy of observation in the work of the director, Frank Novak, that keeps the film grounded in an undeniable social realism.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Has the bad luck to come on the heels of Kathryn Bigelow's beautifully made and politically impassioned "K-19," making this submarine picture -- a relatively modest, low-budget affair -- seem skimpy by comparison.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Entertaining, lightly mocking documentary.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The material continues to carry its inherent emotional power and moral importance. As banal as the telling may be -- and at times, All My Loved Ones more than flirts with kitsch -- the tale commands attention.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Emerges as an uncommonly sober, well-researched film of its type.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    She (Baur) has clearly earned the trust and respect of her subjects, the first qualification for any responsible documentarist, and they have repaid her with an intimate glimpse into their singular lives.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    As soon as the medallion appears, so do the digital maneuverings -- speeded-up movement, composite images, objects and people morphing into supernatural thingamajigs -- that undercut the genuine thrills of the genuine action.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Clearly understands its target audience of first-generation Indian-Americans and has its pleasures to provide.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The essential humanity of the characters shines through, giving face and form to a subculture the movies have largely neglected.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Here is one performer (Testud) whose features -- small sad eyes, sharp nose, wide rueful smile -- can sustain a feature by themselves.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The filmmakers build an argument that is both intellectual and emotional, concentrating as much on the forensic evidence as on Ms. Rosario's passionate commitment to finding justice for her son.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    An amiable, offhanded comedy about ethnic identity and last-chance romance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Ms. Gardos is not a particularly flavorful filmmaker, but she is an honest one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Mr. Burger has a performer who can dart between stentorian self-assurance and cringing pathos, maintaining his character's ambiguity until the final sequence of this resourceful and ingenious entertainment.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Typical Nilsson mix of the audacious and the cringe-inducing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The film's mechanical workings are still impressive, but between the unsympathetic characters and the coldly precise direction, there is little here for an audience to clutch to its heart.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    A competent, unpretentious entertainment destined to fill the after-school slot at shopping mall theaters across the country.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Not quite good enough to jump out of the pack of Asian swordplay movies but is too well crafted to sink into utter anonymity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Has the sense of gritty, practical politics of a Japanese samurai epic combined with the high-flying stunt work and magical special effects of a Hong Kong romp. Ultimately this film by Yojiro Takita is satisfying on neither level, but not for lack of trying.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The film is at once a sort of Indian "Stella Dallas," which finds the heroine making sacrifice after sacrifice on behalf of her family, and a "Gone With the Wind"-style epic of social change.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    An enjoyable, noisy romp.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Most impressive, and the only segment that dares to criticize the terrorists directly, is Mr. Imamura's contribution, the last part of the film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Minnelli's comedy had its serious underpinnings: by the end of the film, a girl had become a woman. By the end of Ms. Gordon's film, the girl is still a girl, but a girl with much cooler stuff, including a stately home, a butler and a cute British boyfriend.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Its luxuriant, nearly three-hour running time allows lots of room for spectacular musical numbers and dramatic climaxes that are extended to the breaking point and beyond.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    AKA
    His (Roy's) informed contempt is highly entertaining, but he neglects some of the more problematical and perhaps more illuminating aspects of his story.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Unfortunately, its inescapable comparison is to David Gordon Green's "George Washington," made the same year as Mr. Davidson's film but with a far greater sense of style and a more profound grasp of the fragility of young lives. Way Past Cool can't stand up to that kind of competition.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Joins the small pool of films that have dared to use Imax to tell a story.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    This is compelling stuff, but there is something deeply distracting in the use of recreated material.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Those seeking a serious sociological examination of the role of stock car racing in late capitalist America will probably want to search elsewhere, but audiences looking for a kick will find one -- almost literally -- in Mr. Wincer's work.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Though the film is far from polished, the force of its significance to Mr. Frey, as well as the urgency of its political message, give it some genuine impact.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Walking Tall has no more fat on it than the Rock himself, a hulking yet curiously ingratiating presence who seems the most likely candidate to replace Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as America's favorite living comic book character.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    A strange, disturbing and yet occasionally quite funny cultural artifact from the new Russia.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Depending on your choice, the film is either an unpleasantly masochistic fantasy or an unpleasantly sadistic one.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Good-natured, mildly appealing video feature.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    It is a sincere, thoughtful work, though not a very accomplished one.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Informal, pleasant film that ably captures Mr. Traoré's spirit.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Bright, good-spirited and blissfully short.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Far more ambivalent and ambiguous film than Mr. Spielberg's. Both North and South are portrayed as brutal, abusive regimes that use their citizens as so much cannon fodder.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The film has no qualities beyond its formal polish--and its careful avoidance (or rather, displacement) of the moral and political issues involved can seem too crafty, too convenient.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    A generally effective sex comedy, distinguished by its origins (Brazil) and the considerable appeal of its star, Sonia Braga. (Review of original release)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The script is funny and observant, full of shocks of recognition, but for all his progress as a writer, Allen's direction remains disconcertingly amateurish. Still, it remains perhaps the only film in which Allen has been able to successfully imagine a personality other than his own.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    One of the most technically proficient of David Cronenberg's early gnawing, Canadian-made horror movies, though it lacks both the logic and the queasy sexual subtext that made his still earlier work - "Rabid," "They Came From Within" - so memorably revolting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    This 1985 western does a decent job of developing some dry 80s humor without completely undermining the genre, yet Kasdan's considerable skills as a plot carpenter seem to desert him as soon as the story moves to the town of the title--the action turns choppy, confused, and arbitrary.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    There are several solid laughs and some excellent supporting performances. But this is a film to be wary of.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The film doesn't transcend its genre, but it's an honorable achievement within it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Wyler lays out all the elements with care and precision, but the romantic comedy never comes together - it's charm by computer. [Review of re-release]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    This story of a party girl (Audrey Hepburn) in love with a gigolo (George Peppard) allows Edwards to create a very handsome film, with impeccable Technicolor photography by Franz Planer. [Review of re-release]
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The dual point of view is used effectively, though it's less valid as social criticism (where Penn's observations tend toward facile revisionism) than as an index of the uncertainty that characterizes most of Penn's heroes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    It's bleak, creepy, and occasionally terrifying. Studio pressure apparently forced Murch to back off from the full fury of his conception, but this is still strong stuff.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The first two are total stinkers, but things pick up with Joe Dante's creepy, claustrophobic, and very funny study of a brattish kid who lives in a cartoon universe, and come slamming home with George Miller's final sketch about a paranoid airline passenger.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Richard Attenborough's direction achieves that balance of impersonality and brisk pacing we've come to recognize as "professionalism," and he doesn't clog up the dancing with too many stylistic gimmicks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A few moments of sly inspiration are not enough to carry an entire feature; along with the tears, it leaves behind an aftertaste of phoniness. [16 March 1990, Friday, p.H]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It is an intriguing subject, though so far all that Morris has brought to it is a combination of the morbid and the cruel; he needs to develop some sympathy, too. [16 Sept 1988]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It's meant to be open, heartwarming and real, but beneath its often attractively performed surface, the clichés are grinding as heavily as in any ''Rambo'' picture [21 Oct 1988]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    McTiernan, regrettably, seems more interested in spectacle than suspense, and the attack sequences are filmed for splashy visual impact. And an apocalyptic finale that raises the antiwar message to the nuclear level is more than McTiernan's metaphor can bear. [12 June 1987, Friday, p.J]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Emerges as cutty, indistinct and confused, full of shots that don't match and spatial conceptions that would look flat even on TV. The more Branagh strains to appear “cinematic,'' the more he looks like a man of the theater. [23 Aug 1991, Friday, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Boys N the Hood wants to be “The Learning Tree'' and “Super Fly'' at once, an ambition that doesn't seem quite honest. [12 July 1991]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    An idealized, dreamy fantasy of life in the business world-harmless as airplane reading, a bit dull on the big screen. [2 Mar 1990, Friday, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It's Mary Stuart Masterson, bringing a depth and tenacity to her role that nowhere appears in the screenplay, who leaves the lasting impression. She escapes the airiness of Hughes's vision to establish something like a human being. [22 Feb 1987]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The details of this Twin Peaks are slight and repetitious, and their meanings are numbingly obvious. Behind small town America's facade of sweetness and light, there exist darkness and evil-news that is a day late and about $7.50 short. [28 Aug 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    An air of embarrassing familiarity hangs over the entire project, as if it were a story told by an aging relative not quite aware of how many times, and how much better, he has been over the same material before. [25 Dec 1990, Tempo, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Though the costumes are beautifully designed, the chateau locations carefully chosen and the dialogue full of curling locutions, something cloddish and naive still comes through in Frears' direction, and not only because he can seldom get his shots to match. [13 Jan 1989, Friday, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Depardieu has so much life on screen, so much bounding energy and insistent physicality, that he almost brings it off.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Paul Verhoeven's RoboCop is a stylish piece of work that leaves a sour aftertaste. [17 Jul 1987]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Kuzui has imposed a heavily block-lettered feminist message on the movie, suggesting that Buffy discovers her empowerment as a woman by driving huge, phallic stakes through the hearts of her enemies. In this case, having it all means being feminine and bloodthirsty, too. [31 Jul 1992, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    If the film's diffidence is its greatest charm, it is also, in the end, its greatest limitation-it's a movie that seems afraid to declare itself, to make the big move that might propel it from the pleasant to the memorable. [03 Aug 1990]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Trust seems ultimately a matter of touches-some cute, some surprising, some even fairly expressive, but none more than superficial. [16 Aug 1991]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Class Action occupies itself with long passages of family melodrama, most of it as familiar as the courtroom drama but far less entertaining. [15 Mar 1991]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Hysteria, however skillfully maintained, should never be mistaken for art-a caution that applies equally to Stone and his subject. [01 Mar 1991]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It has a few good laughs in it thanks to Murphy, but mainly depends for its appeal on an uncomfortable manipulation of racial stereotypes. [04 Dec 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The film is finally impersonal, almost anonymous; it's a chilly, lumbering project that carries little of the mark of lived experience. [25 Dec 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    for all its flaws, Born on the Fourth of July provides the final proof that Tom Cruise is the real thing-a movie star with all the natural, unforced ability to connect with an audience that the title implies. [20 Dec 1989, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    If Zeffirelli's Hamlet does resemble an actual movie at several points, it's thanks almost entirely to the inventive and atmospheric lighting of veteran cinematographer David Watkin, whose somber, gray-green palette gives the film a dignity and substance it would otherwise lack. [18 Jan 1991]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Awakenings is a film that unquestionably succeeds on its own terms, though those terms are deeply suspect. It is a canny piece of false art, one that consistently swaps meaning for superficial effect. [20 Dec 1990, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A character comedy requires some notion of respect and integrity. Dirty Rotten Scoundrels has none. [14 Dec 1988, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Billy's burning, self-destructive energy is about all Young Guns has going for it-the suicidal kicks James Dean found in chickie races are here transposed to six-gun shoot-outs, filmed in a slow-motion process that strives vainly to evoke Sam Peckinpah. [12 Aug 1988, p.H]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The film gets by on the sheer good-naturedness Reitman is able to place in all of his efforts, though it doesn't seem likely to inspire the same level of affection as the original. Innocence is one quality that can never quite be recaptured. [16 Jun 1989, p.28]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The film is sober, serious-minded and paced like a funeral march. [11 Dec 1987]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    As much as the film may try to peddle warmth and solidarity, it remains disturbingly cold and impersonal, limited by the formulaic writing of Bob Tzudiker and Noni White and stymied by Ortega's apparent distance from his cast. [10 Apr 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    There is a genuine sweetness in Reitman's work that balances the innate cruelty of much '80s film comedy. But this time the gags are too feeble to provide a counterweight and the film tips into the cute, benign and pointless. [9 Dec 1988, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A River Runs Through It emerges as hopelessly middle-brow-the kind of diluted, prettified art traditionally associated with PBS and the Academy Awards. [09 Oct 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Schumacher's work in The Lost Boys consists of turning undertones into overtones--of taking the latent, the implied and the mysterious, and turning them into the loud and the obvious. He takes a story and turns it into a bunch of scenes, each of which contains its own payoff and none of which seems to draw on what has come before. And in these days of concept films, a story is a terrible thing to waste. [31 Jul 1987, p.D]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A movie that must spend most of its running time explaining its hopelessly complicated premises, which leaves very little room for anything much to happen. [22 Nov 1989, p.C1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Steven Soderbergh's Kafka is a surprisingly cold, gray and flavorless follow-up to "sex, lies and videotape." [7 Feb. 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Like the massive shipboard set that is its centerpiece, the film is huge and impressive - though, again like the captain's imposing vessel, it stubbornly and disappointingly remains at anchor. Hook never sets sail.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The film is actually fairly well made, with a brisk tempo pace, a professional look and enough competently staged action.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Dugan can`t find a tone that allows him to preserve the shock of the gags while minimalizing their physical painfulness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Alien Nation is a sluggish, forced and hopelessly derivative action thriller, sporadically redeemed by the wit of its stars and the velvety sheen of Greenberg's night photography.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Shyer's direction of actors rises instantly to a level of cartoonish hysteria and descends only for occasional wet bursts of sentimentality. But as an exercise in ideological persuasion it works appallingly well, playing on deep-seated guilts and insecurities with a sureness of touch that may make it a hit with the audience it caricatures.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It isn't hard to take, but Harry and the Hendersons seems a bit familiar.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Penny Marshall, the sitcom actress ("Laverne and Shirley") turned filmmaker ("Big," "Awakenings"), manages to make even such elementary material seem labored and phony. The film, which was shot in and around Chicago last summer, is a major disappointment.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    This aggressively "sincere" movie is without a single authentically lived moment a sense exaggerated by Brian Tufano's overcomposed cinematography, which imitates the glossy hollowness of fashion photographs. [24Oct1997 Pg 51]
    • New York Daily News

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