For 552 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Kehr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Unforgiven
Lowest review score: 0 The Price of Air
Score distribution:
552 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Travels fast and straight down a linear plot, and the ceaseless rush quickly becomes monotonous.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    A very bad film--snide, barely competent, and overdrawn--that enjoys a perennial popularity, perhaps because its confused moral position appeals to the secret Nietzscheans within us.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Sluggish, repetitive, and strangely timorous, with little of the zap and imagination of the Pythons' television work.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Woody Allen's naive notions of art--he thinks it means a story with a moral--might have some primitive charm if he didn't put them forward so self-importantly.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    A limp, cheaply made version of the Broadway. Director Randal Kleiser shows no real sense of how a musical is constructed: the songs are bunched together, the production numbers don't move, and the whole project shifts awkwardly between naturalism and stylization.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    The picture is completely devoid of cinematic interest, adopting instead a tiresome theatrical aesthetic in which showy monologues are filmed in interminable, usually ill-chosen long takes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Director John Landis is so deficient in basic storytelling skills that he must spend hours explicating the most elementary plot points while and Murphy are sidelined.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    Brian De Palma dedicates this 1983 feature to Howard Hawks and Ben Hecht, authors of the 1932 original, though I doubt they would find much honor in his gory inflation of their crisp, 90-minute comic nightmare into a klumbering, self-important, arrhythmic downer of nearly three hours.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 25 Dave Kehr
    Vincent & Theo is a by-the-numbers art biography that barely succeeds in recapping the best-known events in the life of its subject, Vincent van Gogh. There is something almost chilling in the degree of the director's evident disengagement from his material and the complete lack of craft with which he has filmed it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    The action is clotted and murky, and Coppola obviously hasn't bothered to clarify it for the members of his cast, who wander through the film with expressions of winsome, honest befuddlement.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Kubrick is after a cool, sunlit vision of hell, born in the bosom of the nuclear family, but his imagery--with its compulsive symmetry and brightness--is too banal to sustain interest, while the incredibly slack narrative line forestalls suspense.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    It's a failure, less because the odd stylistic mix doesn't take (it does from time to time, and to striking effect) than because Landis hasn't bothered to put his story into any kind of satisfying shape.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    The usual Spielberg rhetoric about the sanctity of childhood and the beauty of dreams seems wholly factitious in this crass context, which even includes a commercial--in the form of a rock video--for the tie-in merchandise.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    You get the plot, all right, but that's all you get - no body, no texture, no rhythm, no shading.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    The picture is a bland procession of loosely framed close-ups, which serve only to underline the amateurish performances.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    The wit is too weak to sustain a film, and the songs all sound the same.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    George Roy Hill's 1969 film moves with steady, stupid grace from oozy sentimentality to nihilistic violence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    What's left is a curiously disconnected illustration of American racism, which nevertheless fails to realize the power and irony inherent in its pop-Marxist analysis.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Hughes invokes the classical unities of time, place, and plot symmetry, yet he trashes his careful structure every time he needs a gag - destroying the integrity of his characters, shattering the plausibility of his situations.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Though we are largely spared Leonard Nimoy's stentorian presence as a performer, we must endure his miscalculations as a director: the dialogue scenes are often hilariously turgid; the action scenes—when Nimoy can be bothered to descend from his podium and film them—are zanily maladroit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Only adds to the sense that Mr. Konchalovsky has lost his artistic moorings. He has certainly lost his common sense.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    There is hardly any point in discussing the direction of a picture like this, in which almost every shot has been predetermined by the requirements of the special effects, yet director Richard Marquand fluffs the two or three real opportunities he has, rendering the long-delayed character climaxes with a chilly indifference.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Dave Kehr
    It sounds like standard Cinderella stuff (and the script comes complete with plenty of allusions to princesses in towers), but it's played here with an emphasis on possessions and possessing that borders on the obscene… It's a pretty ugly movie. [23 Mar 1990, Friday, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Less a formal documentary than a rambling screed.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Loses its way in rhetorical excess and blatant sentimentality.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Dave Kehr
    Theory of Flight follows the standard inspirational formula. [23 Dec. 1998, p.43]
    • New York Daily News
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Mr. Cattaneo restricts himself to the smiling blandness that has become the stock in trade of British comedies made for export, turning in a film that is forced, familiar and thoroughly condescending.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    This 1979 movie adaptation of the cult TV series is blandness raised to an epic scale. Robert Wise's bloodless direction drains all the air from the Enterprise.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Robert Altman's busy, detailed mise-en-scene, flattened cartoon-style through space-compacting long lenses, does capture some of the frenetic atmosphere of the Fleischer cartoons, but it tends to crowd out, and neutralize, the story values.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Dave Kehr
    Tricked up with an elaborate flashback structure, subtitled dialogue in three languages and as many gratuitous aesthetic touches as the traffic will bear, Proteus emerges as a heavy, pretentious and derivative film.