For 561 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Kehr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Badlands
Lowest review score: 0 Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2
Score distribution:
561 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    An idealized, dreamy fantasy of life in the business world-harmless as airplane reading, a bit dull on the big screen. [2 Mar 1990, Friday, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    for all its flaws, Born on the Fourth of July provides the final proof that Tom Cruise is the real thing-a movie star with all the natural, unforced ability to connect with an audience that the title implies. [20 Dec 1989, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A movie that must spend most of its running time explaining its hopelessly complicated premises, which leaves very little room for anything much to happen. [22 Nov 1989, p.C1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A few moments of sly inspiration are not enough to carry an entire feature; along with the tears, it leaves behind an aftertaste of phoniness. [16 March 1990, Friday, p.H]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The material is disparate and wide ranging, and it is often difficult to follow Mr. Friedman and Mr. Nadler down all the side streets and back alleys of their investigation.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Emerges as cutty, indistinct and confused, full of shots that don't match and spatial conceptions that would look flat even on TV. The more Branagh strains to appear “cinematic,'' the more he looks like a man of the theater. [23 Aug 1991, Friday, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Bland but harmless.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Mr. Brugge has perhaps succeeded in avoiding vulgar melodrama, but he has hit on something far worse -- a bloodless melodrama, with bottled water running in its veins.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    You don't have to be a horror-movie scholar to know that nothing significant is going to happen in any movie with "2" in the title; the creature has to stay around long enough at least to complete a trilogy and fill out a nice boxed set of DVD's.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The details of this Twin Peaks are slight and repetitious, and their meanings are numbingly obvious. Behind small town America's facade of sweetness and light, there exist darkness and evil-news that is a day late and about $7.50 short. [28 Aug 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A sturdy, well-made piece that never quite overcomes its structural flaws.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    McTiernan, regrettably, seems more interested in spectacle than suspense, and the attack sequences are filmed for splashy visual impact. And an apocalyptic finale that raises the antiwar message to the nuclear level is more than McTiernan's metaphor can bear. [12 June 1987, Friday, p.J]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Kuzui has imposed a heavily block-lettered feminist message on the movie, suggesting that Buffy discovers her empowerment as a woman by driving huge, phallic stakes through the hearts of her enemies. In this case, having it all means being feminine and bloodthirsty, too. [31 Jul 1992, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It's Mary Stuart Masterson, bringing a depth and tenacity to her role that nowhere appears in the screenplay, who leaves the lasting impression. She escapes the airiness of Hughes's vision to establish something like a human being. [22 Feb 1987]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Fitfully entertaining molehill of a movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Keeps building to apocalyptic climaxes that never materialize. (Review of Original Release)
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    If nothing else, Space Station 3-D is a film that agoraphobics and claustrophobics can agree on. Members of both groups should stay home.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It isn't hard to take, but Harry and the Hendersons seems a bit familiar.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It doesn't come off, despite a dazzling color design and imaginative sets, perhaps because Demy's extremely rarefied talent for fantasy needs to be anchored by a touch of the real.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Graham Greene's screenplay is centered on the pivotal moment when a child first discovers sin, but the boy's perspective is neglected in favor of facile suspense structures and a thuddingly conventional whodunit finale.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A mildly engaging addition to that curious sub-genre of American independent filmmaking, the whimsical comedy of Long Island alienation.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Despite a monotonously fashionable mise-en-scene, Lyne generates some genuine erotic tension between his two stars; you believe in their obsessive relationship, even as most of the action and staging registers as ridiculous.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Represents something new under the sun: sincere camp.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Depardieu has so much life on screen, so much bounding energy and insistent physicality, that he almost brings it off.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    With its emphasis on global positioning devices, Jet Skis and computer-designed surfboards, Mr. Boston's film is very much concerned with the stuff and very little with the spirit of professional surfing as practiced today.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    If Zeffirelli's Hamlet does resemble an actual movie at several points, it's thanks almost entirely to the inventive and atmospheric lighting of veteran cinematographer David Watkin, whose somber, gray-green palette gives the film a dignity and substance it would otherwise lack. [18 Jan 1991]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Makes compelling viewing. But it is viewing of an eerily familiar kind, almost as if the real-life lawyers in the film had patterned themselves on television archetypes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Penny Marshall, the sitcom actress ("Laverne and Shirley") turned filmmaker ("Big," "Awakenings"), manages to make even such elementary material seem labored and phony. The film, which was shot in and around Chicago last summer, is a major disappointment.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    The director, Peter Berg ("Very Bad Things"), keeps the predictable story line on course without developing a truly compelling momentum in the action sequences or finding anything fresh in the interaction of the stock characters.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    One hundred forty-nine minutes of pure, unadulterated culture.

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