For 700 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Kehr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Psycho
Lowest review score: 0 Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2
Score distribution:
700 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    The film is still an entertaining and invigorating thriller, with a structure and some curious sexual overtones that suggest Howard Hawks's "A Girl in Every Port."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Mario Van Peebles, of course, inhabits a very different world from that of his father: a world that his father, in some small way, helped to create. It is his awareness of this paradox, of the progressive import of his father's film and of the repressive import of his father's personality, that informs this modest but interesting work.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    This 1983 feature was Carpenter's best film since Halloween but still couldn't recapture the perfect balance of visceral shock and narrative integrity that defined his first success.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Ms. Chaiken isn't much interested in melodramatic plot developments. Her talent lies in an evocative, accurate observation of a distinctive milieu and in the lively, convincing dialogue she creates for her characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Carpenter creates a vision of the technological future that is both disillusioned and oddly affirmative in its insistence on the unscientific survival of emotional frailty.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    The musical sequences are good enough that they make you wish Ross had been willing to leave the surface realism behind and break out into the high stylization and exuberance of the genre's classic days. Despite the hesitations, it's miles above "Flashdance" in technique and intelligence.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Peter Weir, the standard-bearer of the Australian Tradition of Quality, is on hand to smother all the contrivances in his solemn, academic style, and the result is a moderately effective, highly affected thriller.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Functions best in its voyeuristic, sociological mode, offering fragmentary glimpses of complicated lives and the complicated social rituals that shape them.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    The film was hugely successful and widely praised in its time, though it's really nothing more than the old C.B. De Mille formula of titillation and moralizing--Roman orgies and Christian martyrs--with only a fraction of De Mille's showmanship.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    While the low comedy is undeniably effective, the film leaves behind a bad taste of snobbery and petty meanness.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    This stuff is much too strange and much too disturbing to be invented.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    It is an endearing, likable film, though its benign surface may cover some subtle propaganda on behalf of China's centralized government.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Less consumed by behavioral details than many of his filmmaking compatriots, Mr. Rasoulof makes bold use of symbolic imagery - a satellite television is confiscated and tossed overboard - suggesting that utopias inevitably come at the price of isolation and authoritarianism.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Though 30 Years to Life doesn't break any new ground, it's a light, engaging, well-carpentered film, with a quick wit and a sense of character just deep enough to lend some weight to the laugh lines.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Has an edge of cynicism and cruelty that just as often suggests the spaghetti westerns of Sergio Leone.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    A product neither of Hollywood nor the New York-Sundance indie axis, Manna From Heaven is a true outsider film, and while it would be easy to fault its lack of technical polish, somewhat discursive script and uneven performances, it is also refreshingly sincere, gentle and good-natured.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    An unusually successful attempt to mate good drama with political analysis.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    A rueful, reflective companion piece to "Born to Lose."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Highly irritating at first, Mr. Koury's passive technique eventually begins to yield some interesting results.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    There is no denying the force of Mr. Brisseau's bizarre imagination and the personal conviction he brings to it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Desplechin's film sustains its running time by continually revealing new aspects to its characters that reverse our initial judgments.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Mr. Ratnam is a dynamic, natural filmmaker who happily uses every device at his disposal, from rapid-fire MTV editing to sped-up action scenes that recall silent serials, to keep his lengthy film moving at a brisk pace. The film flags only when Mr. Ratnam must turn his attention to the soggy romantic subplots.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    The screenplay tends to constrain rather than liberate Hitchcock's thematic thrust, but there is much of technical value in his geometric survey of the scene and the elaborate strategies employed to transfer audience sympathy among the four main characters. (review of original release)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Whether or not you buy Mr. Broomfield's findings, the film acquires an undeniable entertainment value as the slight, pale Mr. Broomfield continues to force himself on people and into situations that would make lesser men run for cover.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    After a summer of computer-generated blockbusters, the amiably low-tech Benji: Off the Leash! seems like a breath of fresh air.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Polished, well-structured film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    The freer and more sophisticated approach of "Divine Intervention" makes these traditional-minded documentaries look somewhat stodgy and old-fashioned by comparison, but both have a value as reportage that Mr. Suleiman's film does not pretend to have.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    The film is funny in a way few of these toothless exercises are. The gags aren't exactly clever, but there are a lot of them, and the cutting finds a fast, effective tempo. Joe Biroc's witty cinematography gives the picture an authentically flat, artificial Universal look, and Lloyd Bridges, Peter Graves, Leslie Nielsen, and Robert Stack are around for added iconographical persuasiveness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    It is a funny picture—not too consistently, and certainly not too coherently, but when it hits, it hits.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 70 Dave Kehr
    Visually and structurally it's a mess, but many of the situations are genuinely clever, and there are plenty of memorable gags. The perpetual problem is that Allen isn't nearly the thinker he thinks he is.

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