For 700 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Kehr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Singin' in the Rain
Lowest review score: 0 Cupid's Mistake
Score distribution:
700 movie reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    As LaMotta, Robert De Niro gives a blank, soulless performance; there's so little of depth or urgency coming from him that he's impossible to despise, or forgive, in any but the most superficial way.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Graham Greene's screenplay is centered on the pivotal moment when a child first discovers sin, but the boy's perspective is neglected in favor of facile suspense structures and a thuddingly conventional whodunit finale.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    The film looks austere and serious, rather as if it had been shot inside a Frigidaire, and the oppressiveness of the images tends to strangle laughter, even at the most absurd excesses of Alvin Sargent's script.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    There are several solid laughs and some excellent supporting performances. But this is a film to be wary of.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    Steven Spielberg's mechanical thriller is guaranteed to make you scream on schedule (John Williams's score even has the audience reactions programmed into the melodies), particularly if your tolerance for weak motivation and other minor inconsistencies is high.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The film has no qualities beyond its formal polish--and its careful avoidance (or rather, displacement) of the moral and political issues involved can seem too crafty, too convenient.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    Brian De Palma demonstrates the drawbacks of a film-school education by overexploiting every cornball trick of style in the book: slow motion, split screen long takes, and soft focus abound, all to no real point...He's an overachiever—which might not make for good movies, but at least he's seldom dull.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Steve McQueen as a tres chic San Francisco cop, though the real star is his sports car. There isn't much here, and what there is is awfully easy. With Jacqueline Bisset, Robert Vaughn, Robert Duvall, and a chase sequence that achieved classic status mainly by going on too long; Peter Yates directed this 1968 feature.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The script is funny and observant, full of shocks of recognition, but for all his progress as a writer, Allen's direction remains disconcertingly amateurish. Still, it remains perhaps the only film in which Allen has been able to successfully imagine a personality other than his own.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    This is compelling stuff, but there is something deeply distracting in the use of recreated material.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    This sort of thing was considered high art not so long ago; now it seems forced and ponderously symbolic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    Mainly it's marking time: the characters take a definite backseat to the special effects, and much of the action seems gratuitous, leading nowhere.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A few moments of sly inspiration are not enough to carry an entire feature; along with the tears, it leaves behind an aftertaste of phoniness. [16 March 1990, Friday, p.H]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    The acting, showy and instinctual, is most of the movie; the visual style is too forced and chicly distended to let the drama acquire much natural life of its own. It's a film that expresses a great deal of disgust toward homosexuals, while placing a sympathetic homosexual relationship at its core.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    It is an intriguing subject, though so far all that Morris has brought to it is a combination of the morbid and the cruel; he needs to develop some sympathy, too. [16 Sept 1988]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    The dual-track plot, with constant cutting between mother and daughter, seems less an attempt to establish meaningful parallels between the two stories than the nervous twitches of a compulsive channel changer.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Despite its blatant mediocrity, this 1981 British film knocked 'em dead everywhere, which makes me suspect that audiences weren't responding to the film itself as much as to the attitudes that underlie it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Zuniga's support is winningly low-key.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Boys N the Hood wants to be “The Learning Tree'' and “Super Fly'' at once, an ambition that doesn't seem quite honest. [12 July 1991]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Wyler lays out all the elements with care and precision, but the romantic comedy never comes together - it's charm by computer. [Review of re-release]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    The movie is never less than entertaining, but it fails to satisfy—it gives us too little of too much. Oddly, much of its pleasure is in the acting, which up to this point hadn't been Carpenter's strong suit: Donald Pleasence, Adrienne Barbeau, and Harry Dean Stanton offer excellent turns.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    This story of a party girl (Audrey Hepburn) in love with a gigolo (George Peppard) allows Edwards to create a very handsome film, with impeccable Technicolor photography by Franz Planer. [Review of re-release]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    for all its flaws, Born on the Fourth of July provides the final proof that Tom Cruise is the real thing-a movie star with all the natural, unforced ability to connect with an audience that the title implies. [20 Dec 1989, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    A very minor contribution to the great corpus of Iranian cinema that has emerged in the last 20 years.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Kehr
    Dunye's salvation is her sense of humor. She's good at creating light, bantering dialogue, and there are a couple of sharp, satirical scenes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Awakenings is a film that unquestionably succeeds on its own terms, though those terms are deeply suspect. It is a canny piece of false art, one that consistently swaps meaning for superficial effect. [20 Dec 1990, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Though the costumes are beautifully designed, the chateau locations carefully chosen and the dialogue full of curling locutions, something cloddish and naive still comes through in Frears' direction, and not only because he can seldom get his shots to match. [13 Jan 1989, Friday, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Billy Wilder's 1954 version of the Samuel Taylor staple was a perfect vehicle for Audrey Hepburn, though the cut is too tight for her costars, Humphrey Bogart and William Holden. [Review of re-release]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Kehr
    There is surprisingly little emotional amplitude in the film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Dave Kehr
    Dull it is not, but Wong's trademark sense of romantic melancholy fails to jell amid all the excess, and the film turns frankly silly once the mute starts imagining himself in love with a can of sardines. [21 Jan 1998, Pg.37]
    • New York Daily News

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