For 623 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Denby's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Class
Lowest review score: 10 Arthur
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 623
623 movie reviews
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    The only thing that Butler and Aniston have in common, however, is identical Aruba-bronze skin tones: they seem to have been sprayed with the same can.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    We don’t ask for much from this kind of movie, but Knight and Day tramples on our desire for just enough plausibility to release the fun. It makes us feel like fools for wanting to be entertained by froth.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    The movie collapses into banality. The marriages hang together, but fear and guilt provide the glue. Perhaps the biggest insult to women here is the idea that they can't get better men than these two vacuous guys. [14 March 2011, p. 78]
    • The New Yorker
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    The movie is all whoosh and whack and abrupt closeups -- jerky digital punctuation. It's alienating experience, without emotional resonance or charm. [28 March 2011, p. 116]
    • The New Yorker
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    The result is an evasive, baffling, unexciting production - anything but a classic.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    If the rest of the movie had been on Travolta's level of sly knowingness, it might have been a hip classic, rather than what it is -- a summertime debauch. [23 July 2012, p. 81]
    • The New Yorker
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    A clear failure, yet Lee is getting at things that mystify him, and I was touched by parts of the movie. [13 & 20 Aug. 2012, p.97]
    • The New Yorker
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    At the center of the movie, in place of the ardent, emotionally pulverizing Judy Garland, there is James Franco...as he smirks and winks, his reflexive self-deprecation comes off as a gutless kind of cool, and it sinks this odd, fretful, uncertain movie like a boulder. [18 March 2013, p.86]
    • The New Yorker
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 David Denby
    The movie is like a monstrous balloon that keeps re-inflating. If Salinger were around, he would reach for a pin.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    Full Frontal is the sort of arbitrary mess that gives experimentation a bad name. The news that the movie was shot on digital video and film in eighteen days, and that the actors drove themselves to the set and applied their own makeup, would have made a nice Sunday Times story if the movie were any good. But it isn't. [5 August 2002, p. 80]
    • The New Yorker
    • 54 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    The disgraceful script is by Duncan Kennedy, Donna Powers, and Wayne Powers. Directed with occasional flashes of nasty wit by Renny Harlin.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    Painful to sit through, because you want to see someone like Paul Thomas Anderson take hold of the character and the actress and start again from the beginning. Bob Dolman understands Suzette, but the rest of the movie is composed of ham-handedly obvious scenes. [23 Sept 2002, p. 98]
    • The New Yorker
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    Carrey, unable to pretzel himself in this role, has to do a normal job of characterization, but he never fills in the blank spaces in Peter Appleton. [28 Jan 2002, p. 90]
    • The New Yorker
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    One of those hyper-articulate messes which inspire awe and a kind of nauseated pity. [3 March 2003, p. 94]
    • The New Yorker
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    This shameless piece of sentimentality is indignantly on the side of feelings and spontaneity and against coldhearted technique, as if those were the only two choices in training doctors.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    The self-confident fatuity and condescension of the movie is offensive.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    The Book of Eli combines the maximum in hollow piety with remorseless violence. [18 Jan. 2010, p.82]
    • The New Yorker
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    The plot becomes disastrously condescending: the black man, who's crude, sexy, and a great dancer, liberates the frozen white man. The handsome Omar Sy jumps all over the place, and he's blunt and grating. Francois Cluzet acts with his eyebrows, his nose, his forehead. It's an admirable performance, but the movie is an embarrassment. [28 May 2012, p.78]
    • The New Yorker
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 David Denby
    The story, devised by David Benioff and Skip Woods, is largely meaningless, and the emotions are no more than functional—they set up the next fight.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 10 David Denby
    The movie is exhausting, utterly without feeling, and pointless -- though Smith looks great in his Western outfit.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 10 David Denby
    In the end, Dreamcatcher is an abominable-worm picture. The movie is also an unholy mess, a miserably organized and redundant collection of arbitrary scares and thrills without a unifying visual or poetic idea. [31 March 2003, p. 106]
    • The New Yorker
    • 59 Metascore
    • 10 David Denby
    What Lars von Trier has achieved is avant-gardism for idiots. From beginning to end, Dogville is obtuse and dislikable, a whimsical joke wearing cement shoes. [29 March 2004, p. 103]
    • The New Yorker
    • 36 Metascore
    • 10 David Denby
    Has so many things wrong with it that one can only stare at the screen in disbelief. [25 April, 2011 p. 89]
    • The New Yorker

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