David Edelstein

Select another critic »
For 1,999 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Isle of Dogs
Lowest review score: 0 Arthur
Score distribution:
1999 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    First Reformed is rigorously austere (as befits the author of Transcendental Style in Film), but every frame suggests a longing for a world elsewhere. It could be argued that it gets away from Schrader, who probably had to wrest the script from his own hands to begin shooting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Solo: A Star Wars Story hits all its marks except the one it needed to hit most: accounting for one of pop culture’s most cantankerous charismatics.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    We’ve reached superhero saturation point, and Deadpool 2 is less a satire of that condition than a symptom of it. It has zero suspense — it’s too hip, too meta, for suspense.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Revenge inverts the gutbucket revenge genre without transcending it. That said, why should men have all the fun? The movie is like Ladies’ Night at a sleaze-o bar.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 20 David Edelstein
    What’s Terminal about? It’s about 90 minutes. That’s a cheap shot, but since the film doesn’t establish a baseline of reality, it’s hard to pick out a premise. It’s a series of playlets stitched together with the seams hanging out.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    RBG
    Both the film and the “notorious” figure at its center are the best imaginable retaliation to mansplaining.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Early in The Rachel Divide, a commentator describes Dolezal as a Rorschach blot, and the movie is one, too. Some people think it’s a hatchet job, others that it gives its subject’s commitment to social justice too much credence. I found it pretty much down the middle.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Despite a few scenes that are too on the nose, The Seagull... turns out to be very fine. Above all, it’s a platform for a handful of definitive performances.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    Cold Water has the kind of emotional purity that puts it in a class by itself. Its blue fog envelops you.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Disobedience isn’t packed with surprises, but that’s not why you go to a movie like this. You go to watch humans with wayward emotions labor to make peace with (or opt to war against) a formal, ritualized way of life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Flagrantly, bombastically extravagant, it plays its audience like a hundred million fiddles.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The title character in Tully, the third collaboration between director Jason Reitman and screenwriter Diablo Cody, doesn’t make her entrance until well into the film, after it’s established that the protagonist, Marlo (Charlize Theron), is moving from postpartum depression to postpartum desperation — and that’s when the movie enters uncharted territory and comes to life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    In Where Is Kyra?, Michelle Pfeiffer is stunning as a desperate, near-destitute woman whose life is shrouded in darkness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Blockers, for all its high-velocity raunch and drug abuse, is fundamentally positive.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The movie suffers from having no obvious endgame, and it’s not as fun as the recent, less tony shut-the-hell-up horror movie Don’t Breathe. But it’s aggressively scary.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The (elderly) Burt Reynolds vehicle The Last Movie Star strikes a note of banality in its first sequence from which it rarely deviates.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The performances could hardly be better — with the exception of O’Dowd, who’s good but maybe needed to find just one redeeming moment. (The writers could have helped.) As for Andie McDowell, I haven’t changed my thinking about her amateurish work in almost everything but "Sex, Lies, and Videotape," but I also see that with the right material her inward demeanor can be powerful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There’s not much wrong with the movie on its own terms. But there’s nothing great about it, either. It doesn’t have the breathless exuberance, the highs, of Spielberg’s best “escapist” work, maybe because everything is so filtered, so arm’s length.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Rush is a wonder. It takes bravery to convey closure, tunnel vision, total indifference to the camera that actors always know is there, however self-effacing they might want to be appear. Final Portrait is, like Rush’s performance, a miniature, but there’s a fullness to Tucci’s vision transcending every surface.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    It’s a series of moving paintings, tableaux vivants, a goofy dog comedy, a grim totalitarian allegory. It’s sui generis. It’s the damnedest thing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    In spite of the somewhat-cheesy climax, I came away admiring Unsane.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It muddles what might have been a fascinating alternate — i.e., downbeat — take on one of Israel’s most-acclaimed military operations.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The fights and chases are well designed. You can always tell where everything is in relation to everything else and who’s hitting or shooting whom — which isn’t a given, surprisingly, when fast cutting and loudness can cover a lot of infelicities.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Death Wish is a classier version of what you can find on cable in the wee hours — it’s not worth seeing in the theater — but it’s worth pausing over its politics of guns.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    A Wrinkle in Time, was strong enough to carry me through the film’s first, wobbly 15 minutes — but not a lot further.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    As in the most unnerving satires, the glibness adds to the horror. Even the most absurd deaths have a sting.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Mute is pretty meh but gets points for randomness.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Figuring out whether someone is a double, triple, or quadruple agent isn’t a brain-teaser, it’s a brain-irritant, especially when the script is so convoluted. The novel by Jason Matthews is cleaner, without so much jumping around between the two main characters.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Foxtrot feels unusually full for a film that seems to move in slow motion, in which the characters’ brains grind emptiness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Pellington and Perry can be accused of over-enunciating their ideas, but any film flooded with this level of emotion is worthy of our respect — and our tears.

Top Trailers