David Edelstein
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For 1,682 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 In the Bedroom
Lowest review score: 0 Funny Games (2008)
Score distribution:
1,682 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    An uncommonly well-crafted historical feminist tearjerker--both anti-patriarchal and a monument to motherhood.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Leigh has been giving actors their tongues for decades, and of all his films, Happy-Go-Lucky is the easiest, the least labored.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Philippe Claudel's direction is both probing and delicate, and Scott Thomas's face, even immobile, keeps you watching, searching for hints of her character's past, unable to blink for fear of missing something vital.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's a genuine genre vampire picture; and it's Swedish, winter-lit, Bergmanesque.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The result, however clichéd, is spectacularly unnerving: hair-trigger horror.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I Love You, Man is totally formulaic, but the formula is unnervingly (and hilariously) inside out.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Although Paltrow is radiant (and she nails the character’s ditzy sense of entitlement), it's Phoenix's movie. He is, once again, stupendous, and stupendous in a way he has never been before.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It is filmed with simplicity, a purity of intent, and I wanted to watch the faces of these men in their last seconds of life--not for the sake of history, but because of Wajda's imperative to put his father's death onscreen. He needed to do this. And somehow, sanity is restored.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    What makes the movie such an unexpectedly potent little number is that Adventureland comes to stand for Stagnationland; the real roller coaster (i.e., life) is just outside the park.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The film is, finally, a brilliant tap dance over a void: There’s no real drama when the inner life of the female lead is so shrouded, even if that’s the point.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    For all the artfulness, the feel of the film is rough-hewn, almost primitive. It’s a fabulous tree house of a movie.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    One job of memoir is to show the world through another's eyes and inspire you to live more alertly, and that is the glory of The Beaches of Agnès.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Lynn Shelton's marvelous chamber comedy Humpday butts up against the same sort of taboos as "Brüno," and in its fumbling, semi-improvised way, it’s equally hilarious and even more subversive.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Liam Neeson has gravely splendid pipes as Ponyo’s father, a once-human wizard who lives underwater and despises humankind for polluting the planet.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Even more than his other genre mash-ups, this is a switchback journey through Tarantino’s twisted inner landscape, where cinema and history, misogyny and feminism, sadism and romanticism collide and split and re-bond in bizarre new hybrids. The movie is an ungainly pastiche, yet on some wacked-out Jungian level it’s all of a piece.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Gracefully directed by Robert Schwentke, the film has a perfect performance by Bana, rangy and haunted, never at home in his body.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Guilt and alienation from Argentina’s Lucrecia Martel, so arty, enervated, and allegorical it might have been made by a European in the early sixties.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The cutting is hyperkinetic, yet Lee is always in synch with the cast’s phenomenal energy. He’s in their thrall--and so are we.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    However cheeky and blasphemous, this is, at heart, a rather sweet little fable. Which of course would mean nothing if it weren’t explosively funny.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    If you can get past the craven concessions to formula, though, it’s rather underful--I mean, wonderful. Taking his cues from John Tenniel’s famous illustrations, Burton indulges his delight in disproportion.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Sensationally effective.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Young Edie Martin, with her chaotic swarm of red ringlets and deadpan dutifulness (she has few lines, but they’re goodies), is the movie’s sign of eternal spring--the butterfly atop the just-opened blossom.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    At its midpoint, the film could go either way: toward "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle" psychosis or something more hopeful and humanistic. It’s a testament to Saavedra’s tough performance that even with a happy ending, you wouldn’t want to leave her with your kids.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The actors playing parents and spouses (among them Steve Buscemi, Halley Feiffer, Portia, and Kevin Hagan) are stunningly believable. I'm not sure how Morton made sense of her character's ebbs and flows, but I never doubted her. She's a mariner in uncharted seas of emotion.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    In the flawless cast, Williams is the most affecting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Calculated to enrage and pulling it off like gangbusters, Don Argott’s documentary The Art of the Steal pits the legacy of the late Albert C. Barnes’s Barnes Foundation (which boasts arguably the world’s finest collection of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art) against the social-climbing, philistine, downright Nixonian machinations of Philadelphia’s wealthiest--who gamed the system and pried the collection loose in defiance of Barnes’s legal will.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The first half of The Yellow Handkerchief is the half-movie of the year, and the rest isn’t bad--just more sentimental, more ordinary.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    This is an extraordinary film.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Narrated by Rhys Ifans with the dryness of a dessicated toad, Exit Through the Gift Shop is both an exhilarating testament to serendipity and an appalling testament to art-world inanity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Anton Chekhov's The Duel is convincingly-yes--Chekhovian.

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