David Edelstein
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For 1,661 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Winter's Bone
Lowest review score: 0 Domino
Score distribution:
1,661 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    At least this time "Goopy" Paltrow gets to perform a few superheroics herself, along with enduring some heavy-duty torture that’s bound to please her haters — for whom the sight of the top of her face being peeled off in "Contagion" was like Christmas in July.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Uncle Boonmee is entrancing-and also, if you're not sufficiently steeped in its rhythms, narcotizing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    As a narrative, it’s clunky. As a whodunit, it’s third-rate. As the drama of a closed-off man’s awakening, it’s predictable. But Haggis has got hold of a fiercely urgent subject: the moral devastation of American soldiers serving in (and coming home from) Iraq. At its heart are deeper mysteries--and a tragedy that reaches far beyond anything onscreen.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Half the time in the mystical saga Youth Without Youth, I had no idea what the movie was about, but I always felt that the director and screenwriter, Francis Ford Coppola, did, and that he was deeply in tune--and having a hell of a time--with the material.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Batmanglij keeps the movie even-keeled, full of medium close-ups, underscored by ambient plinks and shimmers, with nothing to break the trance until a last scene that upends everything we thought we knew.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Begin Again is very funny, mostly because Ruffalo makes such an adorably rumpled drunken a--hole.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Nearly perfect for what it is.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Atonement works reasonably well as a tragic romance, but that sting is dulled. As a book, it was a blow to the head; as a movie, it’s an adaptation of a book.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Menzel’s touch is sprightly, lyrical, mischievously understated.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Simply a jolly good (k)night out.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Adam Shankman's movie of the Broadway Hairspray gets better as it lumbers along, but there’s something garish about its hustle--it’s like an elephant trumpeting in your face.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Sometimes I wonder how Mamet can get out of bed, he's so paranoid, let along crank out two-thirds (at least) of a thriller this crackerjack. I hope that next time he leaves out the (booby) prize.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The biggest disappointment is the role that Baumbach wrote for Charles Grodin — his juiciest in many years but with only one or two laugh lines. If nothing else, I wanted Grodin to kick Stiller’s butt across the screen for desecrating the name of "The Heartbreak Kid."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film is wrenching all the same, and subtle enough in its portrait of the four major grown-up characters to qualify as Jamesian.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    He’s (Singer) reborn — deft, elegant, spring-heeled — in X-Men: Days of Future Past. The special effects don’t bog him down: They lift the movie to a surreal and more emotional dimension.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Over-the-top and shockingly vicious. But what strikes some critics as complexity feels to me like shame--the shame of Cronenberg, an uncompromising director whose bloodshed has always been genuinely horrifying.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The tony cast emotes like mad, but polished Brits are so temperamentally unlike Russians that every four-syllable patronymic sounds like iambic pentameter.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It manages to be funny and charming while capturing a lot of disturbing things about the way we live now.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Napoleon Dynamite is too low-wattage to be a true nerd anthem, but it's charming in retrospect.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It helps that Reilly is the opposite of a slob-comic. With his hangdog melancholy, he makes even the nonstop cunnilingus allusions poignant-the product of emotional longing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This is a mood piece, shapeless but often lyric.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The driving in the film is a thing of beauty.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A shameless but exuberantly well-done caper comedy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The script, by Dan Fogelman, is unusually and gratifyingly bisexual - i.e., it boasts scenes from both the male and female points of view!
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Whatever the style, the point is blunt, reductive: Civilized humans can transform, in an instant, into blindingly destructive forces of nature. Not exactly an original thesis, but as a source of movie fodder, it’s scarily entertaining.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It comes together neatly, perhaps too neatly to be … poetry. But it's not prosaic, either. It has a lucid grace.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Gibney does finally kick the focus off Abramoff to bemoan the legalized-bribery system that’s the rule, not the exception.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is diverting enough -- it's good fun -- but much of the genius is gone with the wind.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There's something appealing about the movie's unpretentious carnival of carnage, although I could have done without the flamethrower assault on a school bus to raise the stakes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's on the verge of being really good...his narrative peters out without a decent payoff. It's a testament to the rage and anxieties that he has brilliantly tapped into that he can't get away with a subdued conflagration and a lame twist at the end.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie nails all this, and it’s smashingly effective as melodrama. But McQueen’s directorial voice — cold, stark, deterministic — keeps it from attaining the kind of grace that marks the voice of a true film artist.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    She's (Jolie) the most amazing special effect in movies. The best thing in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider is a bungee-jumping ballet that Lara performs late at night in her mansion, soaring high and low in Japanese silk pajamas and with her hair pulled tightly back.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's not fresh terrain for satire, yet most of the jokes play riotously well.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Mud
    It’s hard to believe Nichols thinks he can get away with all this and harder still to believe he does. It’s the quality of the attention that he brings — his focus — that makes his work so engrossing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Equal parts trippy, tacky, and monumental, the blend surprisingly agreeable, a happy change from all those aggressively down-to-earth superhero flicks like "Iron Man."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Cooper's performance is outlandishly great, but Phillippe’s knocks Breach down a peg.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Praying With Lior engages us on so many levels it transcends its middle-class Jewish milieu.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The briskness of The Sessions works against it: It lacks the fullness of the best films of its ilk, chief among them Jim Sheridan's "My Left Foot." But Lewin lets his eye wander pleasingly.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Head-On doesn't sound like a lot of fun, but it keeps you on edge, laughing nervously, appalled and, against all odds, entertained.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Hot Fuzz is fun, and it's nice to see all the English character actors who aren't busy in Harry Potter films, but it lacks its predecessor's freshness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is clipped, blunt, and grimly realistic. It is practically a POLICIER , although the suspense is mitigated by our knowledge that the investigation will end badly.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    In his florid sci-fi opera Interstellar, Christopher Nolan aims for the stars, and the upshot is an infinite hoot — its dumbness o’erleaps dimensional space. It’s hugely entertaining, though.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie is a collision between inspiration and tastelessness, between the defiantly quirky and the wholesomely homogenized. I hated it in principle--I hate most modern Disney cartoons--but adored a good deal of it in practice.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Here's what's depressing: that, given the millions spent on defense by multinational conglomerates, our last best hope isn't the courts but the fickle attentions of glossy magazines and the noblesse oblige of celebrities.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Apart from having no particular reason to exist onscreen, especially at these prices, it's not half bad.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's totally implausible, and yet it gets at something unnervingly real: the way that people can blow a budding relationship by being too honest with each other.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    All its themes are laid out like index cards on a screenwriter's bulletin board, and each plot turn seems so inevitable that you'll think you saw this movie in a previous life. (You did.)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's tricky, it's surprising, and it's largely faithful to the original mini-series, but in context it's a nonevent. It's like a time bomb that's never dismantled but never explodes. The movie is good enough that the ending leaves you … not angry, exactly. Unfulfilled.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Frustratingly anemic, the filmmakers hiding behind their good taste and sensitivity. They might as well have gone for broke, since Plath and Hughes' daughter accused them of monstrous exploitation anyway.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Apart from a few choice flashbacks, the action is crawlingly linear--and opaque.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Too long, too sexist, and too--shall we say--flaccid. But it has its moments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s puffed up in obvious ways but disarmingly puckish in others. As that capering pirate, De Niro is god-awful--yet his gung-ho spirit wins him Brownie points.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s a cracker­jack piece of filmmaking, a declaration that he’s (Eastwood) not yet ready to be classified as an Old Master, that he can out-Bigelow Kathryn Bigelow. Morally, though, he has regressed from the heights of Letters From Iwo Jima (2006). In more ways than one, the Iraq occupation is seen through the sight of a high-powered rifle. The movie is scandalously blinkered.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I half-admire its exquisite balancing act, squeezing laughs out of its leading lady's wardrobe, vocabulary, gestures, and cretinously oblivious Beverly Hills sense of entitlement, while simultaneously demonstrating her brilliance, sturdy ethics, and unflappable egalitarianism.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie isn't as world-shattering as those bouts: It's a regretful-old-warrior weeper.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    With its featherweight premise, casually amoral heroes, and exotic locales, it conjures up an era (the '60s and '70s) when twisty, romantic heist pictures were routinely ground out as tax shelters.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I wish it were as much fun as its prospectus. The truth is that The Truth About Charlie gets increasingly tiresome.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Aeon Flux is not that terrible. It's certainly more fun than a lot of films that get lovingly showcased.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    If Boiler Room isn't an especially challenging movie, it's still a damn good melodrama -- a boilermaker.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    This is familiar terrain jazzed up by unfamiliar voices--principally Terrence Howard and his high-pitched, singsong drawl. You don't quite know what he's thinking; he might even be demented. But he keeps you watching and guessing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Charming self-made vehicle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Amounts to a pantheistic love-in: "A Fish Called Wanda" for vegetarians.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    As I've implied, this is a great midnight movie: I enjoyed every patchily edited, ham-fisted scene. But I don't like seeing the wonderful Kate Winslet look stupid, or the wonderful Laura Linney abase herself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I'm not sure what Kontroll adds up to, but if you're looking for a rackety journey into the bowels of urban life, this is your movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Margot at the Wedding doesn’t develop; it just skips from one squirmy scene to the next.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Zoo
    Devor doesn't endorse horse-on-man sex, but he does attempt--with sympathy--to account for the appeal.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Holy Rollers fuses a somber, old-world palette with a jittery urban unease--a good mix of tones. It’s also wonderfully acted.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A wee, breezy thing with painterly cinematography (by Jean Yves Escoffier) and with actors who are mostly fun to watch. It sails by in 103 minutes and the clunky stuff isn't painful, which makes a change from LaBute's usual grueling studies in human callousness and depravity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Scene by scene, Jindabyne has dramatic force, but it's an awfully long slog. Carver's smartest tactic was never outstaying his welcome.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Too bad the movies collapses at the end when we find out what's really going on. Baghead is so much more vivid when it's indefinite.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s campier than its predecessor, but its gung ho union of black, white, and Asian gangs against reactionaries who’d destroy them is a virtuosic assertion of punky Parisian multiculturalism.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It would be imprecise to say that the thrill is gone, because The Lost World recovers from its turgid opening and comes to life, or does so in spasms.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It gets the job done and then some, but it's ugly and clumsily shaped, and every scene is there to rack up sociological points.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    There's too much miserable reality and not a lot of transcendent dance, and the director, Stephen Daldry, doesn't cover the action from enough angles.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I don't know what Pollock is supposed to be about, but as it stands—by default—it's the most blood-freezing Jewish-mother nightmare ever filmed. Pollock would give Woody Allen the willies.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    By now we’ve seen so many good, bad, and indifferent Sherlocks that it’s almost a relief to get something different, however wrongheaded. And there’s no such thing as too much Downey.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    As amusing as the movie is, I think in the end that Ascher misses the labyrinth for the trees.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Though a mess by all conventional narrative standards, Avengers: Age of Ultron is a fascinating case study in the rules of “universe” storytelling. Chief among them is that a film may not be self-contained — it must constantly allude to worlds outside its own. Marvel fans want extra characters, extra subplots, in-jokes that pander to their supposed breadth of knowledge. They don’t want closure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A ferocious yet lyrical piece of filmmaking--an enchanted bloodbath.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A slick, not-too-thoughtful love story.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Even if you find the satire in Josie and the Pussycats self-serving, you might still love the movie, buy the soundtrack, and surrender to the hype. That's what happened to me.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Levinson must think he's on safe ground morally by keeping Bandits bloodless, as if the absence of carnage somehow makes kidnapping and armed robbery wholesome.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It doesn't entirely gel, but few directors could explore the collision of the ego and the outside world with such sympathy or purpose. It's possible that the NC-17 has never been used to such PG-13 ends.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie is meant to get into you like a virus, and it does.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    In any case, the last twenty minutes of Breaking Dawn are so harrowing that it's possible to forget that most of the acting is soap-operatic (the guy who plays Carlisle is aging to look like Liberace) and the dialogue from hunger. The movie's that primal.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Something appalling about the way he turns to the camera with a look of sorrow: Michael Moore as a suffering Christ. It's an insult to his own movie, which at its considerable best transcends his thuggish personality.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    This isn't an objectionable movie, just a mild, obvious, and rather limp one, with plenty of little jolts but no ejaculatory payoff.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie itself isn’t dull. It’s moderately stylish, moderately suspenseful, fun in patches. It hits its marks. But the setup lacks urgency.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Closer is in the same arena as Labute, and I found it sour and airless, with the feel of a mathematical proof. The acting is superb, though, with one key exception. Jude Law.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Mr. 3000 is refreshing because it ends on a slightly sour, dissonant note: Stan wins, but not in the way he imagines. It's a nice change from the sports films that end with fists pumping and crowds going nuts.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    One of the more enjoyably terrible movies of the year.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The decomposition of the soul is the goal of a Stasi incarceration, the promised end for an enemy of the state, and there is something about the movie’s pacing--the silences, the drone of the narration ("The name of your enemy is hope?…?")--that wears you down.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie isn't unwatchable. It's clumsily good-natured, the actors are appealing, and there are worse ways to spend two hours than looking at pretty young girls in shorts kicking balls. But the movie is way, way too pleased with itself.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    When those talking heads metamorphose into familiar ranting heads, it becomes another mesmerizing right-wing horror show.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Jolie gets the dirty/ennobling job done. If the narrative is finally unsatisfying, it’s because the last vital chapter — the way in which Zamperini was able to have a life after years of unspeakable cruelty and the dashing of his Olympic hopes — is signaled in a couple of title cards before the closing credits. Unbroken proves that Zamperini could take it and make it — but make what of it?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie gets funnier and less obvious as it goes along, and Zooey Deschanel is a hoot as a disdainfully bored co-worker who ritually insults the zombie chain-store shoppers -- but what is The Good Girl saying, exactly?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Ken Hixon's script contrives a lot of mutual-healing set pieces and then sadly but shrewdly aborts them: That makes the drama more Chekhovian than "quite real."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    As in his pithy, tuneful songs-many written from different perspectives, in different styles-Merritt is committed to stylizing his misery instead of boring you with it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Danny Huston is screamingly funny as the alternately finicky and savage Head Ghoul--he’s like something spewed forth from the bowels of the Politburo. The problem is structural.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    An appropriately generic title for a droning, high-toned little heist picture with no dash and no raison d'être.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Bachelorette has some big gaps, and it isn't what you'd call fun - it's not "Bridesmaids 2." But lovely women doing genuinely ugly things makes for a potent combination.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's too florid, too calculated, too too. Here's my emotional declaration: I love Richard Curtis' work. But I can't help feeling that the Bard of Embarrassment could use a touch more shame.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The film is too wan and distanced to sweep you up, but it holds you.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Extraordinary Measures has a soppy piano-and-strings score, but the primal fear of loss sharpens every scene.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Pirates is OK, in patches even better.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A feminist sitcom tricked up with garish violence and garrulous hit men.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The screenwriter, James Solomon, does the poor job only a liberal could at making the case for a Cheneyesque "dark side," and he isn't helped by Kline's wooden acting. Too bad. The Conspirator is eloquent enough to let the other side have its say.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Ozon devises tantalizing scenarios and immerses himself completely--then seems happy to tread water.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Con-artist caper comedies are almost always piffle, but there's a fierce, cruel competition at the heart of Heartbreakers that gives it some bite.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The prolific Patrice Leconte takes a break from mythic, life-and-death scenarios with My Best Friend, a sitcom that threatens to take a rockier emotional path before swerving back into the comfy zone. It’s better when it’s threatening, but Leconte knows his audience.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Yes, I cringed at the casting, too, especially when, watching the trailer, I heard Parker deliver the narration in the same voice she used for Carrie in "Sex and the City." But Kate is funnier - less arch - than Carrie, and Parker reminds you what a dizzy, all-in, high-risk comic actress she can be when she's not too busy showing off the couture.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    For all its indirection, Meek's Cutoff is an utterly conventional film. But it's worth asking whether Reichardt's drowsy rhythms, stripped-down scenario, and female vantage add up to something illuminating. And here's where she earns at least some of those plaudits she's been getting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Araki is trying to work from the inside out; and he captures feelings about sexual exploitation that I've never seen onscreen--not all of them negative.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A decent-enough rambunctious Southern-drive-in sort of time-waster, missing only the bare boobs that would make it the perfect socially irresponsible sexist entertainment for rednecks and uptight liberal elites who'd like to live the country-boy dream for a few hours. (Howdy, y'all!)
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie says that the rebellious spirit that generates art can also consume and destroy -- that there's no undangerous way to ride the tiger.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Payne's movie is flat, depressed, and at times -- given this director's talent -- disappointingly curdled; it needs every quivering molecule of Nicholson's repressed rage to keep it alive and humming.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie should be seen with a large, responsive audience--the better to live with it in the moment instead of worrying about where it’s going.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The whole movie is a good try.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The combination of childlike glee and grown-up precision is a wonder. The movie actually earns the right to exist, which is no mean feat.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The pretty good thriller Lockout peaks with its first shot...When the camera moves and the plot kicks in - as it must - the movie loses its witty economy. Things get cluttered.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I also thrilled to identify with a male lead (Jon Favreau) who's as brilliant and crazy and self-absorbed as Woody Allen or Albert Brooks but whose self-absorption doesn't shape and color everything else in the movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Apart from Theron and Christina Ricci as her lover, there's nothing in Monster that rises above the level of doggedly well-meaning, although the film is worth seeing for the acting and as a sort of palate-teaser for Broomfield and Churchill's documentary.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    If you can forget what it’s saying, Divergent is fairly entertaining.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Panic Room is fluidly made, and it keeps the audience quiet and unpleasantly gripped. But the only surprise is the absence of surprise; that trap is in too-plain view.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The glibness exhausts you, and the Coens are emotionally so far outside their subject that Intolerable Cruelty is finally no different from most of the other dumb slapstick spoofs that pass for screwball comedy these days.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The best scene is when Hellboy and Abe get drunk and sing out raucously, which after "Hancock" suggests a trend toward superhero alcoholism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It would be easy to dismiss as 100 percent ersatz if it didn't rekindle at least some of the old excitement - and if the magic of Spielberg's older movies didn't filter through, like light from a distant galaxy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The X-Files isn't so much a bad movie as it is a crackerjack piece of television. It's crisply made--not sodden like many of the "Star Trek" pictures. But it's as annoyingly open-ended as the rest of the series' episodes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A more down-to-earth actor would sentimentalize Breakfast on Pluto and make for an awkward fit with its peculiar mix of tones. Murphy's strangeness--his chill estrangement--makes his campy "Kitten" persona more poignant.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s absorbing for a long while, at least half its two-hour running time — an evocatively photographed soap opera with actors who are impossibly gorgeous and yet human-looking — but it goes on and on, piling on twists, adding devices so clunky they’d have embarrassed most nineteenth-century problem-dramatists, refusing to jell despite the actors’ prodigious suffering.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I prefer the Farrellys when they're disreputable and push the boundaries of taste, because they're otherwise a tad sentimental.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A frightening, infuriating, yet profoundly compassionate documentary about the indoctrination of children by the Evangelical right.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The more subversive Instinct gets in proclaiming free will an illusion fostered by a rigidly repressive society, the more captive it seems to a rigidly repressive studio marketing department.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    There is nothing wrong with the action sequences beyond their sheer length and number. They're in the "Road Warrior" mode: hyper-fast and vicious.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The jumping around is as deft as a hippo in a tutu, and the director, Gavin Hood, never finds a rhythm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Frances Ha is an irritant when it lingers. When Baumbach’s touch is more glancing — when he cuts before the humiliation — it sings.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Watching Spike Lee’s decent but unmemorable remake of Park Chan-wook’s 2003 revenge picture "Oldboy," I kept trying to figure out why he’d done it.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's an entertainingly cynical small movie. Aaron Sorkin's dialogue tumbles out so fast it's as if the characters want their brains to keep pace with their processors; they talk like they keyboard, like Fincher directs, with no time for niceties.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Birdman is the very definition of a tour de force, and Iñárritu’s overheated technique meshes perfectly with the (enjoyable) overacting—the performers know this is a theatrical exercise and obviously relish the chance to Do It Big. But what comes out of the characters’ mouths is not so fresh.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The tasteless bombardment that is Les Misérables would, under most circumstances, send audiences screaming from the theater, but the film is going to be a monster hit and award winner, and not entirely unjustly.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie does get under your skin (the tremulous misfit girl, Hannah, might be a breakout role model), but the way it has been put together reminds me of those animal shows where the crew nudges the gazelles in the direction of the lions with multiple cameras standing by.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A Joyful Noise overcomes. The big numbers are a gospel-pop-funk fusion that made me think, Hmmm, this seems very processed - before I noticed my feet were tapping of their own accord. How can you resist that wah-wah funk guitar?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The key to a good B-mystery is that all the actors should be a little stilted. You should never know the difference between an actor acting badly and an actor doing a masterful acting job of someone acting badly. In Non-Stop, there is much excellent bad acting.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie goes soft. But it has the unpretentious energy and charm of a good YA girls' novel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    At its best, 22 Jump Street is less an action comedy than a loosely plotted revue, and though it’s not as witty as either Joe Dante’s "Gremlins 2: The New Batch" or Edgar Wright’s "Hot Fuzz" (in which the directors evinced genuine love for their chosen genres), it’s sure as hell better than a straight buddy-cop sequel.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The Slums of Beverly Hills never gels, but it has a likable spirit, and it's exceedingly easy on the eye, with lots of pretty girls and wry evocations of '70s fashions and decor.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It would be barely passable under normal circumstances, but in 3-D it's a circus of excellent FX.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's a rich idea -- a Hartley-esque variation on the theme of American Innocents Abroad. And it works superbly until -- well, Grim's the word.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    To work onscreen, Thank You for Smoking needed to be fast, scruffy, and offhand. But even the good lines here last a self-congratulatory beat too long. Aaron Eckhart is likable, but he's too hangdog and naturalistic for a part that could have used a brisk young Jack Lemmon type.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Kill Bill is about nothing more (or less) than its director's passion for the mindless action pictures that got him through adolescence. It isn't sex without love: It's an orgy with just enough love.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s fast, rousing, and blessedly brief.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Despite the clunkiness, Estevez's commitment to his father's generation’s idealism (and its murder) commands respect.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    As cheap as the whole set-up is, the actors make wonderful music together - even if there's not much left of Eastwood's vocal cords except a handful of dust.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A thriller of serpentine excitement all the way up to that dud of a climax.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    She lip-syncs convincingly to Piaf's songs. Even when she overacts like mad, she makes you think she’s Piaf overacting like mad--the little sparrow with the foghorn pipes.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Full Throttle is full-throttle camp: It's like a third-rate Austin Powers picture cut to the whacking, attention-deficit-disorder tempo of "Moulin Rouge."
    • 28 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The best part is Jemaine Clement as Benjamin’s grandiose genre hero, Dr. Ronald Chevalier. Even if you love him on "Flight of the Conchords," you’ll be unprepared for his genius--and charisma.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A too-pat but very funny comedy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The film is seamlessly made, its mood balanced dreamily between sexy-funny and sexy-scary.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie isn't a dud: It has exuberant bits and breathtaking (money money money) effects. But it's supposed to be fun and inspirational, and it's too leaden for liftoff.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    But even with bits that are crazily inspired, Forgetting Sarah Marshall is depressing. The Apatow Factory is too comfy with its workers’ arrested development to move the boundary posts. If they could find scripts by female writers that dramatize the other side of the Great Sexual Divide, it might be a place of joy--and embarrassed recognition--for everyone.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The first truly countercultural apocalypse fantasy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Pure misery.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Fascinating for the issues--ethical, aesthetic, psychoanalytic--it raises. But it doesn't fully come together.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s the writer, Diablo Cody, and the director, Jason Reitman, who have screws loose. Or maybe they’re just desperate to make their film a chick "Rushmore" or "Garden State."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The film is superbly acted (especially by Macdissi, who makes the father a borderline hysteric), but it's hard to know what to feel except, "How can any girl navigate this oversexualized culture?"
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Baldwin is so good in the coming-of-age gangster drama Brooklyn Rules that it's like watching a voodoo priest.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie is sweet but deeply suspect: It's like "Lost Horizon" re-imagined by a realtor.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The Sitter feels slapdash and quick, but you might not want to have it any other way.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A simple, chronological history, narrated with melancholy gravitas by Morgan Freeman.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's a daring and original effort, yet so noncommittal--so purposely vague--that it's apt to leave you flummoxed: at once stricken and etherized.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I’m not sure Morris clinches his case, but I’m not sure he wants to: His aim is to throw a monkey wrench into the cogs of our perception.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Fearless as these racers are, it's hard to muster enthusiasm for a movie that plays chicken and then swerves about a mile before the collision.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I must admit that I find those motifs -- and the Farrellys' universe in general -- more sweet than offensive, and I liked Say It Isn't So just so. So there.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Rambling and conflicted as it is, it's one of the most entertaining African-American comedies of manners ever made.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Garry Shandling is poignant and hilarious as an alien stud.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I think of Waitress as an overstuffed, overcooked pie--too ungainly to eat all of, too generous to pass up, too heartbreaking to contemplate for long.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Attains a level of quiet grace. It's too bad that I can barely remember the movie after only a week. Nothing lasts, indeed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    At least the movie never bogs down. But you only get a taste of what made the Clash for a brief period the most exciting band on that side of the Atlantic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Better approached as an “oooooh” and “awww” fest.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Most of the movie works because the blonde Weixler has a darling-daffy face (a pinch of Alicia Silverstone, a dollop of Drew Barrymore) and a should-I-or-shouldn’t-I ambivalence about sex that’s part realism, part screwball.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Miss Potter hardly deserves ridicule. It's sweet with lovely Lake District vistas and a heartfelt endorsement of land conservation. It will certainly play well with older audiences and the kind of adolescent girls who draw faces in their O's.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The film has one indelible asset: Mark Strong, who plays the Jordanian spymaster Hani. He's sleek and lounge-lizard sharp like a young Andy Garcia, and he could be bigger than Garcia. The Jordanian holds all the cards, and opposite two superstars, Strong is the only actor who holds the camera.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    There's no wonder or elation or even dopy sincerity here - just a high level of proficiency and, yes, a lot of expensive CGI.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's almost criminal the way the central relationship of High Fidelity has been left such a void.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Duplicity is deeply shallow--cheap reversals all the way down. But it's a passably amusing brainteaser.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's a tough, beautifully judged performance (Davis) - it gives this too-soft movie a spine.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I like — as always — what Chandor attempts: not just to denounce capitalism but to explain in detail how people go wrong. But the overcomposed, sedate A Most Violent Year lacks the one thing it most needs: violence.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Even with her stinko lines, Weaver has never been as flabbergastingly gorgeous and charismatic. She's tall and lean and meteor-hard, and you can almost believe there's really acid in her blood, and that no alien in its right mind would mess with her.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    If The Theory of Everything cut as deeply as Redmayne's performance, it might be on the level of "My Left Foot." But there are so damn many problems, easy to ignore at first in the elation of watching Redmayne and the gossamer Felicity Jones as his future wife, Jane, but impossible to shake off in the last third.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Selick has a great fantasy filmmaker's artistry, but he lacks that overflowing Geppetto-esque love that brings puppets to life. In Coraline, he's woozy with his own lyricism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    There's something too refined and emotionally neutral about Nowhere in Africa, as if Link had directed with white gloves. Maybe she knew how loaded this African-Jewish subject was and didn't want it push it too hard. Maybe that's why she won an Oscar.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    What a shock when George Lucas finds his footing and the saga once again takes hold.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s Aronofsky’s least personal work. So you get a fat dose of conventional melodrama with your Old Testament: It’s the antediluvian "Gladiator."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    When the film shifts to Shanghai and the club Casablanca, there's too much lustrous-hued loitering and too few martial­-arts set pieces.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    City of Men is clunky and often contrived, but there’s something haunting about fatherless boys in a blighted place fumbling to teach themselves what it means to be a man.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Movies are the lesser medium for Fey and Carell. They’re the stars of two relatively sophisticated, media-savvy network sitcoms, yet their big-screen comedies are retro.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Occasionally dissonant, but it's remarkably cleareyed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    This seesaw of shame and self-justification might not speak for the most murderous segment of the German populace, but it's a peculiarly eloquent representation of the silent, obedient majority.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    This could be the premise of a zany comedy, but the mood of The Future is, from the outset, defeatist - annoyingly defeatist, to be frank.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I found the film -- excruciatingly flat-footed, with one of the most exasperating scores (by Philip Glass) ever written. The most fascinating thing in the movie is a nose.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's true that the movie, arrested between documentary and drama, doesn't quite do justice to either medium: The actors playing Joe and Simon don't have anything like "lines" to simulate "drama," or even just "conversation," while the real guys often fall back on bland English understatement.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Elektra isn't half-bad--only maybe two-fifths.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Sutton finds the lyrical tension in torpor; he shows how Willis’s artistic vacuum isn’t a passive thing, how it eats into him, how it even permeates the natural world.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    After an electrifyingly feral opening, the movie settles down into a cogent courtroom drama, with no real cinematic highs but no jaw-dropping lows, either.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Brokeback Mountain could use a little more of it--by which I mean more sweat and other bodily fluids. Ang Lee's formalism is so extreme that it's often laughable, and the sex is depicted as a holy union: Gay love has never been so sacred.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Spike Lee is a virtuoso filmmaker, a wizard at selling a sequence, but he'll never make an entirely coherent movie until he learns to go deeper into his subjects instead of wider with them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Hanks and Zemeckis (and writer William Broyles Jr.) are so intent on making an epic of the spirit that they can't bring themselves to acknowledge the comic, narcissistic side of their desert island fantasy. And so on simple, human terms, the picture gets all gummed up.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There are times when Dafoe's accent strays into Billy Crystal Yiddish, but the notion of Vlad the Impaler aging into a finicky old Jew has its own kind of piquancy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Blue Ruin is more artful and evocative than any recent revenge picture, but it’s still drivel.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The thing is scary as hell when it's all creaks and thumps and doors swinging open. Then come the explanations, the special effects, and the inevitable feeling of been-there-been-­bombarded-by-that.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In patches it's agreeably lurid, but it's otherwise ho-hum.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Bier dramatizes our ambivalence so earnestly that it's tempting to give her awards rather than admit that the movie is a crushing bore.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is based on a novel by Susan Minot--one of those books where the author doesn't deign to put dialogue in quotation marks for fear of dispelling the dreamlike mood. It works on paper, but Minot, who shares credit for the adaptation with fellow novelist Michael Cunningham, doesn't understand that screenwriting is the art of taking away.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's hard to get past the primitiveness of Allen’s fantasies.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Spiderwick. There’s nothing wrong with it that passion and personality couldn’t fix.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is sometimes gentle to the point of blandness, but it's never flimsy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    An unusually powerful mess, a broad satire of suburban self-indulgence with little in the way of a consistent style, and with a character who's serious business: a convicted child molester.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is repetitive, top-heavy: Wright blows his wad too early. But a different lead might have kept you laughing and engaged.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I was all revved up to have a whale of a fascist good time, and S.W.A.T. left me let down and pissed-off.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Am I the only one who finds the substance of this movie repulsive?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Life After Beth is a reasonably fun, medium-gory horror comedy that’s better before the innards hit the fan.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Law gives a doozy of a performance: He's fond of bulging his eyes, curling his head like a gargoyle, and displaying a set of rotten yellow teeth. This is some of the most flamboyantly bad acting since Brad Pitt in "Twelve Monkeys" (1995). An Oscar nomination would appear inevitable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The middling romantic comedy Smart People, which centers on a hyperintellectual dysfunctional family, is of interest chiefly for the first post-Juno role of Ellen Page.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Like a lot of Gilliam's movies it's too overloaded--antic, indulgent, overdesigned--to get off the ground for more than a minute or two at a stretch.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Love it or laugh at it, you will gaze on Southland Tales with awe.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's fascinating trying to separate the thirties material from the mostly maladroit additions.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If you can stay awake, you'll see a performance by ­Keaton that is radiant in its simplicity, all ditheriness shaken off. She's still ­peaking - ­someone give her a great role.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    What saves Zatoichi is that it ends -- for no clear reason -- with a foot-stomping ensemble dance number that is both delightful and unhinging: It sends you home with spasmodic giggles, convinced this Japanese imp has discovered a new path to your unconscious.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Except for a screamingly funny climax in which he attempts to kidnap Pamela Anderson (who reportedly wasn't in on the joke), I found the Borat feature (directed by Larry Charles, who does similar duties on "Curb Your Enthusiasm") depressing; and the paroxysms of the audience reinforced the feeling that I was watching a bearbaiting or pigsticking.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    He does gorgeous work, but in Mission to Mars he's only going through the motions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Pacific Rim made me marvel at the technology of movies, but never the magic of them.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film has no spirit of inquiry -- no spirit at all, really.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Recruit is like vaudeville night at Bellevue.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    McKellen's actions are queerly unpredictable (pun intended), but every plot other twist is portentously foreshadowed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I think Levinson missed a chance to get something unique and audacious on screen.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Weds an epic, sometimes visionary, depiction of the afterlife to a script and story with fewer psychological layers than the average Hallmark card.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    To be fair, some of it is good, very good. Jersey Boys has an easy, likable gait. It’s Eastwood’s most fluid film: He gets the swing of the music without fancy editing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Evocative as it is, The Road comes up short, not because it’s bleak but because it’s monotonous.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The visuals have so much intrinsic motion that it's too bad Robots is oppressively rollercoasterish.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Burn After Reading is untranscendent, a little tired, the first Coen brothers picture on autopilot. In the words of the CIA superior, it’s "no biggie."
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hong Kong action fans hoping for spontaneous combustion from the American debut of superstar Chow Yun-Fat might want to turn their weapons on the producers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie has grand (and Grand Guignol) bits and pieces, but despite the hype it’s no big deal. By horror standards, the premise isn’t especially outlandish.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    About Time is like a sermon that starts with a few good jokes and ends with tremulous exhortations to live, live.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It has a gritty feel and a tight, methodical, one-thing-after-another tempo.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Directed by Bryan Singer in a break from his gayish superhero movies, it's a low-key procedural with a dollop of suspense--although perhaps not enough to make up for the foregone conclusion.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If "Psycho" and "Peeping Tom" are the seminal killer-as-voyeur movies, Vacancy is the nasty little runt offspring with no other purpose in life but to gnaw on you.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It starts off with a flourish and winds up limp, like a rabbit pulled out of a hat that turns out to be dead.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is a polished muddle, fitfully amusing but with no spine.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The 61-year-old Stallone would deserve a measure of respect for pulling Rambo off, appalling as it is, but this Fangoria-worthy circus of horrors also features footage of actual Burmese atrocities.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is overnarrated and in spots overwritten, but Brooks, who's primarily a screenwriter, does well with actors, and he has coaxed an extraordinary performance out of the young Jordana Brewster.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hereafter occupies some muzzy twilight zone, too woo-woo sentimental to be real, too limp to make for even a halfway decent ghost story.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Roach is too stiff a director to give Ferrell room to romp. Bits like the one in which he's challenged to recite "The Lord's Prayer" needed extra zigs and zags instead of variations on the same joke. A looser director like Adam McKay (Step Brothers) might have created a happier climate for improv.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Juicy, revved-up, semi-satisfying biopic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Often plays like what it is: a clunky toga-and-sandals picture, with Hollywood compromises abounding.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Coarse and chaotic remake.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Doesn't really work but has a good cast and great craggy ocean-framed scenery.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I'd have a lot more respect for Scott if he were actually the virtuoso he pretends to be. "Gladiator" had lousy, disjunctive action, and Kingdom of Heaven is even more maladroit.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film becomes an aria of agony--but with a rousingly yucko finish!
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is not to say that it is bad writing, shooting, or acting: It would need to be more ambitious to be bad. It is simply the most mundane sort of behavior presented in the most mundane sort of way.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The tit-for-tat scenario ought to be wildly entertaining, but the magic is crude, the characters flyweight, and the story protracted and unpleasant.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Denzel Washington is so powerfully earnest an actor that you never want to laugh at him -- even when you ought to be in stitches.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In LaBute's movies, people are either clueless dupes or psychotic manipulators, while art is meant to rub your face in unpleasant "truths." And I think he takes a little too much pleasure in that nose-rubbing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Thoroughly second-rate -- which is to say that it waddles when it ought to whiz, clanks when it strives for cornball poetry, and transforms its august stars into something akin to a manic dinner-theater troupe.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A climactic twist that's among the stupidest I've ever seen-almost up there with another Costner movie, "No Way Out," and "The Life of David Gale."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The grandeur of the Lord of the Rings trilogy [has] been replaced by something that resembles tatty summer-stock theater.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I hope that in Part 2, Yates and screenwriter Steve Kloves give Fiennes a better send-off than Dame J.K. did in her less-than-wizardly climactic wandathon. Having made us sit through two and a half hours with no payoff, they'd better not go all Muggle on us. Next time, we want magic, people.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It more or less works.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    No mainstream filmmaker since Orson Welles can touch Steven Spielberg when it comes to camera movement and composition--or, more precisely, to composition that gets more vivid as the camera moves...It's the work of a man with film storytelling in his blood. What a bummer when the story he has to tell is a cosmic nothing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I enjoyed this piece of southern-fried screwball Gothic whimsy (with jolts of CGI spell-casting for the multiplex crowd) so much that I’m sad to admit that it’s nowhere near as potent as "Twilight."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A brisk feminist melodrama that is, historically speaking, a load of wank. It has the feel of a game of “telephone,” in which information is progressively mangled.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Swinton is good enough to take your mind off the not-too-compelling ambiguities.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At times, you could actually mistake Tears of the Sun for a blunt modern parable instead of an opportunistic mixture of up-to-the-minute atrocities and old-fashioned corn.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If there’s a sure thing in movies, it’s that if you cast Nicolas Cage in a role in which he goes crazy, he’ll rise to the occasion and keep on rising until he seems even loonier than his character.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The first hour is evocative and creepy...But once the trajectory is clear and the squeamish New York intellectual Quaid has to stand up and fight for his homestead, the boringness seeps into you like the damp.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is ho-hum, straight-to-video material. And yet, even at its most crawlingly linear, Jackie Brown is diverting. If nothing else, I was diverted by the director's gall at stretching out those vacuous scenes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Inland Empire is way, way beyond my powers of ratiocination. It's the higher math.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Brutally exciting and sometimes brutally inept.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The parents are the casualties of Mills' misplaced sincerity, which makes Thumbsucker the quintessential misadapted head-scratcher.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    You have to admire a movie that endeavors to moosh together every successful cross-cultural action picture ever made.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie becomes more and more lugubrious, finally ending on a note of high-tragic operatic bathos.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is a bleak, unresolved film, with no release. What keeps it from being a mortal bummer is the music-exquisite sacred choral works, plus Mozart.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is too metronomically paced for Kilmer's routines to develop any rhythm. The direction by Phillip Noyce is fluid but impersonal. Endless studio tinkering seems to have dissolved its spine.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Fifty Shades of Grey is nowhere near as laughable as you might have feared (or perversely hoped for): It’s elegantly made, and Dakota Johnson is so good at navigating the heroine’s emotional zigs and zags that you want to buy into the whole cobwebbed premise.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In their last collaboration, "21 Grams," the director Alejandro González Iñárritu and screenwriter Guillermo Arriaga did syntactical acrobatics to disguise what a dreary and exploitive little soap opera they’d made. Their new movie, Babel, is more mysterious and less coherent.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The only moments of conviction come from an Asian-American dominatrix called Pearl (Lucy Liu), who brings far more glee to the task of beating people up than the picture's star or director. If the audience could have half as much fun as Pearl is having, Payback would be a kick.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Johnson rips off a lot of "Batman," especially in the cathedral climax, but that's not so bad: The movie looks best when it looks like other, better movies.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Sporadically funny but uneasily revisionist screwball comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Jenkins is so desperate to give his love story a social and economic context that he stops the movie cold for a bunch of unrelated white people to articulate their grievances over gentrification--it's as if "Annie Hall" had paused for a seminar on agrarian reform.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie coalesces into nothing: It's one of those films that makes you say, "That was powerful. Now what the hell was it about?"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    What's left is a wan and impersonal whodunnit -- a movie that never gets into your blood.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The tall, cool Kidman works hard to impersonate a woman possessed, but she's not the type of actress to fill in a role that hasn't been filled in on paper.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In The Judge, a legal drama that builds to the requisite Hollywood Dark Night of the Soul, Robert Downey Jr. has a role so far inside his comfort zone that the movie has no drive, no urgency.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Cameron has never been known for his dialogue, but Titanic carries some stinkers that wouldn't make the final draft of a "Days of Our Lives" script.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's a great metaphor - but not a great movie. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris direct in a drably naturalistic style, and the script is thin.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Coogan's mopiness is oddly riveting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Neeson's gravity elevates the action, and there's a fine, prickly performance by an actor new to me, Frank Grillo, as the asshole of the group. But The Grey, despite moments of sublimity, is as predictable as a funeral. When Ottway angrily calls out to God, the nonanswer is sadly redundant.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There are no comic highs, as in a Mike Myers parody, but no action highs, either.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It might even have been a landmark film about race relations had its aura of blunt realism not been dispelled by a toxic cloud of dramaturgical pixie dust.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is slick when it needs to be raw, tidy when it needs to sprawl, and amorphous when it needs to focus.

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