David Edelstein
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For 1,667 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Apostle
Lowest review score: 0 Movie 43
Score distribution:
1,667 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Coogan's mopiness is oddly riveting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Neeson's gravity elevates the action, and there's a fine, prickly performance by an actor new to me, Frank Grillo, as the asshole of the group. But The Grey, despite moments of sublimity, is as predictable as a funeral. When Ottway angrily calls out to God, the nonanswer is sadly redundant.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There are no comic highs, as in a Mike Myers parody, but no action highs, either.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It might even have been a landmark film about race relations had its aura of blunt realism not been dispelled by a toxic cloud of dramaturgical pixie dust.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is slick when it needs to be raw, tidy when it needs to sprawl, and amorphous when it needs to focus.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The funniest things in Be Kind Rewind are not the many moments in which Mike and Jerry look like Ed Wood’s worst nightmare, but when the pair finds expedient ways to do for pennies what would take Brett Ratner millions and be less expressive to boot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Larsson is renowned for his attention to marginal details, which gives his prose a rambling, one-thing-after-another pace that many readers find soothing. Onscreen, the lack of acceleration makes for one of those long Scandinavian winter nights.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The villain comes back more times than Wile E. Coyote. I found it tiresome and witless and numbingly repetitive, but action mavens won't feel cheated.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The gut-whomping, high-concept romantic thriller This Means War is not a distinguished addition to director McG's oeuvre.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A bearable period chick flick with a self-congratulatory “realistic” conceit.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A passably diverting entry in the Tarantino genre of splatter and yuks and soulfully bumbling hit men.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Jackman has musical-theater chops and knows how to sell material this ham-handed; Kidman isn't quite as deft. I've always admired her gumption in working so hard to overcome a certain temperamental tightness--but that tightness has now spread to her skin.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Avenue Montaigne would be difficult to stomach if it weren't so light and uninsistent, and if its actors weren't so charming. I still rolled my eyes--but sometimes I do that when I get a really good croissant.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The drama is so muddled that Shakespeare seems to be getting in the way of Taymor's spectacle, the magic long gone by the time Prospera hurls her staff off into the sea.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Watching The Hunger Games, I was struck both by how slickly Ross hit his marks and how many opportunities he was missing to take the film to the next level - to make it more shocking, lyrical, crazy, daring.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    For all sort of reasons, I was disappointed that there is barely anything of Bruce McGill as the family's hearty swindler. And there is too much of Sarandon, whose big scene--a speech at her late husband's memorial service, complete with jokes and a tap dance--is the movie's most egregious misfire.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is one of Penn's punishing, single-dimension performances, and it seems to be even more whiningly masochistic than what's called for in the script.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Given all its World War II references and parodies, the best audience for Valiant would be addled, octogenarian ex-RAF pilots in the old folks' home.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A second-rate but bearable black comedy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Not even the actress' soulfulness can save the generic climax, in which she tussles with the badder bad guy on a collapsing terrace above a crashing surf. As a colleague muttered, "Murder by numbers is right."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Howard might be a major actor. His DJay, though, is a major character in search of a major author.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Slapped with the generic title The Wolverine, the fifth feature-length appearance of Hugh Jackman’s X-Man John Logan is basically "The Bad News Wolverine Goes to Japan" and is not especially world-shaking.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Scene by scene his (David Gordon Green’s) new film, Snow Angels, isn’t terrible. Parts of it are amusing, and there are wintry images that eat into the mind. But it’s one of the most disjunctive things I’ve ever sat through.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is OK for a January horror picture, but given the premise and the cast--it should wring you out emotionally as it's scaring you witless.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Lovelace is a respectable job, but it never goes deep.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A central figure who’s all bad is even more boring than one who’s all good. He has no dramatic stature. He’s a case study. The audience should be paid to listen up.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie’s take at times is fascinating. But it’s basically one long, sick joke played at half speed. It’s a ponderous, sick joke.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Unsatisfying even if, like me, you're a lifelong aficionado of Nixon-bashing.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's a charcoal draft of a movie -- magically allusive on some levels and utterly opaque on others, a strange combination of the overexplicit and the unwritten.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Crowe gets to use his real Aussie voice, which works better with that poker face, and his underplaying at times has a psychotic intensity. But Ryan looks dopey when she's supposed to be stressed-out.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    We’re supposed to take this more seriously because it takes itself more seriously.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At one point, Van Damme delivers a long, tortured soliloquy about his alienating stardom to the camera in a single take. It's the most amazing piece of acting I've ever seen by a martial artist. But the film itself doesn't rise above the level of a good try.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is an ambitious midlife-crisis movie that valiantly weaves together big themes, among them the nagging guilt of the successful, wealthy artist.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Has anyone involved in this disaster ever heard a real story?
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Passable--just.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The sad part is that How Do You Know is nowhere near as dumb as it looks. A couple of comic set pieces are inspired-or would be, if Brooks's timing weren't off.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At least The Green Hornet is likable, and a refreshing change from the heavy, angst-ridden superhero pictures so beloved by obnoxious fanboys.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Marathon of misery.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The preview—if that's truly what it is—has a beginning, a middle, and an end; a host of good lines; and so many goofy surprises that it's hard to believe that there's anything more to see in the picture itself. I mean … they wouldn't show you the entire movie in the coming attraction, would they?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The ending is powerful..., but Shutter Island is a long slog.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's too bad that halfway through, Collateral turns into a series of loud, chaotic, over-the-top action set pieces in which the existentialist Mann proves he's lousy at action.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I hope I'm not raining on Beasts of the Southern Wild's deluge to say it doesn't always live up to its pretensions. There's a lot of unshaped babble and draggy landscape shots, and the music, so lovely in small doses, is numbing when it's ladled over everything.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I'm glad Korine has pulled himself together, but the film is pretty ramshackle, full of obvious group improvisations that fail to spark and an overdose of bathos.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Anger Management is bearable up to its protracted climax, set in Yankee Stadium, which gets my vote for the most excruciating wind-up of any comedy, ever.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Despite glimmers of wit and a hipper-than-thou cast, it's painstakingly smug, and smaller than the sum of its parts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Che
    Che is an impressive physical feat, but especially in the second part, which gives you day after day of rebels being killed and indigenous poor people not joining the good fight, you start to look forward to Che getting riddled by bullets. The whole movie is a forced march.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Forget Alexander: The film is a pedestal to Angelina the great.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There is one nice pop-up scare against a dozen or so false, ineffectual ones - a poor percentage. As the title states, she is a woman and wears black, but she might as well be a hastily decked-out script girl for all her impact.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The chief casualties are the good actors, who are forced to turn themselves into cartoons.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is another of those dead-kid dramas in which the terrible event is handled like a striptease--tantalizing flashes until the climax.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In the all-star movie adaptation of August: Osage County, another play that holds the stage with fang and claw feels less momentous onscreen.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The first half-hour or so of this caper comedy, which is based on an Elmore Leonard crime novel, goes down like a strawberry daiquiri with a little umbrella.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's coarse, primitive, regressive, often very stupid, and sometimes, against all odds, really a hoot.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Superficially respectful but ultimately cruel.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    That City by the Sea isn't laughed off the screen is testament to Caton-Jones' attention to actors and to some tightly written scenes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I suppose it's too much to expect Pirandellian stature from the madness of Chuck Barris -- but that's about the only thing that would have made this mixed-up ego trip work.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A few billion 1s and 0s in search of a movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie isn’t dead on arrival, like Snyder’s over-reverent "Watchmen." But it’s pleasure-free.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Turns out to be semi-enjoyable, semi-tacky retelling/updating of the old Elizabeth Bathory legend.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    For In Bruges to click, McDonagh needed either to get more real or more fake.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Too often, it’s the MOVIE that isn’t there. What’s meant to be archetypal comes across as superficial.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A spare, melancholy film that is so far in spirit from its source, Philip Roth's "The Dying Animal."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Few films go as obviously and bewilderingly wrong as Chloe, but for the first hour it’s a potent little melodrama in which the smooth, super-controlled storytelling contains the theme of unruly obsession like a straitjacket.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The story doesn’t feel dramatized. It feels pitched.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Max
    As a ravishingly photographed, high-minded meditation on the potential of art and therapy to exorcise the vilest sort of psychological poison, it is positively riotous -- an Everest of idiocy.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Just don't believe the anti-hype. There are lots of reasons to have a good cry these days -- here's a nice, warm place to get squeezed.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Somewhere in this mess, there might be a very good movie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As a scare picture, Signs is good enough. As a religious parable, it's scarier -- and I don't mean that as a compliment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is a noble enterprise, and Downey is stupendous as usual, but Joe Wright's direction is too slick to elicit much feeling.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's fun to see.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Streep and Jones make themselves small: She's chirpy; he's crusty. Incessant pop standards on the soundtrack supply the emotion the director can't. All that's missing are commercials for estrogen cream and erectile-dysfunction meds.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The finished product is in a different league than the whompingly terrible Men in Black II - it hits its marks. But it's not inventive enough to overcome the overarching inertia, the palpable absence of passion.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I laughed -- but mostly to keep from getting depressed about the devolution of mainstream movies.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A perfectly decent second-banana, Rob Schneider, has been over-optimistically elevated to the top of the bunch.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The non-ending turns the whole movie into an elaborate tease, too creepy to dismiss, too shallow to justify its "ambiguities."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The story is hell to follow--the flashbacks aren’t in chronological order--and the nonacting variable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It delighted me; it disgusted me. I celebrate it; I lament it. I'm sure of only one thing: that I don't trust anyone--pro or con--who doesn't feel a twinge of doubt about his or her responses.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Size really is about all that this tedious, underpopulated beanbag of an epic has going for it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The passing of the torch from Raimi to Alvarez is not a momentous occasion. In the end, who really cares? Five years from now, will you want to watch this bloody $14 million extravaganza or Raimi’s shoestring original, which was Amateur Hour elevated to pop art?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Working in a mini-genre whose bones would appear to have been picked clean by the likes of Kevin Williamson and Wes Craven, Glosserman and Stieve find a few pints of fresh blood.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Villeneuve is trying like hell to elevate what turns out to be a dumb genre picture.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    "Three Kings" is fictional, obviously, and Mendes and Broyles were bound by the facts of Swofford's life. But the violence in "Three Kings" was visceral, whereas Jarhead's never penetrates the blood-brain barrier. It's locked away in its narrator's jarhead.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This one is a mess--a misshapen, mawkish tragicomedy bordering on self-parody. Its ambitions deserve respect, though.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie doesn't have any undercurrents, psychological or cinematic. -- The Blessed Mother ends up looking like a drunken housewife.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's the only Almodóvar movie in which feeling, emotional or sexual, doesn't suffuse the imagery and hold the ramshackle melodrama together.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Snow White comedy Mirror, Mirror turns out to be not that terrible - or maybe it's that the terrible first half hour wears you down so much that the rest seems relatively pleasant.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This slender, increasingly monotonous stalker plot feels ludicrously overintellectualized-full of hot air.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The action is bludgeoning. When Max gets pummeled by fists and lethal objects, we get pummeled by light and noise and rock-'em-sock-'em editing. No shrimp, though. As a narrative, "District 9" wasn't particularly original, either — in the end it was a standard conversion melodrama. But everything is better with shrimp.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The whole movie is like an NRA wet dream, with Robert Duvall as a crusty gun-range owner who pitches in to shoot bad guys. Jack Reacher already feels as if it belongs to another era.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is better than you've heard, although that's not saying a lot.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The scale of the enterprise is thrilling; it's too bad the movie is so muddled on so many different levels.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Some of that fun is infectious. For a while. Maybe 45 minutes. But when actors look as if they’re having a better time than you are, the buzz wears off fast. You turn into a wallflower at an especially obnoxious party.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If the staging were as witty as the plotting, Quantum of Solace might have been a corker like "Casino Royale." But when the action starts, art-house-refugee director Marc Forster (Monster’s Ball) mashes together close-ups in the manner of "The Dark Knight," and every big set piece is borderline incoherent.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Gomorrah isn't memorable. The structure feels random, and the characters remain at arm's length. Next to HBO's "The Wire," which depicted an enormous financial ladder and also brought to life the characters on every rung, the movie is small potatoes: excellent journalism, so-so art.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Watching this Pelham--a money job from its conception--you can believe that there's no other motivation on Earth.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As drama, Hilary and Jackie is merely sketchy and superficial. As a portrait of the artist, it's puritanical crap.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Although it's shot in lovely, dusty shades of brown with splashes of Coca-Cola red, John Hillcoat's Lawless is dead weight: listlessly classical and then bludgeoning.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The director's beautiful detachment suggests a kind of cowardice.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Travolta keeps you grooving even when the movie's motor runs down--although it has never revved too high to begin with.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    He's (Reeves) not as good as he was playing a menacing Georgia wife-beater in The Gift, but he's an awfully convincing jerk.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    With all the narration and fits of slow motion, the movie seems like the work of a nervous chain-smoker. It lacks concentration--and with it, the potential for rapture.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hopelessly amateurish, the troupe is saved by a remarkably pretty young blonde called Douce with a sweet soprano to match her angel face. The gifted, unknown actress-singer who plays her, Nora Arnezeder, also saves the movie, which would otherwise blur into a mass of droopy, mustached, big-honkered Gallic character actors.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As Brown becomes more flagrantly self-destructive and at the same time more deluded, you realize you're watching "Bad Lieutenant" made by a tediously finger-wagging Jew instead of a tediously desecrating Catholic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The performance is extraordinary, literally: Close resembles no man I've ever seen, or woman either. She's the personification of fear - the fear of being seen through, seen for what she is.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film would be better if it were gentler. It's broadly written and played, the actors too busy telegraphing their characters' emotions to let us contemplate their faces in peace.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie substitutes milky, washed-out color and funereal music for insight. The murders are purposely un-fluid: When you see Mohammad or Malvo take a shot, you don’t see the impact of the bullet. When you see the victim struck, you don’t see the shooter.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It will resonate with anyone who has ever buried a loved one and struggled to reconcile the myriad emotions--grief, anger, helplessness. Which is to say, everyone. And yet out of this premise comes glop. Departures needed a little more work in the morgue--like cutting to the bone.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It starts to feel less like a thriller than an actors’ workshop.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It has strong moments and fine, unsentimental performances, but it doesn't jell as a story.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Sour and mostly feeble, with a depressingly curdled worldview. It bears no resemblance to Allen's surreal, open-ended comedies.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's good enough that you forget how much better Brian De Palma could do it. The rest is a slow road to nowhere, less clunky than "The Interpreter" but bogged down by its own cynicism.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Works only in spurts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hit and miss, but its tone of lyric melancholy is remarkably sustained.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At its best, 25th Hour is a melancholy tone poem -- But the movie is also muddled by its own ambitions. There is simply no connection between the themes of Benioff's screenplay and 9/11, and every time Lee over-inflates the story, he loses its real pulse.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The final 10 minutes of Win A Date With Tad Hamilton! are likable: one cliché following another, but with charming restraint. Or it might just have been that the movie's simple-mindedness wore me down.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I know I'm going to bring down the room by saying I think it's just okay. Well, Jennifer Hudson is more than okay.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is the first big-studio action picture with some of the disgusted, bloody nihilism of the post-Vietnam era.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Without a character, he’s (Pitt) back to that soft, appraising, Robert Redford Jr. stare, his mouth half open as if he’s about to speak but plainly with nothing on his mind apart from, “This is what a movie star looks like without any lines.” The ghouls are having deeper thoughts.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The highest-gloss revenge porn imaginable. It’s hard to believe that so much visual elegance has been brought to bear on material so ugly, and yet the disjunction is intentional, and the film is all of a piece.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    "The Silence of the Lambs," was morbid but also a rich and satisfying serial-killer thriller—a cunning weave of the fairy tale, the forensic, and the fetishistic. Hannibal, on the other hand, is simply a fat slab of sadism.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If you're in the mood for a liberal message movie in which the only surprise is no surprise, American Violet is the ticket.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The picture has some fun slapstick set pieces and an inventively manic turn by Gibson.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The sheer novelty of the enterprise is probably why Once Upon a Time in the Midlands has gotten so many rave reviews when it's actually sort of … middling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The problem is that he — unlike most modern sci-fi directors, who throw so much CGI at you that they make miracles cheap — seems peculiarly stingy when it’s time to deliver.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    More entertaining than it needs to be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The director's knee-jerk anti-capitalism often sticks in my (white, well-fed) craw.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    What's a shock is the crudeness with which Spielberg fills the scenario in -- how he neuters his protagonist and short-circuits the inner workings of his human characters.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Good enough to make you wish it were better.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is a hodgepodge, and it closes with a whimper. But along the way some lucid voices slip through.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's about unruly passion, but it's icy and cerebral, and Robbins has become a disappointingly tentative actor, playing emotionally straitjacketed men in a self-imposed straitjacket.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Underwhelming.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It walks and talks and moves very fast, but it never lives.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If you want proof that Will Ferrell is the most riotously funny straight man since Jack Benny, observe the way his utter sincerity (in the Ralph Bellamy role, as Wendell’s rival for Eva Mendes) lifts this two-ton piece of whimsy into the stratosphere.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As a movie, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone has no inner life -- no pulse -- of its own: It's secondhand.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Zalla, a graduate of Columbia's film school, is talented and single-minded. He needs to lighten up, literally. He frames his characters to bring out all their sweaty desperation, and his palette is dark with splashes of muddy brown; even the street scenes look as if they were shot in a dungeon.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Pontypool doesn't jell--its pretensions way exceed its reach--yet it's madly suggestive, and it rekindled my affection for the genre.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Everything Is Illuminated is not a fiasco, but in some ways I'd have preferred a fiasco—something overreaching and inchoate instead of this self-consciously artistic mood piece.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Science of Sleep transports you, but it strands you, too. Apart from the time-machine bit and two or three other daft exchanges, Gondry’s scenes tend to circle around the same drain: the hero’s insufferable narcissism.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Anyone who has ever ended a relationship and taken long walks in the rain will relate, at least until the characters open their mouths.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The novelty wears off and the lack of imagination, visual and otherwise, turns into a drag. The Dark Knight is noisy, jumbled, and sadistic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Some people are finding it difficult to live with the idea that Kaleil could put his employees through hell, lose $60 million of other people's money, and wind up a movie star.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I like my God, though, like I like my comedies: ruder, cruder, and able to show me things I haven't seen before. Bruce Almighty is sadly miracle-free.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    To the Wonder feels like generalized woo-woo—and self-parody.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Bloated and often boring and has absolutely no reason to exist, but that it also hits its marks. No fanboy will pass it up. No studio head will lose his or her job.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Ender’s Game’s only lyrical presence is Breslin’s. The actress has a gentle soul. In the end, she’s the movie’s mascot, and its mournful spirit.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Sandler isn't afraid of plumbing his dark side, but Apatow fails him: Scenes of George's self-pity drag on too long, and as the character loses stature, Sandler recedes from his own vehicle. Rogen doesn't fill the vacuum.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The segments are essentially monodramas, so sketchily written that the big moments feel less like recognizable human behavior than recognizable screenwriter overreaching.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's depressing when the best thing you can say about a comedy is that its second-rateness is pleasantly in sync with its unmagnetic hero.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    From the start the jokes are on a different level than the last one: coarse, aggressive, and poorly timed by director Jay Roach.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Succeeds in dramatizing the resentment and guilt on all sides without just adding to the noise.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Steven Soderbergh is usually an inspired chameleon, perfectly suiting his style to his content. But The Good German is an ambitious miss...It's all very beautiful, high-minded, and remote.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The line between eeriness and tedium is fatally fluid.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Directed by David Zellner from a script he wrote with his brother, Nathan, the film has its tender mercies, as well-meaning Minnesotans attempt to reach out to this preoccupied Japanese woman with almost no English.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There’s a special kind of hell for artists who array vigilante revenge-porn in saintly garb, and Denzel Washington and director Antoine Fuqua should go to the front of that damnable line after The Equalizer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Gibson is better in the later scenes, when Walter tries to escape the Beaver's nefarious influence. And Gibson's never bad. It's just that we know how much is missing. As a raging nutcase, he's capable of so much more.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Unlike your average comic-book blockbuster, The Hulk isn't a bad cartoon. It's a bad modern Greek tragedy. It's a swing at the moon that looks (and smells) like green cheese.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Half inspired and half eye-rollingly terrible.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie would be more bearable without the unyielding score by Clint Mansell, which somehow melds the worst of Minimalism, art rock, and New Age music. It's what you'd hear if your massage therapist wanted to induce a stroke.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I wouldn’t believe that Run, Fat Boy, Run was co-written by Simon Pegg (of Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz) if he weren’t up there on the screen in teeny briefs and with his gut stuck out, trying to endear himself to the American audience in material maybe a notch above Rob Schneider’s.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    You could get high on this movie's technique, dizzy on its storytelling. Yet it's one of the most lucid bad trips ever made.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    In any case, the best performance is by Bridgette Wilson-Sampras as the conniving but peppy slut at the perfume counter. Her big scene--farcical, filthy, surprising--is also the best in the movie. Otherwise, Shopgirl is sadly vacuous, with a sadly vacuous center.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The Lords of Salem is gloomy, lacks variety, and is not without its flat patches. Heidi is an increasingly dullish heroine, and in the first 15 minutes you’ll know what’s going to happen in the next 80.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Say this for actors: Too self-centered to be embarrassed, they can be existential heroes of a (moronic) sort.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    W.
    W. isn't gripping enough as drama or witty enough as satire. It's neutered.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Those shots are in contrast to those landscapes, which are craggy, primordial. It’s meant to be a haunting combination, and I have colleagues who’ve found it just that, who came out of the movie ashen, devastated. But I found it bludgeoning — I think it gives new meaning to the phrase hammer of God.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Using R.E.M.'s impassioned "Everybody Hurts"--written by Michael Stipe after the suicide of Kurt Cobain--to underscore shots of Kidman and Ferrell feeling blue about their inability to pair off is an aesthetic crime. The Ephrons should be fined and forced to do a few hundred hours of community service.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I'd like to recommend it, but it's too silly. On the plus side, it's ravishingly well directed by Antonia Bird.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I hesitate to label the result as bad or good. It’s just … off.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Isn't bad as these things go, although these things go nowhere a healthy individual should want to. Having never claimed to be a healthy individual, I found it tolerable.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Oblivion is like that movie-within-a-movie: Everything in it feels 100 percent inauthentic. That vibe, as it happens, turns out to be intentional. But when the humans arrive, it’s still a narcotic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I've shot people for less.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The fact that the movie’s focus is how and why he renounced the world, moved to Cornish, New Hampshire, and stopped publishing makes it worse, somehow. Salerno probably didn’t mean it this way, but he gives you the impression he came to mock his subject: We’ve got you now, you antisocial bastard.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    A pretty good action flick -- twisty, marvelously acted, and energetically (if not always coherently) staged.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Full Frontal could not be more opaque. I honestly don't have a clue what it's about; it went completely over my head.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Gladiator's combination of grim sanctimony and drenching, Dolby-ized dismemberings left me appalled.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    As Willie Stark, Sean Penn demonstrates how a great Method actor can make the world’s most unconvincing rabble-rouser.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    A veritable orgy of immorality, each scene making the same point only more and more outrageously, the action edited with Scorsese's usual manic exuberance but to oh-so-monotonous effect.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The screenwriters go out of their way to prepare you for Taken 3: Serbedzija has more sons, and Kim's virginity is getting harder and harder to preserve.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    There isn't anything in this Total Recall to match the immortal Arnold Schwarzenegger send-offs, "See you at the pah-ty" and everyone's favorite alimony killer, "Consider this a divorce."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Actually, the whole movie is grim — drearily so.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's empty and formulaic, with plotting that's lazy even by stoner-comedy standards. Without all the yuck-o sight gags, it would be a huge bummer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The new Carrie isn’t atrocious — just flat and uninspired and compromised by the kind of mindless teen-movie “humanism” that De Palma so punkishly spat on.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The picture is an empty parlor trick, but it's carried out with a master's concentration.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The lesson of this is that there’s no easy way to dramatize the story of Julian Assange and that trying to turn it into a conventional melodrama is not just politically irresponsible but dull-witted.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's evidently important to Allen to work, work, work, but he's starting to make his movies by rote instead of passion. Could he handle -- psychologically -- a year or two off? Could he afford -- creatively -- to keep grinding them out?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Planet of the Apes has been designed and photographed (by Phillipe Rousselot) with real artistry, but in all the ways that matter it's hack work.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    As a film, it's overly tidy, and the surreal concentration-camp climax gave at least one viewer an inappropriate fit of giggles.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Love & Other Drugs is crazily uneven, jumping back and forth between jerk-off jokes and Parkinson's sufferers sharing their stories of hope. It's the sort of movie in which half the audience will be drying their eyes and the other half rolling them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The movie's themes are enormously resonant, which makes its doddering tastefulness that much more frustrating.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    You can see the potential, and you can also see the places where Allen didn't (couldn't?) rise to the occasion.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Michelle Pfeiffer is brittle in a way that's not especially French, but she's poignant and very lovely. Rupert Friend, on the other hand, is difficult to warm up to, especially with his features hidden behind all that hair. It's not a good sign when you have to take the movie's word for it that the lovers at its center are really, really into each other.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The elements of Precious are powerful and shocking, but the movie is programmed. It is its own study guide.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Luc Besson's Jumping Frog Action Factory looks mighty lame in Colombiana.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's written and directed by Kevin Smith--and hats off to him for being savvy enough to go for a piece of the Apatow action! Too bad he doesn't rise to the occasion.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Some of the gags do land — maybe one in four. But the genre-parody genre with big stars and poop jokes needs a little more class than MacFarlane is capable of providing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Robert Redford’s Lions for Lambs is the clunkiest, windiest, and roughest of the lot. Most of it is dead on the screen. But its earnestness is so naked that it exerts a strange pull. You have to admire a director who works so diligently to help us rise above all the bad karma.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    A movie about a man forced to stop thinking of himself as the center of the universe ends up feeling suffocatingly self-centered.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Seyfried (of Big Love and Mean Girls) is a radiant object and can sing, but I'd like to forget the others--especially Brosnan, whose singing is the best imitation I've heard of a water buffalo.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Travel--finding the self by escaping the self--is central to the novels of Eggers and Vida, but Mendes knows where he's going before he gets there. And so the subject of Away We Go turns out to be not travel but child-rearing, which is at best well-meaning and anguished and at worst downright monstrous.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Plays like an inflated Harlequin romance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    After a few minutes you know everything about Louis you’re going to know; the only surprise in Nightcrawler is the level of grotesqueness it achieves. There’s more insight (and entertainment) in an average sketch from the old SCTV series; I kept imagining Joe Flaherty’s horror host Count Floyd climbing out of his coffin and chanting, “Oooh, that Louis, he’s veh-ry skerrrr-y, kiddies — ahwoooooooo!”
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    A shapely, stylish, white-knuckle horror-thriller that hits its marks with blood and thunder. It stinks to heaven, too, but it isn't lame. The streets of Rome haven't run this red since the Inquisition.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    That first half of Admission is a lot for an actress to overcome. It’s not just very bad, it’s very fast, as if someone had overwound the metronome. Fairly naturalistic lines are delivered at the pace of screwball zingers — which stubbornly refuse to zing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The revulsion that Steven Spielberg maintained to the end of "Saving Private Ryan" is nowhere in sight — Ayer betrays his own values with a climax that’s like a hack gamer’s recreation of Peckinpah’s "The Wild Bunch." The final encounter between Ellison and a German soldier is meant to offer humanist balance, but in context it’s ludicrous. You can’t believe Ayer thought he could get away with it.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    8MM
    The moral contortions of 8MM seem especially bogus, a sadomasochistic peep show booth pretending to be a confessional.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    9
    For all the Saturday-matinee heroics, the movie is dreary and monotonous, the vision junky in more ways than one.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Foster’s feminist victimization complex seems to be looping around to meet Nixon and Agnew. Next she’ll be hunting Commies for the FBI.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The Australian actress Radha Mitchell is the only reason to see the movie: She has an extraordinary open face and a way of mixing dreaminess with sudden bursts of lacerating emotion that recalls Jessica Lange.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I found it tiresomely undramatic, even saccharine. Not to mention monotonous.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    One of the deadliest things I've ever sat through and which doesn't display someone's strange mind--only someone's predilection for sniggery camp.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I can't think of a movie this long that has left me so starved for a movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    In the golden turd that is Eat Pray Love, everyone helps Julia Roberts find herself so she can then experience true love.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It was probably hopeless from the start: The Warhol cosmos is too weird and complicated to lend itself to a conventional Hollywood biopic, and this one is conventional down to Warhol's first glimpse of his future "superstar" bouncing up and down vivaciously in tacky slow motion.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    This director is too calculating to hold our trust for long, and skepticism will kill transcendence every time.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    With a million times more computing power at its disposal than its 1982 predecessor, Tron: Legacy still looks like Disco Night at the jai alai fronton.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Had enough grit to scratch its way through my cynical defenses, at least until its grotesque ending. But that capper isn't an aberration -- it's the logical extension of the movie's grandiose ambitions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Every bit as dumb as August's "Conan the Barbarian" but awash in neon-lit nightscapes and existential dread, with killings so graphic that you can't entirely believe what you're gagging at.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Thanks to Hancock's evasive storytelling, it's never clear why Houston moved so slowly or why so few Texians came to the Alamo's aid. The middle of the movie is pokey and unfocused--and, given the circumstances, bizarrely lacking in urgency.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The most fluid, lyrical, and even-toned work of his (Burton's) career. It's also the most boring by a factor of 10.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Hannibal Rising is basically a Steven Seagal vigilante movie with a hero who eats the people he kills. At least it's ecofriendly.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The Camden 28 is slapdash: more talking heads, reunion footage with the mother reading from her own testimony, newscasts of the day. But the editing supplies some urgency, and the subjects remain radiant yet down-to-earth--too good-humored to be beatific.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Is Brad Pitt the worst actor on earth? The case could be made, and Meet Joe Black could serve as Exhibit A.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The cast comes off like a third-rate stock company on the matinee after the night on which everyone got bombed on mescal (and possibly mescaline).
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Perhaps the late Blake Edwards could have found a balance between slapstick and psychodrama, but Ron Howard can't get the pacing right, and Allan Loeb's script is even wordier than the one he wrote for "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Apart from Caroline Aaron's turn as Darin's overbearing sister...Beyond the Sea has nothing to recommend it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I can't recall another movie that cries out so incessantly for running commentary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The screenplay by Seth Grahame-Smith is witless and meandering, though the witlessness wouldn't matter so much if it moved, or the meandering if it were droll.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Howard and his writers are so in love with their own hip self-consciousness that it's a wonder they don't feature film critics discussing their movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    An agreeable time-killer, but I'll bet a couple of clever kids could make a livelier movie with a Woody puppet and a Predator doll.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The sequel to an influential eighties motion picture is so loaded with characters and crosscurrents that we wonder why it isn't a thirteen-hour cable mini-series instead of an impacted two-hour mess. The film is like my portfolio: full of promise, with minuscule returns.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Aside from a trio of witches that can hold its own with Eastwick’s in the dishiness department, Oz the Great and Powerful is a peculiarly joyless occasion.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Weitz’s pacing is so limp you’re going to need the electricity generated by a live audience to keep from yelling, “Hurry it up!”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Every unhappy movie is unhappy in its own way, and Joe Wright's Anna Karenina is as boldly original a miscalculation as any you're likely to see.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    If the movie were just these two (Costner/Hurt), bopping around arguing and offing people, it would have been better than the unholy mess it turns into.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I don't know if Howard had fun directing, writing, and starring in this thing; but he had to have gotten more masochistic pleasure out of it than the audience does.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Inception manages to be clunky and confusing on four separate levels of reality.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Suicidally insecure.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Crudely written, rife with clichés, and leaves out anything that would transform a piece of propaganda into a work of art akin to Samuel Fuller’s "The Steel Helmet," Brian DePalma’s "Casualties of War," or Steven Spielberg’s "Saving Private Ryan."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's tempting to praise The Ides of March as a realistic depiction of how low we've sunk. But that would mean accepting the second-rate writing and third-rate melodrama and incredible shrinking characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Most of the dialogue is listless, and no matter how much Soderbergh snips and stitches, the movie is a corpse with twitching limbs.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I found "Pearl Harbor" annoying but not excruciating—even at three hours, it's less assaultive than either "The Mummy Returns" or "Moulin Rouge."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Spring Breakers strikes me as another of Korine’s calculated punk outrages, a sploog in Disney’s direction.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The film is visually worked out to within an inch of its life, but after 15 minutes you can see where it's going, and along the way there are no surprises.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Wasikowska drabs herself down. Her body is undefined in dowdy clothes, her hair hangs limply. But her eyes usher you into her inner world, with its battle between girlish longing and the impatience to move on and be what she really is — whatever that might be. It’s a richer performance than the movie deserves.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Isn't a disaster, but after an entertaining start it congeals into something icky and fake, and it leaves you thinking that Spielberg and his team of screenwriters (Sacha Gervasi and Jeff Nathanson, from a story by Andrew Niccol and Gervasi) missed the real story.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The premise cries out for take-no-prisoners, Terry-Southern-style sick humor; it gets instead a lot of clunky, self-congratulatory in-jokes, and Pacino is left to ham in a vacuum.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Too bloated with its own significance to deliver the requisite thrills.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Less a rounded narrative than a pair of suggestive -- and unresolved -- exercises.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It was undoubtedly a great experience for everyone involved, and the show itself might have been a romp. But as a movie, Vince Vaughn’s Wild West Comedy Show makes you think of the days in which troupes that didn’t deliver were run out of town, bullets pinging off their heels.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    This is yet another of Soderbergh’s “exercises in style,” which means he has one big idea and sticks to it. He makes the space shallow and ugly (faces are bathed in orange) and adds groovy sixties titles and Marvin Hamlisch music.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    An unholy mixture of the banal and the bombastic.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    As you watch the nannies mistreated and the children left to cry themselves to sleep, the only surprise is that there are no surprises. It’s zombie-land.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I bet that what Carrey saw from inside Kaufman's head would be more illuminating than anything in the movie.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It appears that the filmmakers have taken Hannah Arendt's notion of the "banality of evil" way too literally.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    There isn't a mummy at the center of The Mummy, exactly, but a mutating Industrial Light and Magic Special Effect.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The period thriller Gangster Squad plays like an untalented 12-year-old's imitation of Brian DePalma's "The Untouchables."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    What I can't accept is that the stringy, insipidly earnest teen idol Zac Efron would grow up to be the defensively ironic, twisty-faced Matthew Perry.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The film will be huge. It’s busy. It’s kinetic. It’s a treat for kids. But like much of Seinfeld’s work outside his TV show, it’s impersonal. It doesn’t come from anywhere interesting.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    So vanilla yet so transcendentally sleazy that its target audience seems to be pubescent girls and dirty old priests.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Dull-witted.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The only reason to put yourself through Guy Ritchie's overblown, inelegant Sherlock Holmes: Game of Shadows is to see Jared Harris, who plays Professor Moriarty, in a chilling low key.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    This is the first bad movie that has ever made me call for a sequel - to get it all right.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    With McG's migraine-inducing jerky-cam and monochromatic palette (livened only by splotches of rust), Terminator Salvation puts the numb in numskull.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    A piece of exploitive schlock.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I Origins really loses its oomph when Ian travels to India in search of a particular pair of eyeballs, and the movie closes on a note that would make even M. Night Shyamalan roll his own.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    But Besson — by no means a bad filmmaker — has gotten rich off that kind of violence that upsets no one, least of all jaded international action audiences. He tries to have it both ways and fails some of cinema’s most precious resources.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Such a clunkerama that it made me rethink all the nice things I wrote about its predecessor, "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe." Could the same people have made both films?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    A derivative horror picture that somehow rises to the level of a primal scream. The premise is simple, by which I mean both easy to understand and feeble-minded.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Revolutions isn't as stupefying as "Reloaded"--and, of course, our expectations have been drastically lowered. But it's an abysmal anticlimax all the same.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Caruso is a much more resourceful director than this material deserves, but I resented being two steps ahead of the genius profiler and the genius serial-killer.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    You couldn't ask for a better pair of wild eyes than Jackson's.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    By the third big climax the audience started to get impatient with the movie's pointless zigs and zags.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It skips lightly over the surface of its rich material, more preoccupied with making pretty pictures than dipping below the surface so that you can experience the world through the eyes of its traumatized, yet increasingly savvy, heroine.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Evan Almighty runs out of comic invention early, and the filmmakers fall back on what real politicians do when they exhaust their small stash of ideas: brainless piety.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The film turns into one of those indie parades of eccentrics that are hit-and-miss but mostly miss.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The doughy Damon and aristocratic Blunt don't match up physically, and they never get any Hepburn-Tracy rhythms going that might create some current.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Woo could end up becoming the John Ford of schmaltz.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's heartbreaking how rich this failed project is, with enough poetry for several great movies, but not enough push for one.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The movie is a peculiar and unsatisfying hybrid--but above all it's a pedestal to its popular leading man, Ben Stiller.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Insurgent is not a very good movie, but it’s better than it needs to be.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Nearly three %$^&%!!# hours, and they’re brain-freezing.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Enjoyable in patches, but only because of the goodwill that most of us still have toward Sandra Bullock.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Most thriller writers don’t aim so high: You really have to grapple with Lehane’s vision to see how tiresome it is.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The Situation is, to put it kindly, a spotty piece of work. The script is by Wendell Steavenson, a reporter who seems to know everything about Iraq and next to nothing about screenwriting. The dialogue is flat, and the actors almost never rise above it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's also rather tawdry. The climax is as ludicrous as any Jack Bauer adventure, and Greengrass is always on shaky ground. Literally.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The film features plot turns of howling implausibility, leading up to a mechanical climax that resolves the story without forcing either of the principal characters to make the uncommercial decision to blow the other away.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's too bad J. Edgar is so shapeless and turgid and ham-handed, so rich in bad lines and worse readings. Not DiCaprio, though.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Takes off into the comic stratosphere in its first sequence and then slowly sinks to Earth, made logy by its noble means and Sayles' increasing inability to shoot anything but fat clots of undramatic talk in the most boring manner imaginable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The strands in High Crimes don't coalesce. Those red herrings somehow take over the picture; the thing itself turns into a giant red herring.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Begins too cruelly and ends too sappily but holds you somewhere between the two extremes until the semisweet finale.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The credits had just started and I was already looking for a barf bag.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    Bizarrely depressing.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    9 Songs could have been "Last Rock Show in London." Unfortunately, it's stupefyingly dull, even with good music and at the short but resonant length of 69 minutes.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    Jumper is so in sync with the language of modern action movies that it’s possible to look past its soullessness and go with the quantum flow.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    This is an extraordinary -- and unfathomable -- piece of whitewashing: a true snow job.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    A depressing comeback for Jane Fonda, but it's still nice to see her in movies again, and in something that isn't dripping with self-actualizing virtue like her last projects.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    Emminently skippable.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    The final illuminations (people have demons, a mind is a terrible thing to lose) are a poor return on nearly two hours of ear-buckling, eye-stabbing incoherence.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    And you wait--and wait--for the magic of movies.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    A well-polished cowpat that will confuse and bore those who know nothing about Shakespeare and incense those who know almost anything.

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