For 860 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Queen
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 60 out of 860
860 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Fiennes and Logan haven't made a definitive Coriolanus, but they've made a sensationally gripping one. They have the pulse of the play, its firm martial beats and its messy political clatter. They tell a damn good story.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie doesn't quite jell, but you'll feel its sting for hours.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Meehl, in her directing debut, is attuned to the rhythms of Buck, who's attuned to the horses.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Nichols has a genius for making landscapes and everyday objects resonate like crazy, for nailing the texture of dread.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    In Mysteries of Lisbon, the prolific Chilean-born director and egghead Raúl Ruiz has achieved something remarkable, at once avant-garde and middlebrow: the apotheosis of the soap opera.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    What makes it so good is that no one is bad. These humans, desperate to do right, are caught up in a perfect storm of inhumanity. The evil is in the ecosystem.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Joel and Ethan Coen’s Inside Llewyn Davis is an exquisitely crafted tale of woe with heartfelt early-sixties folk music — and an overarching snottiness.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    In totalitarian societies, artists have found all sorts of ways - some brilliantly imaginative - to disguise their political protest, but Panahi has no subterfuges left. This Is Not a Film ends with a whimper that is a bang. He must be freed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    No actor is as brilliant, or as cunning, as Denzel Washington at portraying superhuman coolness and the scary prospect of its loss.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    You could never call Solondz a humanist, but he achieves something I've never seen elsewhere: compassionate revulsion.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Downey found a way to channel his working-class audience’s anger against liberal shibboleths and not incidentally take down both his dad and his surrogate dad — Teddy ­Kennedy. It’s a ­riveting Oedipal tragedy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Lincoln is too sharply focused to deserve the pejorative "biopic" label. It's splendid enough to make me wish Spielberg would make a "prequel" to this instead of another Indiana Jones picture.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    In his late seventies, Robert Redford has never held the camera as magnificently as he does in the survival-at-sea thriller All Is Lost.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie’s singular acting triumph is Nathan Fillion’s Constable Dogberry, one of Shakespeare’s simpler buffoons made poetic by understatement. Fillion speaks softly, with ­uninflected sincerity, a brilliant departure from the standard gregarious-­hambone Dogberry. It’s his insularity — his imperviousness to the interjections of more observant people — that makes him such a touchingly credible clown.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    So Polley has gone meta — exuberantly, entertainingly, with all her heart.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie is gorgeous, mesmerizing, poetic; the lyricism actually heightened by harsh jets of gore.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The resulting film is bizarre to the point of ­trippiness, yet it’s one of the most lucid portraits of evil I’ve ever seen.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie is a triumph of an especially satisfying kind. It arrives at a kind of gnarled grace that’s true to this sorry old man and the family he let down in so many ways.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Her
    In Her, Jonze transforms his music-video aesthetic into something magically personal. The montages — silent, flickering inserts of Theodore and his ex-wife recollected in tranquility — are sublime.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie goes on for three hours without an emotional letup — it’s finally overwhelming.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Hot-dog Hong Kong action stylist Johnnie To has never achieved the cult status of John Woo in this country, but his explosively entertaining — and startlingly splattery — Drug War should win him new fans.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    With her swanlike neck and ever-flushing complexion, Felicity Jones has a perfect nineteenth-century look, but there’s something forward and modern about her physiognomy, her huge eyes and strong nose and overbite. As she gazes down in enforced modesty, you feel her soul about to burst. The performance is startlingly vivid.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    I’m not crying “masterpiece” here. Locke is too contained, too well-carpentered, too self-consciously “classical.” But tours don’t come much more forceful. Once you’ve taken this 90-odd-minute drive with Tom Hardy, you’ll never forget his face.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Wes Anderson’s latest cinematic styling is The Grand Budapest Hotel, an exquisitely calibrated, deadpan-comic miniature that expands in the mind and becomes richer and more tragic.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Abrams and his writers (Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman) have come up with a way to make you dig the souped-up new scenery while pining for the familiar--a good thing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Even more than his other genre mash-ups, this is a switchback journey through Tarantino’s twisted inner landscape, where cinema and history, misogyny and feminism, sadism and romanticism collide and split and re-bond in bizarre new hybrids. The movie is an ungainly pastiche, yet on some wacked-out Jungian level it’s all of a piece.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    For all the artfulness, the feel of the film is rough-hewn, almost primitive. It’s a fabulous tree house of a movie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The actors playing parents and spouses (among them Steve Buscemi, Halley Feiffer, Portia, and Kevin Hagan) are stunningly believable. I'm not sure how Morton made sense of her character's ebbs and flows, but I never doubted her. She's a mariner in uncharted seas of emotion.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    One job of memoir is to show the world through another's eyes and inspire you to live more alertly, and that is the glory of The Beaches of Agnès.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    His palette here is deep-toned, with bottomless blacks and supersaturated oranges and blues--as if the Walt Disney of "Pinocchio" had collaborated with Goya.