David Edelstein

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For 1,939 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Waltz with Bashir
Lowest review score: 0 Movie 43
Score distribution:
1939 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The film is stunningly bleak and staggeringly violent. Major characters go down in showers of blood and gore. I’ve seen worse and so, probably, have you, but never from such an essentially wholesome corporate enterprise with a target audience so young and hopeful.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Get Out is a ludicrous paranoid fantasy, but that doesn’t mean it’s not alive in the unconscious. Having it out there in so delightful a form helps us laugh at it together — and maybe later, when we’ve thought it over, shudder.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The absurdity is what makes it such a hoot-and-a-half.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    For a movie so visual (how many shades of blue can you count?), John Wick: Chapter 2 has quite a clever script. Derek Kolstad anchors that abstract action with good, spiky passages of dialogue.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    People are calling Fifty Shades Darker the worst movie ever made, but it’s really not that terrible. It does, however, misrepresent itself, which is true of most mainstream American films about sex. The movie’s real subject is wealth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The last hour is like a night at the comedy club after the headliners have left and the room has the smell of stale beer and flop sweat.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    All I can is that I didn’t draw too many breaths during the last half hour.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Raoul Peck’s driving, free-form documentary I Am Not Your Negro is not a direct response to Donald Trump’s delighted recognition of the lone nonwhite face he saw at one of his rallies: “Look at my African-American over here!” But the movie feels, if anything, even timelier, which is to say, timeless.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    My loathing of Split goes beyond its derivative ideas and second-hand parts.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Once Affleck’s Joe gets to Florida, Live by Night loses its pulse and you’re left with a lot of pale characters, secondhand plotting, and maybe second thoughts about the daffy idea of a liberal-humanist gang boss.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Michael Keaton is sensational as Kroc.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    I’ve never seen a film that captures the inner world of an artist with such delicacy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s not cinematic enough to make you forget you’re watching something conceived for another, more spatially constricted medium, but it’s too cinematic to capture the intensity, the concentration, of a great theatrical event.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    20th Century Women is irreducible, too, although certain adjectives and adverbs do leap to mind: generous, reflective, absolutely delightful.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The German comedy Toni Erdmann makes the best case imaginable for the importance of tone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie is impressive.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Only a corporate entity could deliver an ending like this one. But only humans could devise and enact the often delightful scenario that precedes it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie didn’t rekindle the thrill of seeing, say, The Empire Strikes Back, but Rogue One will loom pretty large in the Star Wars galaxy — if only because there’s so little competition.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The actors carry the music in their gait, their gestures, the rhythms of their speech, so that their singing and dancing is a small but exquisite step up from the way that they normally talk and walk. To rhapsodize about La La Land is to complete the experience. You want to sing its praises, literally.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Jackie is a hard movie to love, but its brittleness might be its most admirable quality.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Beatty is trying to elevate the material while at the same time draining it of energy. The movie is so misbegotten that it’s almost poignant. But I hope Beatty has a few more left in him.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    With Allied, Robert Zemeckis has fashioned a good old-fashioned World War II romantic espionage movie, but that wouldn’t matter a damn if the leads weren’t beautiful and didn’t look great in period clothes. They are and they do.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The movie might pass muster for kids weaned on the Harry Potter films — I shudder to think of the movies that pleased me when I was 7 or 8 — and uncritical critics. But you’d have to be desperate for another Potter fix to think this is magical entertainment. It’s thoroughly No-Maj.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The main problem with Lee’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk is superficial, literally. Lee has opted for the rare 120-frames-per-second format, allegedly because he thought it would deepen our connection to the characters. He thought wrong.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It’s the damnedest thing how the longueurs of Loving have such a cumulative power. I was still crying as the credits ended.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Why did Villeneuve and the screenwriter, Eric Heisserer, let the grade-B military melodrama run away with the story?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    This is a rare case in which Marvel has freed a director’s imagination instead of straitjacketing it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Say what you will about Mad Mel Gibson, he’s a driven, febrile artist, and there isn’t a second in his war film Hacksaw Ridge — not even the ones that should register as clichés — that doesn’t burn with his peculiar intensity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I still don’t know how a gore-meister like Park Chan-wook could have made the year’s most irresistible romance. Maybe it’s that he hates oppression — chauvinist, colonialist, Sadean — so deeply that in hoisting his old boys on their own petards, he has discovered the wellsprings of love.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Tom Hanks takes his art down a peg with another paycheck performance as the dramatic cipher Robert Langdon in Inferno, Ron Howard’s mostly lame adaptation of Dan Brown’s wholly lame novel.

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