David Edelstein

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For 1,855 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Winter's Bone
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
1855 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    As cheap as the whole set-up is, the actors make wonderful music together - even if there's not much left of Eastwood's vocal cords except a handful of dust.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A thriller of serpentine excitement all the way up to that dud of a climax.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    She lip-syncs convincingly to Piaf's songs. Even when she overacts like mad, she makes you think she’s Piaf overacting like mad--the little sparrow with the foghorn pipes.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Full Throttle is full-throttle camp: It's like a third-rate Austin Powers picture cut to the whacking, attention-deficit-disorder tempo of "Moulin Rouge."
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Parts of The Brothers Grimsby are very funny.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The best part is Jemaine Clement as Benjamin’s grandiose genre hero, Dr. Ronald Chevalier. Even if you love him on "Flight of the Conchords," you’ll be unprepared for his genius--and charisma.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A too-pat but very funny comedy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The film is seamlessly made, its mood balanced dreamily between sexy-funny and sexy-scary.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Genius does a pretty good job of capturing the peculiar drama of the relationship between editors and writers, in this case some of the most revered in American letters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie isn't a dud: It has exuberant bits and breathtaking (money money money) effects. But it's supposed to be fun and inspirational, and it's too leaden for liftoff.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    But even with bits that are crazily inspired, Forgetting Sarah Marshall is depressing. The Apatow Factory is too comfy with its workers’ arrested development to move the boundary posts. If they could find scripts by female writers that dramatize the other side of the Great Sexual Divide, it might be a place of joy--and embarrassed recognition--for everyone.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The first truly countercultural apocalypse fantasy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s not cinematic enough to make you forget you’re watching something conceived for another, more spatially constricted medium, but it’s too cinematic to capture the intensity, the concentration, of a great theatrical event.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Pure misery.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Fascinating for the issues--ethical, aesthetic, psychoanalytic--it raises. But it doesn't fully come together.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s the writer, Diablo Cody, and the director, Jason Reitman, who have screws loose. Or maybe they’re just desperate to make their film a chick "Rushmore" or "Garden State."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The film is superbly acted (especially by Macdissi, who makes the father a borderline hysteric), but it's hard to know what to feel except, "How can any girl navigate this oversexualized culture?"
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Baldwin is so good in the coming-of-age gangster drama Brooklyn Rules that it's like watching a voodoo priest.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie is sweet but deeply suspect: It's like "Lost Horizon" re-imagined by a realtor.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The Sitter feels slapdash and quick, but you might not want to have it any other way.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A simple, chronological history, narrated with melancholy gravitas by Morgan Freeman.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's a daring and original effort, yet so noncommittal--so purposely vague--that it's apt to leave you flummoxed: at once stricken and etherized.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I’m not sure Morris clinches his case, but I’m not sure he wants to: His aim is to throw a monkey wrench into the cogs of our perception.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Fearless as these racers are, it's hard to muster enthusiasm for a movie that plays chicken and then swerves about a mile before the collision.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I must admit that I find those motifs -- and the Farrellys' universe in general -- more sweet than offensive, and I liked Say It Isn't So just so. So there.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Rambling and conflicted as it is, it's one of the most entertaining African-American comedies of manners ever made.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Garry Shandling is poignant and hilarious as an alien stud.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I think of Waitress as an overstuffed, overcooked pie--too ungainly to eat all of, too generous to pass up, too heartbreaking to contemplate for long.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Attains a level of quiet grace. It's too bad that I can barely remember the movie after only a week. Nothing lasts, indeed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    At least the movie never bogs down. But you only get a taste of what made the Clash for a brief period the most exciting band on that side of the Atlantic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Better approached as an “oooooh” and “awww” fest.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Most of the movie works because the blonde Weixler has a darling-daffy face (a pinch of Alicia Silverstone, a dollop of Drew Barrymore) and a should-I-or-shouldn’t-I ambivalence about sex that’s part realism, part screwball.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Miss Potter hardly deserves ridicule. It's sweet with lovely Lake District vistas and a heartfelt endorsement of land conservation. It will certainly play well with older audiences and the kind of adolescent girls who draw faces in their O's.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The film has one indelible asset: Mark Strong, who plays the Jordanian spymaster Hani. He's sleek and lounge-lizard sharp like a young Andy Garcia, and he could be bigger than Garcia. The Jordanian holds all the cards, and opposite two superstars, Strong is the only actor who holds the camera.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    There's no wonder or elation or even dopy sincerity here - just a high level of proficiency and, yes, a lot of expensive CGI.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s another in a long, honorable line of films that chart the poisonous effects of colonialism on indigenous populations and their ecosystems, but with an unusually invigorating perspective, like a reverse-angle "Heart of Darkness."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The best way to think of Captain America: Civil War is as a toy box in which the sheer quantity of toys partly makes up for the lack of anything new. But the big takeaway is worrisome. Marvel has created a universe teeming with superheroes who simply don’t have enough to do. They’re all suited up with nowhere to go.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's almost criminal the way the central relationship of High Fidelity has been left such a void.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Duplicity is deeply shallow--cheap reversals all the way down. But it's a passably amusing brainteaser.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's a tough, beautifully judged performance (Davis) - it gives this too-soft movie a spine.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I like — as always — what Chandor attempts: not just to denounce capitalism but to explain in detail how people go wrong. But the overcomposed, sedate A Most Violent Year lacks the one thing it most needs: violence.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Stone is so intent on making Snowden an icon that he scrubs him of his nuances, his individuality.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Only a corporate entity could deliver an ending like this one. But only humans could devise and enact the often delightful scenario that precedes it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Even with her stinko lines, Weaver has never been as flabbergastingly gorgeous and charismatic. She's tall and lean and meteor-hard, and you can almost believe there's really acid in her blood, and that no alien in its right mind would mess with her.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    If The Theory of Everything cut as deeply as Redmayne's performance, it might be on the level of "My Left Foot." But there are so damn many problems, easy to ignore at first in the elation of watching Redmayne and the gossamer Felicity Jones as his future wife, Jane, but impossible to shake off in the last third.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Selick has a great fantasy filmmaker's artistry, but he lacks that overflowing Geppetto-esque love that brings puppets to life. In Coraline, he's woozy with his own lyricism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    There's something too refined and emotionally neutral about Nowhere in Africa, as if Link had directed with white gloves. Maybe she knew how loaded this African-Jewish subject was and didn't want it push it too hard. Maybe that's why she won an Oscar.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    What a shock when George Lucas finds his footing and the saga once again takes hold.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A labor of love that sometimes wears its love too laboriously, but a surfeit of rapture isn’t the worst thing in a movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie is charming even when it’s stilted, and it’s often stilted.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s Aronofsky’s least personal work. So you get a fat dose of conventional melodrama with your Old Testament: It’s the antediluvian "Gladiator."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    When the film shifts to Shanghai and the club Casablanca, there's too much lustrous-hued loitering and too few martial­-arts set pieces.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    City of Men is clunky and often contrived, but there’s something haunting about fatherless boys in a blighted place fumbling to teach themselves what it means to be a man.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Movies are the lesser medium for Fey and Carell. They’re the stars of two relatively sophisticated, media-savvy network sitcoms, yet their big-screen comedies are retro.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Occasionally dissonant, but it's remarkably cleareyed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    This seesaw of shame and self-justification might not speak for the most murderous segment of the German populace, but it's a peculiarly eloquent representation of the silent, obedient majority.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    This could be the premise of a zany comedy, but the mood of The Future is, from the outset, defeatist - annoyingly defeatist, to be frank.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I found the film -- excruciatingly flat-footed, with one of the most exasperating scores (by Philip Glass) ever written. The most fascinating thing in the movie is a nose.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's true that the movie, arrested between documentary and drama, doesn't quite do justice to either medium: The actors playing Joe and Simon don't have anything like "lines" to simulate "drama," or even just "conversation," while the real guys often fall back on bland English understatement.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Elektra isn't half-bad--only maybe two-fifths.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Sutton finds the lyrical tension in torpor; he shows how Willis’s artistic vacuum isn’t a passive thing, how it eats into him, how it even permeates the natural world.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Once Affleck’s Joe gets to Florida, Live by Night loses its pulse and you’re left with a lot of pale characters, secondhand plotting, and maybe second thoughts about the daffy idea of a liberal-humanist gang boss.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    After an electrifyingly feral opening, the movie settles down into a cogent courtroom drama, with no real cinematic highs but no jaw-dropping lows, either.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Brokeback Mountain could use a little more of it--by which I mean more sweat and other bodily fluids. Ang Lee's formalism is so extreme that it's often laughable, and the sex is depicted as a holy union: Gay love has never been so sacred.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Spike Lee is a virtuoso filmmaker, a wizard at selling a sequence, but he'll never make an entirely coherent movie until he learns to go deeper into his subjects instead of wider with them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Hanks and Zemeckis (and writer William Broyles Jr.) are so intent on making an epic of the spirit that they can't bring themselves to acknowledge the comic, narcissistic side of their desert island fantasy. And so on simple, human terms, the picture gets all gummed up.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There are times when Dafoe's accent strays into Billy Crystal Yiddish, but the notion of Vlad the Impaler aging into a finicky old Jew has its own kind of piquancy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Blue Ruin is more artful and evocative than any recent revenge picture, but it’s still drivel.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The thing is scary as hell when it's all creaks and thumps and doors swinging open. Then come the explanations, the special effects, and the inevitable feeling of been-there-been-­bombarded-by-that.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In patches it's agreeably lurid, but it's otherwise ho-hum.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Beatty is trying to elevate the material while at the same time draining it of energy. The movie is so misbegotten that it’s almost poignant. But I hope Beatty has a few more left in him.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Bier dramatizes our ambivalence so earnestly that it's tempting to give her awards rather than admit that the movie is a crushing bore.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is based on a novel by Susan Minot--one of those books where the author doesn't deign to put dialogue in quotation marks for fear of dispelling the dreamlike mood. It works on paper, but Minot, who shares credit for the adaptation with fellow novelist Michael Cunningham, doesn't understand that screenwriting is the art of taking away.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's hard to get past the primitiveness of Allen’s fantasies.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Spiderwick. There’s nothing wrong with it that passion and personality couldn’t fix.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is sometimes gentle to the point of blandness, but it's never flimsy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    An unusually powerful mess, a broad satire of suburban self-indulgence with little in the way of a consistent style, and with a character who's serious business: a convicted child molester.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is repetitive, top-heavy: Wright blows his wad too early. But a different lead might have kept you laughing and engaged.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I was all revved up to have a whale of a fascist good time, and S.W.A.T. left me let down and pissed-off.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Am I the only one who finds the substance of this movie repulsive?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Life After Beth is a reasonably fun, medium-gory horror comedy that’s better before the innards hit the fan.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Law gives a doozy of a performance: He's fond of bulging his eyes, curling his head like a gargoyle, and displaying a set of rotten yellow teeth. This is some of the most flamboyantly bad acting since Brad Pitt in "Twelve Monkeys" (1995). An Oscar nomination would appear inevitable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The middling romantic comedy Smart People, which centers on a hyperintellectual dysfunctional family, is of interest chiefly for the first post-Juno role of Ellen Page.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Like a lot of Gilliam's movies it's too overloaded--antic, indulgent, overdesigned--to get off the ground for more than a minute or two at a stretch.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Love it or laugh at it, you will gaze on Southland Tales with awe.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's fascinating trying to separate the thirties material from the mostly maladroit additions.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If you can stay awake, you'll see a performance by ­Keaton that is radiant in its simplicity, all ditheriness shaken off. She's still ­peaking - ­someone give her a great role.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    What saves Zatoichi is that it ends -- for no clear reason -- with a foot-stomping ensemble dance number that is both delightful and unhinging: It sends you home with spasmodic giggles, convinced this Japanese imp has discovered a new path to your unconscious.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Except for a screamingly funny climax in which he attempts to kidnap Pamela Anderson (who reportedly wasn't in on the joke), I found the Borat feature (directed by Larry Charles, who does similar duties on "Curb Your Enthusiasm") depressing; and the paroxysms of the audience reinforced the feeling that I was watching a bearbaiting or pigsticking.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    He does gorgeous work, but in Mission to Mars he's only going through the motions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Pacific Rim made me marvel at the technology of movies, but never the magic of them.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film has no spirit of inquiry -- no spirit at all, really.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Recruit is like vaudeville night at Bellevue.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    McKellen's actions are queerly unpredictable (pun intended), but every plot other twist is portentously foreshadowed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I think Levinson missed a chance to get something unique and audacious on screen.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Weds an epic, sometimes visionary, depiction of the afterlife to a script and story with fewer psychological layers than the average Hallmark card.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    To be fair, some of it is good, very good. Jersey Boys has an easy, likable gait. It’s Eastwood’s most fluid film: He gets the swing of the music without fancy editing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Evocative as it is, The Road comes up short, not because it’s bleak but because it’s monotonous.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The visuals have so much intrinsic motion that it's too bad Robots is oppressively rollercoasterish.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Burn After Reading is untranscendent, a little tired, the first Coen brothers picture on autopilot. In the words of the CIA superior, it’s "no biggie."
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hong Kong action fans hoping for spontaneous combustion from the American debut of superstar Chow Yun-Fat might want to turn their weapons on the producers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie has grand (and Grand Guignol) bits and pieces, but despite the hype it’s no big deal. By horror standards, the premise isn’t especially outlandish.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    About Time is like a sermon that starts with a few good jokes and ends with tremulous exhortations to live, live.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It has a gritty feel and a tight, methodical, one-thing-after-another tempo.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Directed by Bryan Singer in a break from his gayish superhero movies, it's a low-key procedural with a dollop of suspense--although perhaps not enough to make up for the foregone conclusion.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If "Psycho" and "Peeping Tom" are the seminal killer-as-voyeur movies, Vacancy is the nasty little runt offspring with no other purpose in life but to gnaw on you.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It starts off with a flourish and winds up limp, like a rabbit pulled out of a hat that turns out to be dead.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is a polished muddle, fitfully amusing but with no spine.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The 61-year-old Stallone would deserve a measure of respect for pulling Rambo off, appalling as it is, but this Fangoria-worthy circus of horrors also features footage of actual Burmese atrocities.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is overnarrated and in spots overwritten, but Brooks, who's primarily a screenwriter, does well with actors, and he has coaxed an extraordinary performance out of the young Jordana Brewster.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hereafter occupies some muzzy twilight zone, too woo-woo sentimental to be real, too limp to make for even a halfway decent ghost story.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Roach is too stiff a director to give Ferrell room to romp. Bits like the one in which he's challenged to recite "The Lord's Prayer" needed extra zigs and zags instead of variations on the same joke. A looser director like Adam McKay (Step Brothers) might have created a happier climate for improv.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Juicy, revved-up, semi-satisfying biopic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Often plays like what it is: a clunky toga-and-sandals picture, with Hollywood compromises abounding.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Coarse and chaotic remake.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Doesn't really work but has a good cast and great craggy ocean-framed scenery.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I'd have a lot more respect for Scott if he were actually the virtuoso he pretends to be. "Gladiator" had lousy, disjunctive action, and Kingdom of Heaven is even more maladroit.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film becomes an aria of agony--but with a rousingly yucko finish!
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is not to say that it is bad writing, shooting, or acting: It would need to be more ambitious to be bad. It is simply the most mundane sort of behavior presented in the most mundane sort of way.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The tit-for-tat scenario ought to be wildly entertaining, but the magic is crude, the characters flyweight, and the story protracted and unpleasant.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Denzel Washington is so powerfully earnest an actor that you never want to laugh at him -- even when you ought to be in stitches.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In LaBute's movies, people are either clueless dupes or psychotic manipulators, while art is meant to rub your face in unpleasant "truths." And I think he takes a little too much pleasure in that nose-rubbing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Thoroughly second-rate -- which is to say that it waddles when it ought to whiz, clanks when it strives for cornball poetry, and transforms its august stars into something akin to a manic dinner-theater troupe.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A climactic twist that's among the stupidest I've ever seen-almost up there with another Costner movie, "No Way Out," and "The Life of David Gale."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The grandeur of the Lord of the Rings trilogy [has] been replaced by something that resembles tatty summer-stock theater.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I hope that in Part 2, Yates and screenwriter Steve Kloves give Fiennes a better send-off than Dame J.K. did in her less-than-wizardly climactic wandathon. Having made us sit through two and a half hours with no payoff, they'd better not go all Muggle on us. Next time, we want magic, people.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It more or less works.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    No mainstream filmmaker since Orson Welles can touch Steven Spielberg when it comes to camera movement and composition--or, more precisely, to composition that gets more vivid as the camera moves...It's the work of a man with film storytelling in his blood. What a bummer when the story he has to tell is a cosmic nothing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I enjoyed this piece of southern-fried screwball Gothic whimsy (with jolts of CGI spell-casting for the multiplex crowd) so much that I’m sad to admit that it’s nowhere near as potent as "Twilight."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A brisk feminist melodrama that is, historically speaking, a load of wank. It has the feel of a game of “telephone,” in which information is progressively mangled.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Swinton is good enough to take your mind off the not-too-compelling ambiguities.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At times, you could actually mistake Tears of the Sun for a blunt modern parable instead of an opportunistic mixture of up-to-the-minute atrocities and old-fashioned corn.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I wish the movie had more of a tragic undercurrent — the tone is wobbly.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If there’s a sure thing in movies, it’s that if you cast Nicolas Cage in a role in which he goes crazy, he’ll rise to the occasion and keep on rising until he seems even loonier than his character.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The first hour is evocative and creepy...But once the trajectory is clear and the squeamish New York intellectual Quaid has to stand up and fight for his homestead, the boringness seeps into you like the damp.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is ho-hum, straight-to-video material. And yet, even at its most crawlingly linear, Jackie Brown is diverting. If nothing else, I was diverted by the director's gall at stretching out those vacuous scenes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Inland Empire is way, way beyond my powers of ratiocination. It's the higher math.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Brutally exciting and sometimes brutally inept.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The parents are the casualties of Mills' misplaced sincerity, which makes Thumbsucker the quintessential misadapted head-scratcher.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    You have to admire a movie that endeavors to moosh together every successful cross-cultural action picture ever made.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Here, the material is already melodramatic — the characters are at the mercy of seismic forces — and Cianfrance’s direction comes off as wildly overwrought.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie becomes more and more lugubrious, finally ending on a note of high-tragic operatic bathos.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is a bleak, unresolved film, with no release. What keeps it from being a mortal bummer is the music-exquisite sacred choral works, plus Mozart.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is too metronomically paced for Kilmer's routines to develop any rhythm. The direction by Phillip Noyce is fluid but impersonal. Endless studio tinkering seems to have dissolved its spine.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Fifty Shades of Grey is nowhere near as laughable as you might have feared (or perversely hoped for): It’s elegantly made, and Dakota Johnson is so good at navigating the heroine’s emotional zigs and zags that you want to buy into the whole cobwebbed premise.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In their last collaboration, "21 Grams," the director Alejandro González Iñárritu and screenwriter Guillermo Arriaga did syntactical acrobatics to disguise what a dreary and exploitive little soap opera they’d made. Their new movie, Babel, is more mysterious and less coherent.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The only moments of conviction come from an Asian-American dominatrix called Pearl (Lucy Liu), who brings far more glee to the task of beating people up than the picture's star or director. If the audience could have half as much fun as Pearl is having, Payback would be a kick.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Johnson rips off a lot of "Batman," especially in the cathedral climax, but that's not so bad: The movie looks best when it looks like other, better movies.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Sporadically funny but uneasily revisionist screwball comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Jenkins is so desperate to give his love story a social and economic context that he stops the movie cold for a bunch of unrelated white people to articulate their grievances over gentrification--it's as if "Annie Hall" had paused for a seminar on agrarian reform.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie coalesces into nothing: It's one of those films that makes you say, "That was powerful. Now what the hell was it about?"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    What's left is a wan and impersonal whodunnit -- a movie that never gets into your blood.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The tall, cool Kidman works hard to impersonate a woman possessed, but she's not the type of actress to fill in a role that hasn't been filled in on paper.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In The Judge, a legal drama that builds to the requisite Hollywood Dark Night of the Soul, Robert Downey Jr. has a role so far inside his comfort zone that the movie has no drive, no urgency.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Cameron has never been known for his dialogue, but Titanic carries some stinkers that wouldn't make the final draft of a "Days of Our Lives" script.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's a great metaphor - but not a great movie. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris direct in a drably naturalistic style, and the script is thin.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Coogan's mopiness is oddly riveting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Neeson's gravity elevates the action, and there's a fine, prickly performance by an actor new to me, Frank Grillo, as the asshole of the group. But The Grey, despite moments of sublimity, is as predictable as a funeral. When Ottway angrily calls out to God, the nonanswer is sadly redundant.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There are no comic highs, as in a Mike Myers parody, but no action highs, either.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It might even have been a landmark film about race relations had its aura of blunt realism not been dispelled by a toxic cloud of dramaturgical pixie dust.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is slick when it needs to be raw, tidy when it needs to sprawl, and amorphous when it needs to focus.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The funniest things in Be Kind Rewind are not the many moments in which Mike and Jerry look like Ed Wood’s worst nightmare, but when the pair finds expedient ways to do for pennies what would take Brett Ratner millions and be less expressive to boot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Larsson is renowned for his attention to marginal details, which gives his prose a rambling, one-thing-after-another pace that many readers find soothing. Onscreen, the lack of acceleration makes for one of those long Scandinavian winter nights.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There are things in San Andreas that no one would have dreamed of seeing 40 years ago, when "Earthquake" (with its tacky, plaster-cracking “Sensurround”) represented the state of the art. But nothing means anything. The spectacle feels less earned than Dwayne Johnson’s biceps, which are ludicrous but not hollow.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The villain comes back more times than Wile E. Coyote. I found it tiresome and witless and numbingly repetitive, but action mavens won't feel cheated.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The gut-whomping, high-concept romantic thriller This Means War is not a distinguished addition to director McG's oeuvre.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A bearable period chick flick with a self-congratulatory “realistic” conceit.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A passably diverting entry in the Tarantino genre of splatter and yuks and soulfully bumbling hit men.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Jackman has musical-theater chops and knows how to sell material this ham-handed; Kidman isn't quite as deft. I've always admired her gumption in working so hard to overcome a certain temperamental tightness--but that tightness has now spread to her skin.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Avenue Montaigne would be difficult to stomach if it weren't so light and uninsistent, and if its actors weren't so charming. I still rolled my eyes--but sometimes I do that when I get a really good croissant.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The drama is so muddled that Shakespeare seems to be getting in the way of Taymor's spectacle, the magic long gone by the time Prospera hurls her staff off into the sea.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Watching The Hunger Games, I was struck both by how slickly Ross hit his marks and how many opportunities he was missing to take the film to the next level - to make it more shocking, lyrical, crazy, daring.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    For all sort of reasons, I was disappointed that there is barely anything of Bruce McGill as the family's hearty swindler. And there is too much of Sarandon, whose big scene--a speech at her late husband's memorial service, complete with jokes and a tap dance--is the movie's most egregious misfire.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is one of Penn's punishing, single-dimension performances, and it seems to be even more whiningly masochistic than what's called for in the script.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Given all its World War II references and parodies, the best audience for Valiant would be addled, octogenarian ex-RAF pilots in the old folks' home.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A second-rate but bearable black comedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The main problem with Lee’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk is superficial, literally. Lee has opted for the rare 120-frames-per-second format, allegedly because he thought it would deepen our connection to the characters. He thought wrong.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Not even the actress' soulfulness can save the generic climax, in which she tussles with the badder bad guy on a collapsing terrace above a crashing surf. As a colleague muttered, "Murder by numbers is right."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Howard might be a major actor. His DJay, though, is a major character in search of a major author.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Slapped with the generic title The Wolverine, the fifth feature-length appearance of Hugh Jackman’s X-Man John Logan is basically "The Bad News Wolverine Goes to Japan" and is not especially world-shaking.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Scene by scene his (David Gordon Green’s) new film, Snow Angels, isn’t terrible. Parts of it are amusing, and there are wintry images that eat into the mind. But it’s one of the most disjunctive things I’ve ever sat through.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is OK for a January horror picture, but given the premise and the cast--it should wring you out emotionally as it's scaring you witless.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Lovelace is a respectable job, but it never goes deep.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A central figure who’s all bad is even more boring than one who’s all good. He has no dramatic stature. He’s a case study. The audience should be paid to listen up.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie’s take at times is fascinating. But it’s basically one long, sick joke played at half speed. It’s a ponderous, sick joke.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Unsatisfying even if, like me, you're a lifelong aficionado of Nixon-bashing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It’s not so much bad as dismayingly bland. It’s WTF for all the wrong reasons.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's a charcoal draft of a movie -- magically allusive on some levels and utterly opaque on others, a strange combination of the overexplicit and the unwritten.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Crowe gets to use his real Aussie voice, which works better with that poker face, and his underplaying at times has a psychotic intensity. But Ryan looks dopey when she's supposed to be stressed-out.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    We’re supposed to take this more seriously because it takes itself more seriously.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At one point, Van Damme delivers a long, tortured soliloquy about his alienating stardom to the camera in a single take. It's the most amazing piece of acting I've ever seen by a martial artist. But the film itself doesn't rise above the level of a good try.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is an ambitious midlife-crisis movie that valiantly weaves together big themes, among them the nagging guilt of the successful, wealthy artist.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Has anyone involved in this disaster ever heard a real story?
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Passable--just.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The sad part is that How Do You Know is nowhere near as dumb as it looks. A couple of comic set pieces are inspired-or would be, if Brooks's timing weren't off.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At least The Green Hornet is likable, and a refreshing change from the heavy, angst-ridden superhero pictures so beloved by obnoxious fanboys.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is another moderately interesting but shallow biopic with an actor going for broke — to win, not to draw.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Marathon of misery.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The preview—if that's truly what it is—has a beginning, a middle, and an end; a host of good lines; and so many goofy surprises that it's hard to believe that there's anything more to see in the picture itself. I mean … they wouldn't show you the entire movie in the coming attraction, would they?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The ending is powerful..., but Shutter Island is a long slog.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's too bad that halfway through, Collateral turns into a series of loud, chaotic, over-the-top action set pieces in which the existentialist Mann proves he's lousy at action.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I hope I'm not raining on Beasts of the Southern Wild's deluge to say it doesn't always live up to its pretensions. There's a lot of unshaped babble and draggy landscape shots, and the music, so lovely in small doses, is numbing when it's ladled over everything.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I'm glad Korine has pulled himself together, but the film is pretty ramshackle, full of obvious group improvisations that fail to spark and an overdose of bathos.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Anger Management is bearable up to its protracted climax, set in Yankee Stadium, which gets my vote for the most excruciating wind-up of any comedy, ever.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Despite glimmers of wit and a hipper-than-thou cast, it's painstakingly smug, and smaller than the sum of its parts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Che
    Che is an impressive physical feat, but especially in the second part, which gives you day after day of rebels being killed and indigenous poor people not joining the good fight, you start to look forward to Che getting riddled by bullets. The whole movie is a forced march.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Forget Alexander: The film is a pedestal to Angelina the great.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There is one nice pop-up scare against a dozen or so false, ineffectual ones - a poor percentage. As the title states, she is a woman and wears black, but she might as well be a hastily decked-out script girl for all her impact.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The chief casualties are the good actors, who are forced to turn themselves into cartoons.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is another of those dead-kid dramas in which the terrible event is handled like a striptease--tantalizing flashes until the climax.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In the all-star movie adaptation of August: Osage County, another play that holds the stage with fang and claw feels less momentous onscreen.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The first half-hour or so of this caper comedy, which is based on an Elmore Leonard crime novel, goes down like a strawberry daiquiri with a little umbrella.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's coarse, primitive, regressive, often very stupid, and sometimes, against all odds, really a hoot.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As an actor, Matt Damon has too much integrity to pretend he can multitask to that advanced degree and still be, you know, a fun person. So he turns his face into a mask of stoicism and gives the dullest performance of his career.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Superficially respectful but ultimately cruel.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    That City by the Sea isn't laughed off the screen is testament to Caton-Jones' attention to actors and to some tightly written scenes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I suppose it's too much to expect Pirandellian stature from the madness of Chuck Barris -- but that's about the only thing that would have made this mixed-up ego trip work.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A few billion 1s and 0s in search of a movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie isn’t dead on arrival, like Snyder’s over-reverent "Watchmen." But it’s pleasure-free.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Turns out to be semi-enjoyable, semi-tacky retelling/updating of the old Elizabeth Bathory legend.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    For In Bruges to click, McDonagh needed either to get more real or more fake.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Too often, it’s the MOVIE that isn’t there. What’s meant to be archetypal comes across as superficial.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A spare, melancholy film that is so far in spirit from its source, Philip Roth's "The Dying Animal."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Few films go as obviously and bewilderingly wrong as Chloe, but for the first hour it’s a potent little melodrama in which the smooth, super-controlled storytelling contains the theme of unruly obsession like a straitjacket.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The story doesn’t feel dramatized. It feels pitched.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Max
    As a ravishingly photographed, high-minded meditation on the potential of art and therapy to exorcise the vilest sort of psychological poison, it is positively riotous -- an Everest of idiocy.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Just don't believe the anti-hype. There are lots of reasons to have a good cry these days -- here's a nice, warm place to get squeezed.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Somewhere in this mess, there might be a very good movie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As a scare picture, Signs is good enough. As a religious parable, it's scarier -- and I don't mean that as a compliment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is a noble enterprise, and Downey is stupendous as usual, but Joe Wright's direction is too slick to elicit much feeling.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's fun to see.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Streep and Jones make themselves small: She's chirpy; he's crusty. Incessant pop standards on the soundtrack supply the emotion the director can't. All that's missing are commercials for estrogen cream and erectile-dysfunction meds.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The last hour is like a night at the comedy club after the headliners have left and the room has the smell of stale beer and flop sweat.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The finished product is in a different league than the whompingly terrible Men in Black II - it hits its marks. But it's not inventive enough to overcome the overarching inertia, the palpable absence of passion.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I laughed -- but mostly to keep from getting depressed about the devolution of mainstream movies.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    People are calling Fifty Shades Darker the worst movie ever made, but it’s really not that terrible. It does, however, misrepresent itself, which is true of most mainstream American films about sex. The movie’s real subject is wealth.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    A perfectly decent second-banana, Rob Schneider, has been over-optimistically elevated to the top of the bunch.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The non-ending turns the whole movie into an elaborate tease, too creepy to dismiss, too shallow to justify its "ambiguities."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The story is hell to follow--the flashbacks aren’t in chronological order--and the nonacting variable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It delighted me; it disgusted me. I celebrate it; I lament it. I'm sure of only one thing: that I don't trust anyone--pro or con--who doesn't feel a twinge of doubt about his or her responses.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Size really is about all that this tedious, underpopulated beanbag of an epic has going for it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The passing of the torch from Raimi to Alvarez is not a momentous occasion. In the end, who really cares? Five years from now, will you want to watch this bloody $14 million extravaganza or Raimi’s shoestring original, which was Amateur Hour elevated to pop art?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Working in a mini-genre whose bones would appear to have been picked clean by the likes of Kevin Williamson and Wes Craven, Glosserman and Stieve find a few pints of fresh blood.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Villeneuve is trying like hell to elevate what turns out to be a dumb genre picture.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    "Three Kings" is fictional, obviously, and Mendes and Broyles were bound by the facts of Swofford's life. But the violence in "Three Kings" was visceral, whereas Jarhead's never penetrates the blood-brain barrier. It's locked away in its narrator's jarhead.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This one is a mess--a misshapen, mawkish tragicomedy bordering on self-parody. Its ambitions deserve respect, though.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie doesn't have any undercurrents, psychological or cinematic. -- The Blessed Mother ends up looking like a drunken housewife.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's the only Almodóvar movie in which feeling, emotional or sexual, doesn't suffuse the imagery and hold the ramshackle melodrama together.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Snow White comedy Mirror, Mirror turns out to be not that terrible - or maybe it's that the terrible first half hour wears you down so much that the rest seems relatively pleasant.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This slender, increasingly monotonous stalker plot feels ludicrously overintellectualized-full of hot air.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The action is bludgeoning. When Max gets pummeled by fists and lethal objects, we get pummeled by light and noise and rock-'em-sock-'em editing. No shrimp, though. As a narrative, "District 9" wasn't particularly original, either — in the end it was a standard conversion melodrama. But everything is better with shrimp.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The whole movie is like an NRA wet dream, with Robert Duvall as a crusty gun-range owner who pitches in to shoot bad guys. Jack Reacher already feels as if it belongs to another era.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is better than you've heard, although that's not saying a lot.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The scale of the enterprise is thrilling; it's too bad the movie is so muddled on so many different levels.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Some of that fun is infectious. For a while. Maybe 45 minutes. But when actors look as if they’re having a better time than you are, the buzz wears off fast. You turn into a wallflower at an especially obnoxious party.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If the staging were as witty as the plotting, Quantum of Solace might have been a corker like "Casino Royale." But when the action starts, art-house-refugee director Marc Forster (Monster’s Ball) mashes together close-ups in the manner of "The Dark Knight," and every big set piece is borderline incoherent.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Gomorrah isn't memorable. The structure feels random, and the characters remain at arm's length. Next to HBO's "The Wire," which depicted an enormous financial ladder and also brought to life the characters on every rung, the movie is small potatoes: excellent journalism, so-so art.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Watching this Pelham--a money job from its conception--you can believe that there's no other motivation on Earth.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As drama, Hilary and Jackie is merely sketchy and superficial. As a portrait of the artist, it's puritanical crap.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Creative Control is the most elegant vision imaginable of a world in the process of losing its moorings.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Although it's shot in lovely, dusty shades of brown with splashes of Coca-Cola red, John Hillcoat's Lawless is dead weight: listlessly classical and then bludgeoning.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie is lighter, more fun, and ultimately more satisfying than its weighty predecessor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The director's beautiful detachment suggests a kind of cowardice.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Travolta keeps you grooving even when the movie's motor runs down--although it has never revved too high to begin with.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    He's (Reeves) not as good as he was playing a menacing Georgia wife-beater in The Gift, but he's an awfully convincing jerk.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    With all the narration and fits of slow motion, the movie seems like the work of a nervous chain-smoker. It lacks concentration--and with it, the potential for rapture.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hopelessly amateurish, the troupe is saved by a remarkably pretty young blonde called Douce with a sweet soprano to match her angel face. The gifted, unknown actress-singer who plays her, Nora Arnezeder, also saves the movie, which would otherwise blur into a mass of droopy, mustached, big-honkered Gallic character actors.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As Brown becomes more flagrantly self-destructive and at the same time more deluded, you realize you're watching "Bad Lieutenant" made by a tediously finger-wagging Jew instead of a tediously desecrating Catholic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The performance is extraordinary, literally: Close resembles no man I've ever seen, or woman either. She's the personification of fear - the fear of being seen through, seen for what she is.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film would be better if it were gentler. It's broadly written and played, the actors too busy telegraphing their characters' emotions to let us contemplate their faces in peace.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The movie substitutes milky, washed-out color and funereal music for insight. The murders are purposely un-fluid: When you see Mohammad or Malvo take a shot, you don’t see the impact of the bullet. When you see the victim struck, you don’t see the shooter.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It will resonate with anyone who has ever buried a loved one and struggled to reconcile the myriad emotions--grief, anger, helplessness. Which is to say, everyone. And yet out of this premise comes glop. Departures needed a little more work in the morgue--like cutting to the bone.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It starts to feel less like a thriller than an actors’ workshop.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It has strong moments and fine, unsentimental performances, but it doesn't jell as a story.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Sour and mostly feeble, with a depressingly curdled worldview. It bears no resemblance to Allen's surreal, open-ended comedies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Johnny Depp makes a valiant stab at the part, but even with his hair thinned and lightened and his face hardened, Depp remains Depp: I never forgot I was watching a big star doing an impersonation. It’s as if the spirit of a psychopath like Bulger resists the camera. Or maybe the movie isn’t imaginative enough to penetrate his shell.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's good enough that you forget how much better Brian De Palma could do it. The rest is a slow road to nowhere, less clunky than "The Interpreter" but bogged down by its own cynicism.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Works only in spurts.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    American Ultra is undemanding late-summer studio fare — ultraforgettable. But I’ll remember the faces of Eisenberg and Stewart, who are easy to ridicule but, whatever the pundits say, very much movie stars.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    What Hooper can’t manage is to put us inside his characters’ heads — where we should be in a story that makes every surface suspect.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hit and miss, but its tone of lyric melancholy is remarkably sustained.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Their amalgamations can be feats of genius, like their stoner-gumshoe farrago "The Big Lebowski." Or they can pretty much lie there, like much of their new, star-packed comedy, Hail, Caesar!, which is nothing but movie fodder.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At its best, 25th Hour is a melancholy tone poem -- But the movie is also muddled by its own ambitions. There is simply no connection between the themes of Benioff's screenplay and 9/11, and every time Lee over-inflates the story, he loses its real pulse.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The final 10 minutes of Win A Date With Tad Hamilton! are likable: one cliché following another, but with charming restraint. Or it might just have been that the movie's simple-mindedness wore me down.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I know I'm going to bring down the room by saying I think it's just okay. Well, Jennifer Hudson is more than okay.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    This is the first big-studio action picture with some of the disgusted, bloody nihilism of the post-Vietnam era.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Without a character, he’s (Pitt) back to that soft, appraising, Robert Redford Jr. stare, his mouth half open as if he’s about to speak but plainly with nothing on his mind apart from, “This is what a movie star looks like without any lines.” The ghouls are having deeper thoughts.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The highest-gloss revenge porn imaginable. It’s hard to believe that so much visual elegance has been brought to bear on material so ugly, and yet the disjunction is intentional, and the film is all of a piece.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    "The Silence of the Lambs," was morbid but also a rich and satisfying serial-killer thriller—a cunning weave of the fairy tale, the forensic, and the fetishistic. Hannibal, on the other hand, is simply a fat slab of sadism.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If you're in the mood for a liberal message movie in which the only surprise is no surprise, American Violet is the ticket.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The picture has some fun slapstick set pieces and an inventively manic turn by Gibson.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The sheer novelty of the enterprise is probably why Once Upon a Time in the Midlands has gotten so many rave reviews when it's actually sort of … middling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The problem is that he — unlike most modern sci-fi directors, who throw so much CGI at you that they make miracles cheap — seems peculiarly stingy when it’s time to deliver.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    More entertaining than it needs to be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The director's knee-jerk anti-capitalism often sticks in my (white, well-fed) craw.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    What's a shock is the crudeness with which Spielberg fills the scenario in -- how he neuters his protagonist and short-circuits the inner workings of his human characters.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Good enough to make you wish it were better.

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