David Edelstein

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For 1,700 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Meru
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede (First Sequence)
Score distribution:
1,700 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    In the end, the point of this ridiculous, arduous, oft-interrupted odyssey turns out to be elusive — and is all the richer for it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It takes about an hour after it's over for the heart to slow, the brain to recalibrate, and the nonsensicalness of the thing to sink in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Loyal assistant, Pepper Potts, isn't much of a part, but Gwyneth Paltrow is a presence. She stands around looking amused and flabbergastingly pretty, slinging wisecracks with serene aplomb.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Soderbergh contrives the perfect voice for Leonard's prose--laid-back and grooving when it needs to be, but also taut, with the eerie foreboding of violence about to erupt.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    One of the most inspired cases of the medium embodying the message ever captured on celluloid.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    As the ghouls evolve toward humanity and the humans toward ghouldom, we can appreciate Romero for using horror to show us How We Live Now, and How We're Living Dead now, too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The elements in A Walk on the Moon, which is directed by the actor Tony Goldwyn (the bad guy in "Ghost") and written by Pamela Gray, feel miraculously right.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Blessed is the go-for-it movie that can make room for dissonances and weirdness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Face/Off is such a blast that at times I forgot I was watching a John Woo movie.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Caine makes Hampton's too-literary narration work by playing it as an inner dialogue: It's the best performance of narration I've ever heard. It makes you want to hear Caine read the whole book--or read anything.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Rich, finely judged, gorgeously acted movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Paranoid Park is a supernaturally perfect fusion of Van Sant’s current conceptual-art-project head-trip aesthetic and Blake Nelson’s finely tuned first-person “young adult” novel.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Shot by shot, scene by scene, it's a fluid and enthralling piece of work. I wasn't bored for a millisecond.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    For all its wizardry, The Incredibles isn't among my favorite animated movies. Weirdly enough, I think of it, instead, as one of my favorite live-action superhero pictures.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    A marvelous feat of re-imagination.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    As a go-for-it music movie, Whiplash is just about peerless. The fear is contagious, but so is the jazz vibe: When Andrew snatches up his sticks and the band launches into a standard—say, Hank Levy’s “Whiplash”—it’s hard not to smile, judder, and sway.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It's a remarkable film--one to gnaw at you and keep you up at night.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Audiard's take is fevered, immediate, and hopeful--a story of a man recovering his soul. The most intense and compelling sections of The Beat are almost word for word from "Fingers" (albeit translated into French), but this beat changes everything.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The world didn't need a remake of The Thomas Crown Affair. We didn't need it, but we got it anyway -- and it's pretty terrific.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    I’ve sat through so many claustrophobic examples of the genre I forgot how exhilarating, how pure a great one could be. Interview is a great one--electric as theater and cinema.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Fiennes and Logan haven't made a definitive Coriolanus, but they've made a sensationally gripping one. They have the pulse of the play, its firm martial beats and its messy political clatter. They tell a damn good story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    An entertaining, emotional, and surprisingly intimate movie--an epic saga of fauns and talking (Cockney) beavers and evil sorceresses and triumphal resurrections and massive, sweeping battles that nonetheless feels … small.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The movie is a triumph of an especially satisfying kind. It arrives at a kind of gnarled grace that’s true to this sorry old man and the family he let down in so many ways.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Joel and Ethan Coen’s Inside Llewyn Davis is an exquisitely crafted tale of woe with heartfelt early-sixties folk music — and an overarching snottiness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Gorgeously silly.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    A big, overlong, and rather unwieldy piece of storytelling, but the story it has to tell is so vital that it cuts through all the dramaturgical muddiness. It's a terrific muckraking melodrama--it will get people fuming.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Mad Max: Fury Road is certainly a blast and a half: You don’t just watch it, you rock out to it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Both a masterpiece and a holy hell: Watching it, you feel you're being punished for a crime you didn't commit. Which puts you, come to think of it, in the same frame of mind as those poor Magdalene girls.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    If I didn't believe that the experience of watching Domestic Violence would change the world for the better, I wouldn't believe in the power of movies. And I wouldn't do what I do.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Mike Myers is like a rich 12-year-old who rents out F.A.O. Schwartz, upends every toy in under two hours, and brings in strippers. He can get away with this privileged romp because he grooves on what he does in a way that none of his contemporaries -- can comprehend.

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