David Edelstein

Select another critic »
For 1,939 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 In the Bedroom
Lowest review score: 0 Funny Games (2008)
Score distribution:
1939 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    As he proves yet again in his thrillingly syncopated heist movie Baby Driver, the 43-year-old U.K.-born Edgar Wright is just about the perfect 21st-century genre director. He has a fanboy’s scintillating palette — flesh-eating zombies, righteous vigilante cops, stoic bank robbers in sunglasses — without a fanboy’s lack of peripheral vision.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Sally Hawkins doesn’t rise above the film’s conception, but she makes it work.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The cast functions brilliantly as individuals and as a unit, each in his or her own world but linked near-telepathically to the movements of the others. Like, come to think of it, a family.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    My Cousin Rachel is a fascinating hybrid. It uses clunky devices out of a 19th-century melodrama, but its subject is modern: mistakes of perception and of metaphor. It’s about the myopia of the male gaze.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 0 David Edelstein
    The Mummy is not your usual lousy movie. It has been made with skill and hits its marks. But those marks are so low and so brazenly mercenary that it doesn’t feel like much of an achievement. It’s not involving.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The superb English stage director David Leveaux keeps the pacing taut while creating space for his actors to work their magic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The only grace note in the generally clunky Wonder Woman is its star, the five-foot-ten-inch Israeli actress and model Gal Gadot, who is somehow the perfect blend of superbabe-in-the-woods innocence and mouthiness.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s the smart-ass nerd’s Baywatch. The movie is okay, though, if you don’t mind manic pacing and icky dick jokes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    It’s stuffed to the gills with effects executed by the highest-paid artists and technicians in the business. But it’s still a sorry spectacle.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Coppola’s The Beguiled doesn’t have the southern-gothic kick of its predecessor. It’s not a horror movie. Its power is in its undercurrents, in the sense that what we’re seeing isn’t inevitable but a sort of worst-case scenario of genders in opposition. No one is wholly good or bad. Both sides are beguiled.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The dialogue of Alien: Covenant is often clunky and its plot repetitious. (As usual these days, there are too many climaxes.) But it’s scary and splatterful, which is all it really needs to be. It holds you.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s a closed, depressing vision, elevated by compassion and superbly evocative filmmaking.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    I’m not sure about Hawn. A youthful twitterer, she has developed an expressively croaky voice, but nothing about her reads “nervous, agoraphobic cat lady.” She’s no longer a jumpy clown — she doesn’t need the humiliation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    You should — you must — see Last Men in Aleppo to witness an ongoing tragedy. But you should also see it to learn humility. We — meaning Americans — ain’t seen nothin’. Yet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Writer-director Azazel Jacobs has made a very smart movie about a very dumb idea.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The Circle is a tonal mess: part satire, part moralistic melodrama. Some of it is broadly acted, some of it subtle, much of it overheated. It has great moments, though.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The comedy in One Week and a Day comes from confusion, ineptitude, and alienation. It comes from people’s defenses being way, way down. It doesn’t cheapen the tragedy. It grounds it, sometimes in the mud.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It’s not the weighty emotions that drag Vol. 2 down. It’s the plot that chases its own tail and the cluttered visual palette.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The film is no masterpiece — again, George can’t illuminate why a million people were murdered by their own countrymen. But as we focus on Rusesabagina’s almost farcically desperate attempts to forestall tragedy, we have a vision of genocide as a virus with its own terrible momentum.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The result is reasonably entertaining and totally disposable. Which it shouldn’t be, given that its focus is on guns and the way that they facilitate mayhem. Gory farce can be bracing. It’s the glibness that’s unconscionable.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The final scenes are potent enough to save the movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The Lost City of Z(ed) isn’t as expansive as you might initially wish but still pulls you in and along.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Vigalondo demonstrates that even the dumbest genres can be used to profound ends — not cheapening serious things but kicking them to the next metaphoric level. A woman finding her inner strength is inspiring. But a woman finding her inner giant monster who kicks butt — that’s just so cool.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I wish the movie had more of a tragic undercurrent — the tone is wobbly.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It doesn’t have the youthful kick of its predecessor, but given the pervasiveness of addiction and suicidal ideation and despair it’s amazingly buoyant.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    It’s mesmerizing, too vivid to be evanescent, too precious to hold.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    If you have a penchant for mood pieces that flirt with genre but are too pretentious to deliver the full climactic payload, Personal Shopper is for you. I loved nearly all of it, disposed to forgive Assayas his arty withholding for the pleasure of watching Stewart through his eyes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s world away from the mystery and irrevocable tragedy that Barnes evokes in his slim novel. The climactic revelation is very sad, but it doesn’t wound you.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Its combination of lavishness and lack of imagination is the only thing memorable about it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Tukel takes a big risk in Catfight: using farcical means to weave together personal and political tragedies, so that each dimension feeds the other. The rough edges and occasional clunks are a small price to pay.

Top Trailers