David Edelstein
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For 1,627 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Waltz with Bashir
Lowest review score: 0 Life Is Beautiful
Score distribution:
1,627 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Excitingly convoluted.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Rivette has aged into one of cinema’s most ingenious minimalists. In The Duchess of Langeais he uses intertitles--bits of literary exposition--with cheeky understatement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Compared with other first-person motion-sickness horror pictures like "The Blair Witch Project" and "Cloverfield," George A. Romero’s Diary of the Dead is weak tea, yet there’s enough social commentary (and innovative splatter) to acidulate the brew--to remind you that Romero, even behind the curve, makes other genre filmmakers look like fraidy-cats.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Hideously depressing but also enraging documentary.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The Grand is a seesaw, but the setting--the high-stakes poker subculture--is remarkably fertile and the actors are a treat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Honoré has proven you can make a movie musical in which style doesn’t upstage content--a movie musical that blossoms from the inside out.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie makes you empathize with the rage that drives these young men to violence--but it also makes you see how manly action wipes out their individuality, their uniqueness, and turns them into archetypal meatheads.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What makes My Brother Is an Only Child so alive and entertaining is how it dramatizes the endless tug-of-war between political conviction and personal experience--the way the lines twist and blur and finally implode.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s ironic that Stop-Loss loses its momentum when the characters go on the road. Yet Rasuk--the star of "Raising Victor Vargas"--gives a stunning performance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    My favorite rock-concert movies, Jonathan Demme’s "Stop Making Sense" and "Neil Young: Heart of Gold," are organic: They chart a miraculous path from sound to soul. Scorsese stays on the outside, as befits his temperament and his subject. Yet there is, amid the whirligig spectacle, a spark of connection.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Once past the clunky prologue, the film is great fun, with a good balance between computer effects and athleticism.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    So how's the Mamet "Rocky"? Fast. Lively. In your face. Very watchable. And, like its predecessors, so bizarrely convoluted it barely holds together on a narrative level. But the underpinnings are consistent.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Has a mixture of edginess and melancholy that's beautifully sustained until the climax, when the tang of realism becomes the cudgel of melodrama.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Broadly, this is a coming-of-age movie in the "Diner" mold: Trier tracks Phillip and Erik and a few of their pals as they stagger into a world that can't be attuned to their (male adolescent) expectations--especially in regard to women.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Howard A. Rodman's script has a lot of juice, and the rhythms are so pregnant that the air vibrates with something, even if you're not sure what.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Sex and the City: The Motion Picture is a joyful wallow. And it's more: In this summer of do-overs (The Incredible Hulk, a new Batman versus a new Joker), it's what the series finale should have been.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The Incredible Hulk is weightless--as disposable as an Xbox game. It's also fairly entertaining: swift, playful without pitching into camp, and acted with high spirits.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Get Smart the sitcom was a one-joke affair and got tedious fast, whereas Carell’s starry-eyed dweeb has room for nuance, for growth, for inspiration.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Operation Filmmaker doesn't quite shake out as a microcosm of the American-Iraq relationship, although Davenport cheekily toys with the conceit. But the movie is endlessly resonant.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Midway through, an eerier theme creeps in, all the more powerful for Herzog's lack of insistence. By the "end of the world" he means the end of the world.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The first half of Quid Pro Quo is among the most jaw-dropping things I"ve ever seen: Who knew there was a closeted subculture of people pretending to be paraplegics?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film is freaky, amusing, and sickening in equal measures—part fly-on-the-wall vérité, part multiple-perspective Altmanesque tragicomedy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    All over the map, but it's worth enduring the botched gags, formula plotting, and even the racism to marvel at the genius of Robert Downey Jr.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    All in all, Frozen River is gripping stuff. Except it's also rigged and cheaply manipulative.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    As he delivered his climactic sermon in the Israeli desert, I murmured, "Amen, brother." Religulous is a religious experience.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Menzel’s touch is sprightly, lyrical, mischievously understated.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Fanning is a child actor with a grown-up soul, and every move, every breath, seems mysteriously right.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The best thing in the movie is Stewart. She was the leggy hobo-camp teen in love with Emile Hirsch in "Into the Wild," and she's better at conveying physical longing than any of the actors playing vampires.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Milk is one of the most heartfelt portraits of a politician ever made--the man himself remains just out of reach.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is ludicrous, but Eastwood’s consistency is poignant. He has an agenda and sticks to it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The acting, the on-the-fly atmosphere (the film was shot quickly), and Leguizamo's increasingly urgent hustle are deeply evocative, but parts of the movie are almost too painful to endure.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    As a onetime dramaturg and Brechtian, I enjoyed the chin-wags and the glimpses of Streep in rehearsal--especially her quivering admission that she can't bear the thought of anyone seeing her process.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Taken--in the hands of director Pierre Morel (District B13), with Neeson in nearly every shot--works like gangbusters. The Frenchies have made the filet mignon of meathead vigilante movies.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There's a huge change that turns the nihilistic carnage of Craven's original into something suffused with old-fashioned family values, so that we can relax and enjoy watching the bad guys get beaten, skewered, dismembered by garbage disposals, and tortured with microwave ovens.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The reason to see An American Affair is Gretchen Mol. She has a mild, natural way of holding herself that's likably unactressy--in every film, she seems both smart and grounded.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The documentary is solid as … as … an anvil. And if you can forget Spinal Tap (hard), it's also rather touching the way these 50-year-olds still have the forged-in-fire fortitude.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Delicate, wrenching, occasionally vexing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Julie & Julia is full of holes, but you don't even care when Streep is onscreen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Public Enemies has incidental pleasures (its hi-def video palette is fascinatingly weird), but it’s only Depp’s sense of fun that keeps it from being a period gangster museum piece.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The sheer scale of the movie is mind-blowing--it touches on every aspect of modern life. It's the documentary equivalent of "The Matrix": It shows us how we're living in a simulacrum, fed by machines run by larger machines with names like Monsanto, Perdue, Tyson, and the handful of other corporations that make everything.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Is Brüno riotous? Yes, more so than "Borat," in which Baron Cohen's targets were ducks in a barrel and largely undeserving of ridicule. He doesn't aim much higher here, but his tricks are more inventive.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A pretentious and stilted but weirdly compelling blend of sins-of-the-parent saga and horror movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie's evolution from somber spiritual torment to icky body horror to fetishistic sex to wild lyricism (vampires pogoing off buildings) to Grand Guignol splatter is exhilarating.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    On one level: groan. On another: No one else seems about to make those arrests. The only thing that would scare Wall Street straight is the image of Michael Moore as the new sheriff in town.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Surprisingly intimate and nuanced.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Page is softer than in "Hard Candy" and "Juno." Without Diablo Cody comebacks, she’s even more marvelous.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie gives off a stranger vibe. Beavan is both a hero and a figure of fun, a man whose ideals are in constant collision with the habits of modern life.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    For all its original touches, though, An Education follows a conventional trajectory.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I’ve never seen a movie that so cunningly exploits our anticipation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    More Eurocentric but quite enjoyable, even for those of us who don’t follow British “football.”
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A meathead revenge picture, but it’s very satisfying. Director Martin Campbell, coming off "Casino Royale," has a style that’s blunt and bruising.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Any war picture in which the heroine stalls the villain with a quiet, painstaking tea ceremony until the wind shifts direction and the good guys can firebomb the bad guys into oblivion is too ineffably Zen not to love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The tony cast emotes like mad, but polished Brits are so temperamentally unlike Russians that every four-syllable patronymic sounds like iambic pentameter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Miguel Arteta’s rollicking Youth in Revolt is one of several recent movies to elevate the generic coming-of-age teen sex comedy to a plane of surrealism.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is unfailingly likable and finally impressive. Goldin doesn’t settle for easy answers, and he makes you think that no one should.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Morel will inevitably be compared to John Woo, whom he trounces. He has fewer mannerisms (no damn doves) and a keener eye; his fastest, most kinetic shots flow together like frames in a flipbook.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Rahim is an exciting, unpredictable presence, and Arestrup’s César has a stature that’s nearly Shakespearean.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Greenberg would be a heckuva movie if we could just get Greenberg out of there.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Part goofy drug comedy, part shocking bloodbath. It’s a riot of tones and genres, but unlike that other recent hybrid, "Pineapple Express," the parts add up to something larger.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Kick-Ass is a compendium of all sleazy things, and it sings like a siren to our inner Tarantinos.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Caine makes a grave, soulful vigilante avenger, and first-time director Daniel Barber gives the film a dank, streaky, genuinely unnerving palette.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Holofcener’s plotting can seem casual (many characters, no speeches pointing up the themes, no conventional climaxes), but her dialogue is smart, an oscillating mixture of abrasiveness and balm, of harsh satire and compassionate pullback.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It doesn’t come close to the emotional heft of those two rare 2s that outclassed their ones: Superman 2 and Spider-Man 2. But Iron Man 2 hums along quite nicely.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Gibney does finally kick the focus off Abramoff to bemoan the legalized-bribery system that’s the rule, not the exception.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Mother and Child is suffused with grief and loss. It’s also suffused with compassion and insight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I’m not wholly clear on the link between a jellied green thing wriggling along a tree branch and the oneness of life, but Shinto Buddhist ruminations sound good in almost any context, and the film is entrancing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Weisz is an excellent Hypatia. For all her intelligence, there's something childish, off-kilter, vaguely otherworldly in her aura. She's just the type to be gazing into the heavens while around her all hell breaks loose.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    By turns desperately funny and unfunnily desperate?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This wistful little film is at just the right temperature.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Solondz conjures a world that's rotting away from the inside, in which only the children--freckle-faced Dylan Riley Snyder and Emma Hinz--weep over the loss of moral authority. This might be some kind of goddamned masterpiece, but I'm not sure I want to watch it again to say for sure.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Early on, writer-director David Michôd serves up "Trainspotting"-like tricks and narration that is beguiling, if rarely apropos. But the actors are something.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A haunting duet for two great actors who haven't lost a step and have gained the most exquisite lyricism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Although Catfish is opportunistic, even borderline exploitive, it gets at-by indirection, through the back door-the magic-carpet aspect of this scary new medium. Real people are so complicated and irreducible, you know?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Lisa Kudrow does a dazzling turn as a guidance counselor who's a flickering mixture of sympathy and narcissism. But the movie belongs to Stone, that gorgeous, husky-voiced redhead.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This is a mood piece, shapeless but often lyric.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    As much of her (Steen) as there is, you'll want more.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It helps that Reilly is the opposite of a slob-comic. With his hangdog melancholy, he makes even the nonstop cunnilingus allusions poignant-the product of emotional longing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It comes together neatly, perhaps too neatly to be … poetry. But it's not prosaic, either. It has a lucid grace.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The Eagle is furiously unsettled-thematically, temporally, meteorologically. Wild-eyed, long-haired Brits leap atop the Romans' shields as the soldiers blindly hack away, the bodies so close that you can barely tell the victor from the vanquished. The battles in the fog and rain have a hallucinatory power.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's a terrific performance-and terrifying. Owen Wilson is aging: Where goeth my own youth?
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Uncle Boonmee is entrancing-and also, if you're not sufficiently steeped in its rhythms, narcotizing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Wasikowska's Jane is as watchful as only a damaged soul can be, and, when challenged, frighteningly fast.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The third and least original of the Pegg-Frost features, but it's still a lot funnier than most films of its ilk.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Yes, this farrago of fairy tale and sci-fi conspiracy flick is, on one level, howlingly obvious. But there are howls of derision and howls of amazement, and mine were of the latter kind, mostly.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's surprising that The Greatest Movie Ever Sold plays so entertainingly, given that Spurlock's quest is essentially beside the point.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There's something appealing about the movie's unpretentious carnival of carnage, although I could have done without the flamethrower assault on a school bus to raise the stakes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Equal parts trippy, tacky, and monumental, the blend surprisingly agreeable, a happy change from all those aggressively down-to-earth superhero flicks like "Iron Man."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Tabloid is candy for voyeurs. We laugh like mad at a nut whose only mistake was being born in the last century, too early to have made real money.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The script, by Dan Fogelman, is unusually and gratifyingly bisexual - i.e., it boasts scenes from both the male and female points of view!
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Like much of Soderbergh's recent work, Contagion feels a little sterile, more like a cinematic exercise than something with blood pumping through it. It's certainly high-minded - it might be the most high-minded disaster movie ever made.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie doesn't quite come together, but it's full of smart, cynical talk, and it's very entertaining.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie belongs to Gordon-­Levitt and Anna Kendrick as his painfully green therapist.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Like Crazy has a lively syntax and could, in an ungrateful mood, be tagged as slick. But Doremus gets the tempos right.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A shameless but exuberantly well-done caper comedy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    For all the wizardry on display, Hugo often feels like a film about magic instead of a magical film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    David Fincher's American remake of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo adds nothing to the previous adaptation, but it's certainly the more evocative piece of filmmaking.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    But the question hangs: Does this artificial, three-hankie scenario justify its 9/11 appropriations? Dry your eyes and decide for yourself.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Cameron Crowe is a romantic bordering on utopian, and his authentic family values - biological and surrogate - shine through in his enchanting We Bought a Zoo.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A scabrous, amusing, and thoroughly predictable exercise in exposing the animalistic underbellies of grown-ups pretending to be civilized liberals.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is wonderful, nonsensical fun.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    McQueen films his characters like specimens in a jar, but the stakes are so high that the actors deliver.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    That wordiness coupled with Cronenberg's classical restraint is part of the splendid Freudian joke at the movie's center.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Shallow but satisfying, largely because of Meryl Streep and her big fake English teeth and gift for using mimicry as a means of achieving empathy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Soderbergh tends to get one big idea - a thesis idea - per film and stick with it even when a touch more flexibility would help. Here it's that non-kinetic camera, which he's so wedded to that parts of the film seem underenergized, like a cheap seventies or early eighties picture you'd catch at two in the morning on Cinemax's tenth most popular channel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A poky but blood-freezing throwback to the gothic horror films of the seventies, when ingénues moved tremulously down dark corridors without holding digital video cameras.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    You've got to make room in your heart for a film in which the world ends with neither a bang nor a whimper but a cuddle.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There are a couple of hundred instances in which Johnson or her actors could take condescending short cuts and slip into white-trash stereotypes, but I didn't see any - only gifted performers vanishing into their characters, refusing to pass judgment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    [A] compelling film touching on the perils of being young - that's it, merely young - in a culture without justice.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's not fresh terrain for satire, yet most of the jokes play riotously well.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It has a bad, slapstick first act but by midpoint becomes strangely compelling, tapping into the fantasy of reliving one's high-school years (which did a number on us all) and getting it right.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Despite the simplicity of the brothers' technique, The Kid With a Bike has deep religious underpinnings, a relentless drive toward the mythos of death and resurrection. The film is not just in the tradition of Pinocchio and A.I.: It is a worthy successor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Bully is repetitive and not especially artful, but children who allow themselves to see the world through the eyes of the film's victims will never be the same.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Stillman's comeback comedy Damsels in Distress is wobbly and borderline twee, but it deepens as it goes along and becomes rich.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Is it scary? Not especially. But there are enough gory surprises around every bend to keep you laughing/screaming/cringing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Ineffably sad - yet there's almost no loitering. The film is crisp, evenly paced, its colors bright, as sharp as the winter cold.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Batmanglij keeps the movie even-keeled, full of medium close-ups, underscored by ambient plinks and shimmers, with nothing to break the trance until a last scene that upends everything we thought we knew.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A charming, funny, reactionary mating comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Kargman is light on her feet, and she has chosen to follow a fascinating group of kids preparing for the 2010 Youth America Grand Prix.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Koreeda's compositions have a sympathetic detachment that Americans rarely value but is, for many Japanese, the whole point of art. That means you can contemplate the wonder in these glowing young faces without feeling as if you're on an intravenous drip of corn syrup.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    On its own terms, Bernie is smoothly made and reasonably entertaining, Linklater doing his Austin-based best not to condescend to the locals - at least the East Carthage locals.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The good news is that The Dictator is a loose and silly and occasionally exhilarating political farce in the tradition of Chaplin's The Great Dictator (obviously) and the Marx Brothers' antiwar masterpiece "Duck Soup." And it comes in at a fleet 83 minutes - just right.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It left me bemused instead of moved, but true Andersonites will likely float away in a state of nirvana.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie's revisionist tone is startlingly enough to carry you along.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's a different sort of experience: a stately, somewhat plodding but endurable science-fiction saga.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I was blissed out during much of To Rome With Love, but I have to acknowledge its creepy side.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I've saved the best for last: The love interest played by that throaty redheaded (here blonde) darling Emma Stone, whose blue eyes radiate so much intelligence that any actor on whom she trains them in adoration becomes an instant movie star.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film is impressive. It has a bit of the cinematic whoop-de-doo of his noxious "Natural Born Killers," in which serial killers became existential heroes, celebrated for attaining absolute freedom.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The best thing in Gilroy's "Michael Clayton" was the final scene between George Clooney and Tilda Swinton, the one in which the vise tightened click by click on Tilda. This is another vice-tightening sequence, but scary instead of triumphant, and with a long and explosive punch line. Finally, a sequence we can follow! After this, Gilroy owns us.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Robot & Frank, like its protagonist, is charming enough to get by with the sleight-of-hand. Its irresponsibility redeems it - it's a raspberry blown against the dying of the light.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Moment to moment, Sleepwalk With Me is smooth and very entertaining, but it's arrested somewhere between fiction and autobiography.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The confusion in For a Good Time, Call… is delightful, the phone-sex talk sweetening the vibe. Justin Long is peerlessly funny as the girls' gay pal, but the movie belongs to Graynor, who's like Sandra Bullock with a touch of Ginger Rogers–y brass.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    She has the perfect nervy, nerdy, needy alter ego in Anna Kendrick.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Sam Rockwell kills as the hero's loony tunes best friend, deliciously abetted by Christopher Walken as an aging, sad-sack dognapper.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The briskness of The Sessions works against it: It lacks the fullness of the best films of its ilk, chief among them Jim Sheridan's "My Left Foot." But Lewin lets his eye wander pleasingly.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I was happy watching these actors, happy going behind the scenes of a sober classical music ensemble instead of another druggy rock group, happy hearing Beethoven for a couple of hours. The movie is haut-bourgeois to the bone, but so am I: Let's hear some chamber music and have a little laugh and a cry!
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Beyond the Mafia-like code of silence, it comes down to this: The guys at the top reserved their compassion for priests like Father Murphy in the belief that the boys were young and would get over it. No one of true faith will get over Maxima Mea Culpa.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Rust and Bone doesn't come together, but it's a triumph of non-actorish acting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    He's [Pitt] not particularly inventive - with his appraising eyes and a toothpick in his mouth, he's like Redford without the edge - but he uses his stardom cannily, to kill with softness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A glancing, disjointed little movie that captures as well as any film I've seen the mind-expanding mojo of rock and roll at the dawn of the counterculture - particularly rhythm-and-blues-oriented rock, particularly the Rolling Stones, the group that synthesized R&B and made it commercial.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The plotting isn't fresh, and the politics are a tad reactionary, but the movie is also shapely, rounded, satisfying - a classical ghost story.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film is a canny balancing act, making Koch's arrogance so plain that you quickly move past it and concede that he accomplished remarkable things for a city that was broke and in chaos and with much of its housing stock in ruins.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The upshot is a shoot-‘em-up with a lean palette and relatively streamlined carnage, wet but not sloppy. It can almost pass for “classical.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    To like Trance as much as I did, you have to revel in the senseless showmanship — in watching Boyle indulge his taste for cinematic flight, in this case teasing you with the old “Is this real or a dream?” number so artfully that you don’t care that much about the answer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Mud
    It’s hard to believe Nichols thinks he can get away with all this and harder still to believe he does. It’s the quality of the attention that he brings — his focus — that makes his work so engrossing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Pain & Gain gives you a rush while at the same time making you queasy about how you’re getting off.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    At least this time "Goopy" Paltrow gets to perform a few superheroics herself, along with enduring some heavy-duty torture that’s bound to please her haters — for whom the sight of the top of her face being peeled off in "Contagion" was like Christmas in July.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film is wrenching all the same, and subtle enough in its portrait of the four major grown-up characters to qualify as Jamesian.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    You can find fault with virtually every scene in Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby — and yet in spite of all the wrong notes, Fitzgerald (and the excess he was writing about and living) comes through. The Deco extravagance of the big party scenes is enthralling. Luhrmann throws money at the screen in a way that is positively Gatsby-like, walloping you intentionally and un- with the theme of prodigal waste.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Is the movie good? It’s hard to be objective. The plotting is clunky and nonsensical, but Abrams and crew bombarded me into happiness. More than that, they made me feel so special for getting the in-jokes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The driving in the film is a thing of beauty.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    You gasp at the ecstatic convergence of lung power and spirit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Apart from scenes with Leslie Mann as a mother who propagates the wisdom of The Secret (she’d be too heavy-handed for a Disney Channel sitcom), The Bling Ring is enjoyable. And it’s always easy on the eyes.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Of all the dumb megabudget "Die Hard"–like action pictures of the last few years (including that other White House Goes Boom movie, "Olympus Has Fallen"), this is both the most entertaining and the most inviting of viewers' input.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Rufus Norris’s debut film, Broken, is a fractured, tonally scrambled British coming-of-age movie with flashes of greatness and an intensely felt performance by a young actress named Eloise Laurence.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s amazing how skilled he (Allen) is in making his old ideas seem fresh, lively, even urgent. His new drama Blue ­Jasmine comes this close to being a wheeze. But he sells it beautifully.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Crudely ­powerful. You can object to the thuggish direction and the script that’s a series of signposts, but not the central idea, which is genuinely illuminating.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Thanks for Sharing is never quite crazy or funny enough to transcend its “disease-of-month” template. The title turns out to not be ironic — a mixed blessing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is a broad ethnic comedy, but there’s nothing broad about the wicked-smart way it’s executed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s when the Somalis spirit Phillips away in a closed lifeboat that Captain Phillips becomes a great thriller, in part because Barry Ackroyd’s camera is stuck inside with the characters and its jitters finally seem earned.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie nails all this, and it’s smashingly effective as melodrama. But McQueen’s directorial voice — cold, stark, deterministic — keeps it from attaining the kind of grace that marks the voice of a true film artist.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Thor: The Dark World gets a lot more entertaining in the second hour, when the shape-shifting Loki is sprung from his cell (for complicated reasons) and immediately begins trading bitchy insults with his forthright, manly brother.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The chronology is confusing at times, but the film is never not fascinating.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Cold Turkey is a simmering piece of holiday dystopia with a good, scorching boil-over.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Scene after scene rockets past dumb, past camp, past Kabuki, and into the Milky Way of Silly where laws can be made up and discarded as long as what happens gets laughs.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s a graceful, engaging film — I enjoyed it. But it could have been called "The Tasteful Dozen."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The Murmelstein interview didn’t make it into Shoah, and Lanzmann sat on it, saying in a written prologue that he finally decided he had “no right to keep it to himself.” I wish he’d brought it out in Murmelstein’s lifetime. (The rabbi died in 1989.) He deserved the chance to be heard by the people who hated him most — who probably still would hate him but come away with ­respect.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s a rare “reboot” that transcends its studio’s money-grubbing. It has some Big Ideas.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I’d liked him to have asked the judge specifically about the MySpace girl, whose case led to his comeuppance. But it’s a huge story, and Kids for Cash provides a measure of justice.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me is one of those showbiz docs that’s not exactly pleasurable but offers a penetrating glimpse — sometimes too penetrating — into what it means to eat, drink, and be contrary in the public sphere.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s both dumber and more entertaining than anyone had a right to expect.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Beneath the expensive, computer-generated busyness of this second Captain America installment is a bracing, old-style conspiracy thriller made extra-scary by new technology and the increasingly ugly trade-offs of a post-9/11 world.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    At times the film is right on the border between mesmerizing and narcotizing, but it casts an otherworldly spell.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Joe
    You can be of two minds about the movie’s climax without shame. It’s galvanizing and, after all the accumulated tension, longed-for. And it’s too easy. And it’s rousingly well done. And it’s cheap. And that’s what makes the vigilante myth so vexing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What hallucinogen was Turturro on when he came up with this plot? It’s so crazy that it’s … fun.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I doubt many things — almost everything, to be frank — but I have no doubt that my Heaven Is for Real audience slept better that night. Whatever works.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The most powerful aspect of this strange little movie is the sense that in an instant things could go very, very bad — even if they don’t. Palo Alto puts you on edge because it’s all dangerous corners.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Not a lot happens, and yet, as in the best so-called “slice of life” stories, you feel one way of life ending and another struggling to be born. The little that happens is enough.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    He’s (Singer) reborn — deft, elegant, spring-heeled — in X-Men: Days of Future Past. The special effects don’t bog him down: They lift the movie to a surreal and more emotional dimension.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is a cunning piece of storytelling, but it’s thin.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film does, however, have the best weapon in the world against the perception of slickness: an actress without a smidgen of actressiness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s probably no great loss, but here and elsewhere the seams show. And in this sort of movie it’s often more fun before we get our bearings and have time to say, “This makes no sense.”
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The beauty of Obvious Child is that there’s nothing obvious about it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s overbaked art-pulp. You’re always thinking, What fresh horror is around the next bend?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Begin Again is very funny, mostly because Ruffalo makes such an adorably rumpled drunken a--hole.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    At heart, it’s about as naughty as an old Disney movie with Dean Jones, Suzanne Pleshette, and an unruly Great Dane. I liked its gung-ho slapstick spirit, though. No one’s slacking off.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What’s on display here is a great actor at his absolute peak — damn it all.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    An outlandishly entertaining mixture of high silliness and high style.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    James Franco’s adaptation of the sick little Cormac McCarthy period novel Child of God is surprisingly pretty good.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    As befits its settings, The Trip to Italy aims higher than its predecessor — maybe too high — and isn’t as fresh. I enjoyed it, though.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s funny, clunky, earnest, and barely credible, but it’s all of a piece.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Women deserve their own gross-out movies, and, in Wetlands, the punk force is strong. If your taste runs thataway, you should see it in a theater with one eye on the audience — and hope that a few people will think they’re going to see a documentary about threatened ecosystems. Talk about all wet!
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The talented writer-director Scott Frank comes awfully close in his adaptation of one of Block’s better novels, A Walk Among the Tombstones. I’d be way more enthusiastic if Frank hadn’t swapped out the book’s horrific, unforgettable ending for something so conventional, I can barely remember it a few days later.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Like Pynchon’s novel, it’s a little insular, too cool for school. It’s drugged camp. Some of the plot points get lost in that ether — it’s actually less coherent than Pynchon, no small feat. It’s not shallow, though.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Michael Cuesta’s Kill the Messenger made me so angry over the apparent injustice done to its journalist hero, Gary Webb (Jeremy Renner), that I found it hard to remain in my seat.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    In his florid sci-fi opera Interstellar, Christopher Nolan aims for the stars, and the upshot is an infinite hoot — its dumbness o’erleaps dimensional space. It’s hugely entertaining, though.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I’m only half-kidding when I suggest that you see the movie but leave (especially if you have kids) at what’s obviously the end of the first act. You’ll still get the dissonances, ambiguities, and portents of doom, along with much that is pure enchantment. And you won’t leave thinking the movie had been made by the Big Bad Wolf.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Because I'm a sucker--I was entertained...The script is good at making you think that it has better cards than it really does. And the actors constitute a royal flush--OK, OK, enough with the poker metaphors.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Its structure is repetitive, but each scene begins with a joyous blast of comic energy...A hoot.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Once the premise had been established and the leads began to interact, I stopped totting up the inanities and had a good time.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Fitfully haunting and impressive: a little less loitery and opaque and it might have been a classic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's square, stiff, and in places cheesy; it's also authentically harrowing -- and blood-showered, blood-drowned.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    At his best (Woo)'s too promiscuous with the slow motion; and once those doves start fluttering in he enters a new dimension in self-parody.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Groove offers the most wholesome vision of orgiastic oneness imaginable -- it's a raver's version of "The Love Boat."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Quite likable -- even sometimes, with the squeezable Zellweger its principal object, lovable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's only fitting that we emerge from Series 7 feeling both entertained and implicated.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Faithless is almost entirely insight-free. Bergman gives no indication that he understands the link between his alter ego's "retroactive jealousy" and compulsive womanizing.
    • Slate
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I fear that the cozy domestic ending will leave audiences disappointed, convinced that they've seen something smaller and less momentous than they have.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Gleefully pushes everyone's buttons...and that manages to exploit our own racial discomfort and envy in ways that leave us hungry for more.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A religious conspiracy disguised as a romance.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A lot more fun than "Blair Witch," and it's more relaxed and goofy than its two predecessors -- a farcical bloodbath.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Most haunting of all is Caan, who has never given a performance this layered.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Nunez's movies go places, but with no acceleration.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Quite pleasant.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Duchovny is rather endearing and Driver's absolutely enchanting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The laughs are fuller when they're rooted in authentic desperation, and the premise is yeasty enough to keep the film from sinking into facile hopelessness.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film, smoothly directed by David Dobkin, has a neat farcical structure but is too in love with its overly tight-lipped protagonist and deadpan pacing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    That's what these sequences feel like -- a sensual uproar. They almost make this small, unresolved little movie feel mythic.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Armageddon is awesome, dude, but it's, like, short on awe.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie, without seeming to realize it, turns into a romantic parable about the joys of being absorbed by a conglomerate.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is very beautiful, with a shambling pace and slow fade-ins and fade-outs; and when it works there's a tension between its characters' scuffling small-talk and its majestically ruined rural setting.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Doesn’t have the warmth of the Toy Story pictures, but it still boasts a very entertaining slapstick-farce structure and some neat hairy, oozy, tendrilly creatures.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It demands to be seen, for Drew Barrymore, who is at once the dizziest and most magically poised comedienne in movies today.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Thirteen has a way of smashing through your defenses. Hardwicke has goosed up the old melodramatic formula with a neorealist syntax and up-to-the-minute cultural nuances and violence.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Squirmily funny documentary.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A glorious, visceral mess -- The film is, by most criteria, an ungainly piece of storytelling. Yet it sweeps you up and hurtles you along like water from an exploded dike.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    In some strange way, I admire the enterprise. Like his Gerrys, Van Sant doesn't seem to know where he's going to wind up when he embarks on these journeys. The ether that seeps into his head might be the price we have to pay for his keeping his mind so open.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A fun ride. It's loud and obvious, but it's also the first high-tech, sci-fi thriller to think through some of the implications of cloning and capitalism.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    There's a great, Hitchcockian suspense sequence in a bathtub.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Nearly perfect for what it is.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Better than anyone dared hope: bigger, more inventive, and more frolicsome than its predecessor, with a grab bag of scatological gags that are almost as riotous when you think back on them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    If you want rich folk-art colors, brainy spectacle, and breezy soap opera, then Frida is the biopic for you.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's so exciting to have a perfectly sung and acted Tosca (Avatar) on film that I'm prepared to forgive the new movie, directed by Benoit Jacquot, almost everything. But I sure wish Jacquot hadn't bungled the look and feel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's on the verge of being really good...his narrative peters out without a decent payoff. It's a testament to the rage and anxieties that he has brilliantly tapped into that he can't get away with a subdued conflagration and a lame twist at the end.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    He thrilled me, then betrayed me in the end.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    You have to give credit to Frailty for jiggering up the formula a bit, so that what starts as an ominously low-key study of a boy coming of age with a mad father escalates into a combination of "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and "Breaking the Waves" -- Grand Guignol religiosity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is mechanical, but machines can be elegant, even inspired.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is a passable entertainment -- call it The Half Monty.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    That neither tale is especially interesting doesn't matter -- the contrast alone is enough to make Sliding Doors an irresistible romantic fantasy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's a testament to Norton's utter immersion in the role that he can even halfway connect the dots between this fundamentally sweet, brainy kid and the magnetic, white trash monster who'll haunt our minds long after the movie's liberal pieties fade into static.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Bogdanovich has been so smooth and loving in his directorial attentions that he has forgotten to give the tragical farce proceedings any terrible momentum.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This is ultimately a conversion melodrama, and a clumsy one. But until it goes to hell, it's thrillingly good, a fervid answer to the spate of cop movies that glorify brutality and sanction ends over means.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Hoffman has wedged the play into a weirdly inapposite setting, has stupidly cut and even more stupidly embellished it, and has miscast it almost to a player. And yet the damn thing works: Shakespeare staggers through, mutilated but triumphant.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Matt Damon can't quite piece together a compelling poseur.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Whose idea was it to turn Minority Report into a mushy declaration of humanism? It ends up as less of a warning about an Orwellian police state than a protest that Pre-Cogs are people, too. It's Dick-less.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's bursting with goofy banter, Hollywood in-jokes, sexy love scenes, and chases that go on much too long but have the kind of madcap self-indulgence that makes questions of logic or credibility seem dull-witted. It's a great piece of mindful escapism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Becomes increasingly unwatchable -- not just bleak but punishing, as if the director wants to fry your circuits along with his characters'.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is repetitious, crudely dramatized, and awkwardly acted -- in English, which seems to be the second or third language of everyone involved -- Yet the movie, heavy-handed as it is, serves as a powerful rejoinder to “Blind Spot.”
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's sensationally well-made: skittery and kinetic, packed with mayhem, yet framed (and narrated) with witty detachment, so that the carnage never seems garish. The film is far from a work of art, but it marks the emergence of a great new action superchef.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    She's (Jolie) the most amazing special effect in movies. The best thing in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider is a bungee-jumping ballet that Lara performs late at night in her mansion, soaring high and low in Japanese silk pajamas and with her hair pulled tightly back.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's Miyazaki's use of sound--and silence--that takes your breath away
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's a measure of Brooks' stature that he survives the self-sabotage and comes through with his most engaging performance in years.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A slender thing, with a perversely undernourished color scheme: grainy blue exteriors and old-time sepia interiors. The fullness comes from the faces of its two protagonists.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Ultimately, it has less in common with "Blair Witch" than with such quivering lumps of sentiment as "Ghost" and Field of Dreams."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This is a star-making performance, as fresh and funny as Christopher Reeve's in Superman (1978).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I'm not turning cartwheels over Adaptation as energetically as my colleagues. Part of me -- and I'm thinking aloud here, I've likely been infected by Kaufman's comic self-consciousness, and also by his meta-comic impulse to draw attention to that self-consciousness, and probably also by his meta-meta-comic impulse to draw attention to drawing attention to his self-consciousness -- that -- that --
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The inner life of the young Spider is just screaming to be taken to the next level--but Cronenberg mulishly won't go there. What goes wrong with Spider is pretty basic: The audience has no idea why it was made.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's scary to have to puzzle out a plot line scene by scene -- scary and exhilarating, at least for an hour.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The best thing about Seabiscuit is that it will make a lot of people hungry to read the book. They've seen the pretty pictures; now they'll want to enter the world.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Anything Else feels driven. It's like a rant from a therapist's couch--angry, unmediated, free-associational, unleavened by sentiment or compassion. And it's something else that Allen hasn't been lately: funny.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Adds up to a nice little gotcha! courtroom melodrama.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Billy Bob Thornton's performance is--there's no other word--beautiful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I love Nicholson here because he lets Keaton take the movie--and his relative reticence is very attractive.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is a testament to compromise, and so are the Farrellys' other movies--between the freakish pain of living and the wonderfully dumb gross-out slapstick that said freakishness makes possible.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Good, sometimes thrilling, but it's less a war epic than an evocative romantic melodrama with a patchy first hour.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Wing and director Peter Segal and Sandler and Barrymore have built a comedy around the thrill of first attraction, the sadness that comes from knowing it can't last, and the challenge of finding something in the heart to hang onto.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Uneven, ludicrous, but--oh man!--fun to watch.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    First-time director Richard Kwietniowski has fun with the collision of high and low culture, and he does elegant work.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Sometimes I wonder how Mamet can get out of bed, he's so paranoid, let along crank out two-thirds (at least) of a thriller this crackerjack. I hope that next time he leaves out the (booby) prize.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Haynes sets out to demonstrate the power of popular music to change people's lives--to tell them it's OK to fashion themselves into anything they please.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Creepily entertaining.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    No one rises above the material, though, except for Walken, who looks pleased with the paycheck and the top-shelf tequila. As a shady lawyer, Mickey Rourke is smooth and funny, but recognizable only by his familiar purr.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I had a fabulous time. Well, I did once I accepted that it was a campfest--a great Provincetown drag show of The Stepford Wives.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Napoleon Dynamite is too low-wattage to be a true nerd anthem, but it's charming in retrospect.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Bridges has evolved into a miraculous actor: one who signals wildness through the intensity of his containment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Pecker is a breezy, agreeable picture--a charmer, thumbs-up, three stars--but there's something disappointing about a John Waters film that's so evenhanded and all-embracing, even if its sunniness is "ironic."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's formulaic, but it sticks to a classic Western formula instead of a cartoonish blockbuster one.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film is smutty-mouthed and jumpy and free-associative, and Allen does everything but hurl his feces at the audience. The result is more rambunctious--and more fun--than any movie he has made in years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Beautifully made and unsurpassingly creepy, it's the rare remake with something contemporary to add.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This is not a movie to see if you're contemplating tying the knot; it's a hard slog for those of us already entwined.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Has spasms of silliness that thaw things out delightfully. Davis plays Vartan's girlfriend as an irrepressible, sexed-up brat, and gives every line a little hop, skip, and jump.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A bit of a philosophical muddle, but the climactic tennis scenes are galvanically convincing, with some long, nerve-racking volleys. And the rest of the picture works as "Notting Hill" (1999) with balls--and rackets.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The comic high point in Shaun of the Dead comes when Lucy Davis, from the great BBC sitcom "The Office," teaches the band of survivors how to lurch like zombies so that they can pass among the undead.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    But there are scenery chewers and there are Michelin-gourmet scenery chewers, and Pacino has a three-star feast.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Lee views these mortal fools with a sorrowful detachment. He's a sort of clinical humanist, editorializing only by what he leaves out. The downside of this method is its impersonality, which limits our involvement. The upside is its lack of cheap sentiment, and its clarity.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Saw
    Less a classical narrative than an ingenious machine for inducing terror, rage, and paralyzing unease.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I like my SpongeBob a little less lumbering, a little more free-associational, without that big, heavy anchor of a story structure to weigh him down.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The music ties together all the pretty pictures, gives the narrative some momentum, and helps to induce a kind of alert detachment, so that you're neither especially interested nor especially bored. Perhaps that's a state of Buddhist enlightenment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It manages to be funny and charming while capturing a lot of disturbing things about the way we live now.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Has a nonsensical twist ending that almost wrecks it, but until then it has enough fast, hyperliterate venality to make it great fun.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's depressing that this first movie in years to dramatize the American Revolution has so little to do with the politics of secession and so much to do with pop-culture themes of vigilantism.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Simply a jolly good (k)night out.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is diverting enough -- it's good fun -- but much of the genius is gone with the wind.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Head-On doesn't sound like a lot of fun, but it keeps you on edge, laughing nervously, appalled and, against all odds, entertained.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What a gutsy, sad, seize-the-day, glorious life it was for the women warriors of Lipstick & Dynamite.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    At times, the picture evokes such stylized musicals as "The Band Wagon"; at others, it seems to whirr every kung-fu movie ever made into the most luscious action smoothie you'll ever imbibe.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I can't think of too many actors who could bring off Jim Winters. LaPaglia manages to convey, wordlessly, the man's inner struggle.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    An extremely pleasant, consistently amusing diversion that is never as uproarious as you might hope. But don't panic, as the Guide would say. In a pinch, it will do.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    All along we've known that the contest was a metaphor for getting your act together BEFORE taking it on the road.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's a good, thoughtful horror picture--and thiiis close to being a very good one.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What makes Alice Wu's debut so pleasurable is its easy rhythms, its sly juxtapositions, and its relaxed but funny performances.

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