David Edelstein

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For 1,858 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Adventures of Tintin
Lowest review score: 0 Movie 43
Score distribution:
1858 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I was utterly gripped by The Italian. The only problem is that I was rooting for the bad guys.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Rivette has aged into one of cinema’s most ingenious minimalists. In The Duchess of Langeais he uses intertitles--bits of literary exposition--with cheeky understatement.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Although Paltrow is radiant (and she nails the character’s ditzy sense of entitlement), it's Phoenix's movie. He is, once again, stupendous, and stupendous in a way he has never been before.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    I loved it. Or, to put it another way, I loved it, I loved it, I loved it. I loved every gorgeous sick disgusting ravishing overbaked blood-spurting artificial frame of it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The band's implosion and reassembly makes for one of the most marvelous rock documentaries of all time.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's a crackerjack ride, shot and edited for maximum discombobulation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Joe
    You can be of two minds about the movie’s climax without shame. It’s galvanizing and, after all the accumulated tension, longed-for. And it’s too easy. And it’s rousingly well done. And it’s cheap. And that’s what makes the vigilante myth so vexing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Cooper's performance is outlandishly great, but Phillippe’s knocks Breach down a peg.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Hanks and Zemeckis (and writer William Broyles Jr.) are so intent on making an epic of the spirit that they can't bring themselves to acknowledge the comic, narcissistic side of their desert island fantasy. And so on simple, human terms, the picture gets all gummed up.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    This is finally the zombie flick as cautionary political tale, and as humanist parable. It's not the flesh-gouging zombie we have to worry about, the filmmakers suggest, but the soul-gouging zombie within.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    This isn't just the most riotously inventive movie of the year, it's the raunch anthem of the age.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Araki is trying to work from the inside out; and he captures feelings about sexual exploitation that I've never seen onscreen--not all of them negative.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    With all the narration and fits of slow motion, the movie seems like the work of a nervous chain-smoker. It lacks concentration--and with it, the potential for rapture.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Any war picture in which the heroine stalls the villain with a quiet, painstaking tea ceremony until the wind shifts direction and the good guys can firebomb the bad guys into oblivion is too ineffably Zen not to love.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Rust and Bone doesn't come together, but it's a triumph of non-actorish acting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Too often, it’s the MOVIE that isn’t there. What’s meant to be archetypal comes across as superficial.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Young Edie Martin, with her chaotic swarm of red ringlets and deadpan dutifulness (she has few lines, but they’re goodies), is the movie’s sign of eternal spring--the butterfly atop the just-opened blossom.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The film is marvelous fun on its own terms -- I laughed all the way through it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The sequel is simply a tour-de-force of thriller filmmaking.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Roberts has her most galvanic role, and she's sensationally appealing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What’s on display here is a great actor at his absolute peak — damn it all.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Even with all its elisions and distortions it tells a cracking good story. Turing is played with captivating strangeness by Benedict Cumberbatch.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A gratifyingly slick and fast-moving Flemish thriller, directed by Erik Van Looy, with superb acting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Has a soft windup, but along the way are some of the best-constructed slapstick sequences since "There's Something About Mary."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Super-entertaining, super-disgusting documentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Le Week-End is a marital ­disintegration–reintegration drama that opens with a dose of frost and vinegar and turns believably sweet—and unbelievably marvelous, in light of what had seemed a depressing trajectory.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    If you’ve never seen a Johnnie To crime picture, Exiled is a simple, stylish, and utterly delightful introduction.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Good, sometimes thrilling, but it's less a war epic than an evocative romantic melodrama with a patchy first hour.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    [A] compelling film touching on the perils of being young - that's it, merely young - in a culture without justice.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Quite pleasant.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It proves that male action stars can triumph not only over space but, more important, over time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Frank's writing is razor-sharp, his filmmaking whistle-clean. As a fan of sharp razors and clean whistles, I enjoyed The Lookout--yet I did feel let down by the climax, which ought to have been blunter and messier and crazier and more cathartic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Beyond the Mafia-like code of silence, it comes down to this: The guys at the top reserved their compassion for priests like Father Murphy in the belief that the boys were young and would get over it. No one of true faith will get over Maxima Mea Culpa.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is wonderful, nonsensical fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Before you quite know what’s happening, you’re swerving into another sort of movie altogether. And then another. You might not buy them all, but what a great ride.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    This is an absolutely miraculous movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This is a star-making performance, as fresh and funny as Christopher Reeve's in Superman (1978).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A tender, even-tempered elegy to a writer who at his peak could ingest staggering (literally) amounts of drugs and alcohol and transform, like Popeye after a can of spinach, into a superhuman version of himself--more trenchant, more cutting, more hilarious than any political journalist before or since.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    The Camden 28 is slapdash: more talking heads, reunion footage with the mother reading from her own testimony, newscasts of the day. But the editing supplies some urgency, and the subjects remain radiant yet down-to-earth--too good-humored to be beatific.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Too long, too sexist, and too--shall we say--flaccid. But it has its moments.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's one of the best kinds of documentaries--not calculated but serendipitous.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    One of the more lyrical sci-fi action thrillers ever made, in which space and time become love slaves to the directors' witty visual fancies.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It's the human struggle that makes this a sci-fi masterpiece.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie's evolution from somber spiritual torment to icky body horror to fetishistic sex to wild lyricism (vampires pogoing off buildings) to Grand Guignol splatter is exhilarating.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Anyone who loves live-wire acting will gasp in awe at Blanchett, more emotionally exposed than ever, and, most of all, at Dame Judi, who’s so electric she makes you quiver.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s a cracker­jack piece of filmmaking, a declaration that he’s (Eastwood) not yet ready to be classified as an Old Master, that he can out-Bigelow Kathryn Bigelow. Morally, though, he has regressed from the heights of Letters From Iwo Jima (2006). In more ways than one, the Iraq occupation is seen through the sight of a high-powered rifle. The movie is scandalously blinkered.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Law gives a doozy of a performance: He's fond of bulging his eyes, curling his head like a gargoyle, and displaying a set of rotten yellow teeth. This is some of the most flamboyantly bad acting since Brad Pitt in "Twelve Monkeys" (1995). An Oscar nomination would appear inevitable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Casey Affleck has never had a pedestal like the one his brother provides him, and he earns it. His Patrick is pale and raspy, with a slight grogginess that gives him an astounding vulnerability--and makes his bursts of temper shocking.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's better to think of Magic Mike as arty but energetic soft-core porn, with no pickle shots but plenty of juice. You should see it if only for McConaughey, an underrated leading man who finally gets a chance to use his strange timing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    Straight Outta Compton is among the most potent rags-to-riches showbiz movies ever made.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    As the father-in-law, Langella has one of those thankless antagonist roles — the rigid, killjoy patriarch — that older actors take for the paycheck and almost never pull off. As usual these days, he’s remarkable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Is it scary? Not especially. But there are enough gory surprises around every bend to keep you laughing/screaming/cringing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    This is a dazzling movie, yet some people (not kids, but maybe their parents) will be put off by its Grand Guignol ghoulishness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The compact Hennie is a wonderful actor, smoothly congenial when confident, uproarious when rattled. And he will be rattled-as well as stabbed, shorn, bitten, mangled, and worse.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Pure misery.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Something appalling about the way he turns to the camera with a look of sorrow: Michael Moore as a suffering Christ. It's an insult to his own movie, which at its considerable best transcends his thuggish personality.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is ludicrous, but Eastwood’s consistency is poignant. He has an agenda and sticks to it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The best thing about Seabiscuit is that it will make a lot of people hungry to read the book. They've seen the pretty pictures; now they'll want to enter the world.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Little here is new, but the archival footage is well chosen, the interviewees are illuminating, and Gibney, as usual, potently synthesizes what’s out there.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Pi
    This is very much a first feature, with all the hyperbolic, sometimes indiscriminate cinematic energy of a student film. But it's also sensational, a febrile meditation on the mathematics of existence.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    This wistful little film is at just the right temperature.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Fascinating for the issues--ethical, aesthetic, psychoanalytic--it raises. But it doesn't fully come together.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Guillermo del Toro is in a class with Peter Jackson as a fan-boy who gets it--a brilliant filmmaker who has a kind of metabolic connection to horror and sci-fi that helps him transform secondhand genre material into something deep and nourishing. Del Toro reaches into himself and finds the Wagnerian grandeur in schlock.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Their amalgamations can be feats of genius, like their stoner-gumshoe farrago "The Big Lebowski." Or they can pretty much lie there, like much of their new, star-packed comedy, Hail, Caesar!, which is nothing but movie fodder.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    Igby Goes Down got a reaction from me: I think it's the movie of the year. I squirmed, I laughed a lot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Is the movie good? It’s hard to be objective. The plotting is clunky and nonsensical, but Abrams and crew bombarded me into happiness. More than that, they made me feel so special for getting the in-jokes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The comic surface of Kiss Kiss Bang Bang is all polished brilliance, with surprisingly few dull patches...The movie doesn't deliver in the kiss-kiss department, though.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie belongs to Gordon-­Levitt and Anna Kendrick as his painfully green therapist.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film is freaky, amusing, and sickening in equal measures—part fly-on-the-wall vérité, part multiple-perspective Altmanesque tragicomedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It would be easy to dismiss as 100 percent ersatz if it didn't rekindle at least some of the old excitement - and if the magic of Spielberg's older movies didn't filter through, like light from a distant galaxy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    Spielberg has been ridiculed for shooting his actors from below against impossibly Spielbergian skies and a denouement that lays the love on copiously. But there's nothing simpleminded about how he uses movie magic, as a spell to dispel nihilism, to save us from the worst of ourselves by summoning up the best.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    There is a special kind of pleasure in hearing jokes that have no redeeming social value. I'd like to think that this IS their social value-an invitation to free the mind.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Lisa Kudrow does a dazzling turn as a guidance counselor who's a flickering mixture of sympathy and narcissism. But the movie belongs to Stone, that gorgeous, husky-voiced redhead.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It's a remarkable film--one to gnaw at you and keep you up at night.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Kargman is light on her feet, and she has chosen to follow a fascinating group of kids preparing for the 2010 Youth America Grand Prix.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Each film in Nicolas Winding Refn's mesmerizingly brutal Pusher trilogy can stand on its own, but it's fun to see all three and observe the way the bad guys in one become the sympathetic heroes (or anti-heroes) in another.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Occasionally you see a documentary and it hits you how much you don’t know about someone who was part of your mental landscape.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Menzel’s touch is sprightly, lyrical, mischievously understated.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It's a magnificent achievement—holes, tatters, crudities, screw-ups, and all.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Apart from a few choice flashbacks, the action is crawlingly linear--and opaque.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    There's something too refined and emotionally neutral about Nowhere in Africa, as if Link had directed with white gloves. Maybe she knew how loaded this African-Jewish subject was and didn't want it push it too hard. Maybe that's why she won an Oscar.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    As Nash gets closer to Crowe's own age (and level of dissipation), the performance settles down and becomes first credible and then overwhelming. This is a stupendous piece of acting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Inland Empire is way, way beyond my powers of ratiocination. It's the higher math.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The Woodsman should be pretty intolerable, but the writing-line by line-is heartfelt and probing, the direction gives the actors room to stretch out, and the performances are miraculous.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    McQueen films his characters like specimens in a jar, but the stakes are so high that the actors deliver.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    If The Theory of Everything cut as deeply as Redmayne's performance, it might be on the level of "My Left Foot." But there are so damn many problems, easy to ignore at first in the elation of watching Redmayne and the gossamer Felicity Jones as his future wife, Jane, but impossible to shake off in the last third.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    This is a rare case in which Marvel has freed a director’s imagination instead of straitjacketing it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The world didn't need a remake of The Thomas Crown Affair. We didn't need it, but we got it anyway -- and it's pretty terrific.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The German reserve and Italian extroversion are in just the right balance. The movie exists on a tantalizing border -- and I don't mean Switzerland.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    In spite of its standard biopic gaps and simplifications, Walk the Line gets the big things right.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I'm not sure what Kontroll adds up to, but if you're looking for a rackety journey into the bowels of urban life, this is your movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's Jordan’s feat to make a linear, talking-heads documentary (among the heads are Jonas Mekas, Robert Wilson, John Waters, Nick Zedd, and John Zorn) that still manages to evoke something of Smith's floating, ravishingly colorful dreamscapes--a menagerie of creatures that, even as they're captured on film, are already fading into the air.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Lee views these mortal fools with a sorrowful detachment. He's a sort of clinical humanist, editorializing only by what he leaves out. The downside of this method is its impersonality, which limits our involvement. The upside is its lack of cheap sentiment, and its clarity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The Kill Team, an essential film no matter what your political convictions. The setting is Afghanistan, but it might be Iraq or Vietnam or anywhere with occupying forces. It might be Gaza. This map of hell is timeless, placeless.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    For all its portentousness, this is the best Harry Potter picture yet. In some ways, it improves on J.K. Rowling’s novel, which is punishingly protracted and builds to a climactic wand-off better seen than read.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What makes this an important film is the way it puts you in that landscape and in those shoes, so that you almost understand how ordinary human beings can be impelled to do inhuman things.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Manito is the rare little movie that gets bigger as it goes along--so big that it can hardly contain its own emotion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    As the ghouls evolve toward humanity and the humans toward ghouldom, we can appreciate Romero for using horror to show us How We Live Now, and How We're Living Dead now, too.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    A warm, ingratiating, and fitfully hilarious epicurean road movie with a steady ache-an ache like a red-wine hangover.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is very beautiful, with a shambling pace and slow fade-ins and fade-outs; and when it works there's a tension between its characters' scuffling small-talk and its majestically ruined rural setting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    To work onscreen, Thank You for Smoking needed to be fast, scruffy, and offhand. But even the good lines here last a self-congratulatory beat too long. Aaron Eckhart is likable, but he's too hangdog and naturalistic for a part that could have used a brisk young Jack Lemmon type.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    After half an hour or so of ... stutter steps, Pete's Dragon starts working on you, much like those gold standards of the boy-and-his-otherworldly-friend genre, "E.T." and "The Iron Giant."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie gets funnier and less obvious as it goes along, and Zooey Deschanel is a hoot as a disdainfully bored co-worker who ritually insults the zombie chain-store shoppers -- but what is The Good Girl saying, exactly?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The glibness exhausts you, and the Coens are emotionally so far outside their subject that Intolerable Cruelty is finally no different from most of the other dumb slapstick spoofs that pass for screwball comedy these days.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    All over the map, but it's worth enduring the botched gags, formula plotting, and even the racism to marvel at the genius of Robert Downey Jr.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film is a canny balancing act, making Koch's arrogance so plain that you quickly move past it and concede that he accomplished remarkable things for a city that was broke and in chaos and with much of its housing stock in ruins.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A minimalist exercise in maximalist suspense.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What makes My Brother Is an Only Child so alive and entertaining is how it dramatizes the endless tug-of-war between political conviction and personal experience--the way the lines twist and blur and finally implode.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s probably no great loss, but here and elsewhere the seams show. And in this sort of movie it’s often more fun before we get our bearings and have time to say, “This makes no sense.”
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Say what you will about Mad Mel Gibson, he’s a driven, febrile artist, and there isn’t a second in his war film Hacksaw Ridge — not even the ones that should register as clichés — that doesn’t burn with his peculiar intensity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    At its best, 22 Jump Street is less an action comedy than a loosely plotted revue, and though it’s not as witty as either Joe Dante’s "Gremlins 2: The New Batch" or Edgar Wright’s "Hot Fuzz" (in which the directors evinced genuine love for their chosen genres), it’s sure as hell better than a straight buddy-cop sequel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    The movie spreads bad vibes like a virus.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Fitfully haunting and impressive: a little less loitery and opaque and it might have been a classic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    An appropriately generic title for a droning, high-toned little heist picture with no dash and no raison d'être.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    All along we've known that the contest was a metaphor for getting your act together BEFORE taking it on the road.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    David Fincher's American remake of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo adds nothing to the previous adaptation, but it's certainly the more evocative piece of filmmaking.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    I can’t decide if Kurzel’s Macbeth is worse than the geriatric Maurice Evans–Judith Anderson version I was forced to endure in high school, but it’s certainly less lively than the two terrible gangster updates, Joe Macbeth and Men of Respect.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Moment to moment, Sleepwalk With Me is smooth and very entertaining, but it's arrested somewhere between fiction and autobiography.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    For all the artfulness, the feel of the film is rough-hewn, almost primitive. It’s a fabulous tree house of a movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    There are times when Dafoe's accent strays into Billy Crystal Yiddish, but the notion of Vlad the Impaler aging into a finicky old Jew has its own kind of piquancy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's too bad that halfway through, Collateral turns into a series of loud, chaotic, over-the-top action set pieces in which the existentialist Mann proves he's lousy at action.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    This is a movie that sends you out shuddering, chuckling nervously, wanting to tell the people in line for the next show, "It's the feel-bad movie of the year!"
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    There isn’t a single false scare. There isn’t, come to think of it, a scare that doesn’t set up another scare.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Creepily entertaining.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is a passable entertainment -- call it The Half Monty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    No wonder Hawke was so hot to pass the script onto Linklater. He's superb, by the way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I urge you not to pass up Black Book, especially on a wide screen. It's a marvelous movie-movie, with a new screen goddess. Van Houten has a soft, heart-shaped face on top of a body so naturally, ripely beautiful it has its own kind of truth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s a wobbly, uneven, ultimately wonderful film — its unevenness befitting its title character, who we come to love despite her loopy lack of awareness of her own deficiencies.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Like Crazy has a lively syntax and could, in an ungrateful mood, be tagged as slick. But Doremus gets the tempos right.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Kohn’s gripping Manda Bala is the opposite of a high-school science doc. It’s a free-form portrait of a place--Brazil--with scary running motifs: kidnapping, mutilation, plastic surgery, bulletproofing, and frog farming.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Outrageously entertaining.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The smartest, funniest, and best-looking sci-fi comedy since the movies learned to morph.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    At its best, the movie evokes that blend of thrill and terror that comes from mixing two chemicals together without being sure that an instant later you'll still be standing there in one piece.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It's hard to know whether to marvel or weep when James Carville goes into his Bill Clinton–meets–Looney Tunes act in Rachel Boynton's knockout documentary Our Brand Is Crisis--the context is so morally topsy-turvy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is broad and mean and for a while very funny, but even when it goes sour — when the world slaps them in the face for their sins — it doesn’t lose its momentum.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is satisfying, though -- at least by the standards of that depressing phenomenon, the superhero "franchise."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Went down like a slice of warm pecan pie topped with two scoops of Ben and Jerry's Bovinity Divinity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    A marvelous feat of re-imagination.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    The elements in A Walk on the Moon, which is directed by the actor Tony Goldwyn (the bad guy in "Ghost") and written by Pamela Gray, feel miraculously right.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    What the film does have is coruscating anger, impish wit, and a breathtaking style.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Transcends its murkiness and eats into the mind. Cure is what ails you.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    I’m not sure Morris clinches his case, but I’m not sure he wants to: His aim is to throw a monkey wrench into the cogs of our perception.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I Love You, Man is totally formulaic, but the formula is unnervingly (and hilariously) inside out.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The problem — not fatal — with The Walk is that the narrative wire droops between the movie’s opening and final sequences.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A pungently funny and heartfelt piece of wish fulfillment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's the work of an old master summing up. It sure feels that way. The screenwriter, Anne Rapp, has provided Altman with a blueprint not only for an ensemble comedy but also for a comedy that honors the very idea of an ensemble. It's no wonder Altman fell on it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Ozon devises tantalizing scenarios and immerses himself completely--then seems happy to tread water.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Unexpectedly delectable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Ought to have been an eye-roller. What a surprise that it's so seductive. The Woodman lives!
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Public Enemies has incidental pleasures (its hi-def video palette is fascinatingly weird), but it’s only Depp’s sense of fun that keeps it from being a period gangster museum piece.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The Nice Guys has a nice feel: just slick enough to keep from falling apart, just brutal enough to keep from seeming inconsequential.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Attains a level of quiet grace. It's too bad that I can barely remember the movie after only a week. Nothing lasts, indeed.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Belongs to that most promiscuous of genres -- the go-for-it sports melodrama -- but transcends it and then some.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Thirteen has a way of smashing through your defenses. Hardwicke has goosed up the old melodramatic formula with a neorealist syntax and up-to-the-minute cultural nuances and violence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It's the only Almodóvar movie in which feeling, emotional or sexual, doesn't suffuse the imagery and hold the ramshackle melodrama together.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Science of Sleep transports you, but it strands you, too. Apart from the time-machine bit and two or three other daft exchanges, Gondry’s scenes tend to circle around the same drain: the hero’s insufferable narcissism.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It's a daring and original effort, yet so noncommittal--so purposely vague--that it's apt to leave you flummoxed: at once stricken and etherized.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 10 David Edelstein
    I found it so oppressively smug that I had to get up and pace the aisles three or four times, and I'd have bolted if I hadn't been duty bound to stick it out.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Honoré has proven you can make a movie musical in which style doesn’t upstage content--a movie musical that blossoms from the inside out.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Beneath the expensive, computer-generated busyness of this second Captain America installment is a bracing, old-style conspiracy thriller made extra-scary by new technology and the increasingly ugly trade-offs of a post-9/11 world.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Vigalondo demonstrates that even the dumbest genres can be used to profound ends — not cheapening serious things but kicking them to the next metaphoric level. A woman finding her inner strength is inspiring. But a woman finding her inner giant monster who kicks butt — that’s just so cool.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is too long (nearly two hours), but the acting--Gere, Molina, the peerlessly edgy Hope Davis, Marcia Gay Harden as Irving's loopy Swiss-German painter wife--keeps you giggling. And the story has something up its sleeve--a dream finish.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's so exciting to have a perfectly sung and acted Tosca (Avatar) on film that I'm prepared to forgive the new movie, directed by Benoit Jacquot, almost everything. But I sure wish Jacquot hadn't bungled the look and feel.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A truly unformulaic comedy of lust and greed, a farce that seems to write itself, slap-happily, as it goes along.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    As usual with Penn, I don't completely buy the character, but I completely buy that he has brilliantly internalized SOMETHING. He goes to some weird psychological places, our Sean.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    As Brown becomes more flagrantly self-destructive and at the same time more deluded, you realize you're watching "Bad Lieutenant" made by a tediously finger-wagging Jew instead of a tediously desecrating Catholic.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Like much of Soderbergh's recent work, Contagion feels a little sterile, more like a cinematic exercise than something with blood pumping through it. It's certainly high-minded - it might be the most high-minded disaster movie ever made.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's madly funny--a treat for moviegoers who don't mind gnawed-off limbs with their high jinks.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Billy Bob Thornton's performance is--there's no other word--beautiful.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The documentary could hardly be more timely or essential.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    In truth, I’m not sure the movie jells — even the title, from an album by The Smiths, seems oblique. But I loved it anyway.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It helps that Reilly is the opposite of a slob-comic. With his hangdog melancholy, he makes even the nonstop cunnilingus allusions poignant-the product of emotional longing.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    It’s a near masterpiece.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Downey found a way to channel his working-class audience’s anger against liberal shibboleths and not incidentally take down both his dad and his surrogate dad — Teddy ­Kennedy. It’s a ­riveting Oedipal tragedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Often howlingly funny, and the actors are a treat. But the underlying message is so suspect that it’s hard to suspend disbelief.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A jaw-dropper: a delirium-inducing crash course in international trash.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The parents are the casualties of Mills' misplaced sincerity, which makes Thumbsucker the quintessential misadapted head-scratcher.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Even more than his other genre mash-ups, this is a switchback journey through Tarantino’s twisted inner landscape, where cinema and history, misogyny and feminism, sadism and romanticism collide and split and re-bond in bizarre new hybrids. The movie is an ungainly pastiche, yet on some wacked-out Jungian level it’s all of a piece.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    In their last collaboration, "21 Grams," the director Alejandro González Iñárritu and screenwriter Guillermo Arriaga did syntactical acrobatics to disguise what a dreary and exploitive little soap opera they’d made. Their new movie, Babel, is more mysterious and less coherent.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    If there’s a sure thing in movies, it’s that if you cast Nicolas Cage in a role in which he goes crazy, he’ll rise to the occasion and keep on rising until he seems even loonier than his character.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    In addition to being fast, funny, and unpretentious, Brave is a happy antidote to all the recent films in which women triumph by besting men at their own macho games.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It might even have been a landmark film about race relations had its aura of blunt realism not been dispelled by a toxic cloud of dramaturgical pixie dust.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    There isn't a banal moment in Winslet's performance--not a gesture, not a word. Is Winslet now the best English-speaking film actress of her generation? I think so.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The most powerful aspect of this strange little movie is the sense that in an instant things could go very, very bad — even if they don’t. Palo Alto puts you on edge because it’s all dangerous corners.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    If nothing else, Training Day is a gorgeous pedestal for Denzel Washington.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Howard manipulates audiences without guile, jerking tears, piling on catastrophes, smoothing out dissonances, making bad characters badder and good ones gooder--and clearly believing that this is wholesome. At what he does, he's peerless. I wish I had more respect for what he does--and for myself the next morning for surrendering.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Duplicity is deeply shallow--cheap reversals all the way down. But it's a passably amusing brainteaser.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie makes for a good old-fashioned wide-screen wallow. Norton isn’t remotely credible, but Toby Jones is dandy as a sleazeball with a core of decency, and Watts is so open, so soulfully petulant, so transcendentally pretty, that even Maugham might reconsider the pleasures of the flesh.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Solondz conjures a world that's rotting away from the inside, in which only the children--freckle-faced Dylan Riley Snyder and Emma Hinz--weep over the loss of moral authority. This might be some kind of goddamned masterpiece, but I'm not sure I want to watch it again to say for sure.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The Unknown Known is a worthy addition to Morris’s body of work, an epic search that demonstrates the limits of language, the ease of sidestepping truth.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Even when you're able to guess the next calamity, it's still a shock in its ejaculatory intensity. The Farrellys never throw in the towel. Pretentious Sundance independents could learn a lot from such pistols.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Sour and mostly feeble, with a depressingly curdled worldview. It bears no resemblance to Allen's surreal, open-ended comedies.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    When a movie wrenches you with the deaths of children then leaves you with nothing to take home but your confusion, it can make you thirsty for the blood of directors.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The Avengers is both campy and ­reverential. Comic-Con nerds will have multiple orgasms. I had a blast.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Venus in Fur is both kinky and can pass as a form of self-flagellation. One additional, not-small thing: It allows him to demonstrate, with a minimum of means, his superb craftsmanship.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    A feminist sitcom tricked up with garish violence and garrulous hit men.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The Slums of Beverly Hills never gels, but it has a likable spirit, and it's exceedingly easy on the eye, with lots of pretty girls and wry evocations of '70s fashions and decor.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The line between eeriness and tedium is fatally fluid.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie says that the rebellious spirit that generates art can also consume and destroy -- that there's no undangerous way to ride the tiger.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I’m only half-kidding when I suggest that you see the movie but leave (especially if you have kids) at what’s obviously the end of the first act. You’ll still get the dissonances, ambiguities, and portents of doom, along with much that is pure enchantment. And you won’t leave thinking the movie had been made by the Big Bad Wolf.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Philip Seymour Hoffman carries the movie. As the CIA operative who hates Communists and his myopic superiors in equal measure, he has a wily, don’t-give-a-shit drive that makes you wish he’d been in Baghdad in 2003.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    If time-travel is your thing, you learn to shrug off inconsistencies. You debate chicken-egg questions over drinks or dope and mull over all the permutations. You graph it. You wish like hell you had a time machine. You savor every discombobulating, ludicrous, thrilling second of Predestination.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Like his "Wendigo," the film has a lot of mumbo jumbo about ancient spirits revived and angered by human disrespect--the old Indian-graveyard paradigm, as clunky as ever. But the context is overpoweringly eerie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    A hilarious, poignant, lovingly ironic celebration of (Tammy Faye Bakker's) rise and fall and her refusal to be broken.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It’s smoothly written and smartly paced, and Michael Douglas is riveting.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The tagline for Tiller Russell’s riveting new documentary, The Seven Five is “Meet the dirtiest cop in NYC history,” which I suspect does a profound disservice to a lot of other NYC policemen, past and present — although none of them are likely to write letters of complaint.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The film does, however, have the best weapon in the world against the perception of slickness: an actress without a smidgen of actressiness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It has a bad, slapstick first act but by midpoint becomes strangely compelling, tapping into the fantasy of reliving one's high-school years (which did a number on us all) and getting it right.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    So how's the Mamet "Rocky"? Fast. Lively. In your face. Very watchable. And, like its predecessors, so bizarrely convoluted it barely holds together on a narrative level. But the underpinnings are consistent.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Exposed, abandoned, branded as traitors, the Wilsons finally have no choice but to tell their story, the latest chapter of which is this potent Hollywood melodrama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Most thriller writers don’t aim so high: You really have to grapple with Lehane’s vision to see how tiresome it is.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Kill Bill is about nothing more (or less) than its director's passion for the mindless action pictures that got him through adolescence. It isn't sex without love: It's an orgy with just enough love.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The movie has none of the smugness of "­American Beauty": You could dream of living in a world like this.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The film is repetitive, top-heavy: Wright blows his wad too early. But a different lead might have kept you laughing and engaged.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    This one is alive with discoveries--of locations, characters, the actors who embody them, and even the medium. In The Go-Getter, filmmaking itself feels like Manifest Destiny.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Operation Filmmaker doesn't quite shake out as a microcosm of the American-Iraq relationship, although Davenport cheekily toys with the conceit. But the movie is endlessly resonant.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It takes some time to realize we're in a maelstrom--going down down down into a saga of obsession, sadism, masochism, and codependency that was and remains one of the great, sick tabloid stories of all time.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Even a second-rate farce like Man Up can be a jolly pick-me-up. Its momentum alone made me very happy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Intimacy doesn’t answer the question, which makes it all the more tantalizing: This is an emotional puzzle movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    During the ghastly, surreal climax, I had fun closing one eye and with the other watching various ashen older men stumble toward the exit.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's an elegant, civilized, and deeply liberal piece of craftsmanship, with the sort of social conscience you rarely encounter in a modern American thriller.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Neither movie (Capote/Infamous) gives you the whole picture, but it's fun to see them both and rearrange the pieces in your head.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It’s better to have a well-made, unapologetic action-adventure like this one than a creepy stab at replication.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Satrapi’s parents ship her off to a French school in Vienna, but she’s rudderless, ungrounded. She’s drawn back to a devastated Tehran, where she can’t design a life, either. This great film, by Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud, is that life, designed. It freed her mind; it frees ours.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Powerful and then some.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Watching The Hunger Games, I was struck both by how slickly Ross hit his marks and how many opportunities he was missing to take the film to the next level - to make it more shocking, lyrical, crazy, daring.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Gallo’s movie is terrific, an original and disarming vision of a life that's all skids.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Breezy, brief, and often a howl.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    The performances are so terrible that it's hard to know whether Cronenberg wants to signal that much of what we're seeing isn't "real" or he has just forgotten how to write for hemoglobular flesh vessels--i.e., human beings.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Becomes increasingly unwatchable -- not just bleak but punishing, as if the director wants to fry your circuits along with his characters'.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Gibney does finally kick the focus off Abramoff to bemoan the legalized-bribery system that’s the rule, not the exception.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    As much of her (Steen) as there is, you'll want more.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Doubt is still overpowering; it took me a while when it was over to stop shaking. It's the dramatist’s business to sow doubt, to set down points of view that can't be reconciled, and Shanley makes visceral the notion that one can be right but never absolutely right, that doubt might be our last, best hope.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Pierrepoint is worth seeing for Shergold's attention to process and for all the ghoulish details.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The script, by Dan Fogelman, is unusually and gratifyingly bisexual - i.e., it boasts scenes from both the male and female points of view!
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    My only serious complaint about Deepwater Horizon is that it’s not quite the muckraker I’d hoped for.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Apocalypto turns into the best "Rambo" movie ever made. The worrisome part is that Gibson doesn't think he's making a boneheaded action picture. For him, torture and vengeance are the way of the world. This is Gibsonian metaphysics.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    Everything he did in live-action movies with rolling boulders and runaway convoys he does bigger and better - by a factor of ten - in every frame. At the end of two hours, my jaw ached from grinning.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The magnetic Alexander Skarsgard is the leader, Benji, a soft-spoken dreamboat, ever-direct but with a haunted quality, with something in reserve. Ellen Page gives a Lili Taylor–worthy performance (high praise) as a suspicious, abrasive young woman.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Johnny Depp makes a valiant stab at the part, but even with his hair thinned and lightened and his face hardened, Depp remains Depp: I never forgot I was watching a big star doing an impersonation. It’s as if the spirit of a psychopath like Bulger resists the camera. Or maybe the movie isn’t imaginative enough to penetrate his shell.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Whatever this universe is, you're inside it, with your mouth open, wishing that all sporting events could be this exhilarating, that all human bodies could work this way, that all simpleminded movies could be this mindfully empty-headed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    You wonder what he has up his sleeve in The Hateful Eight, but gorgeous as that sleeve might be, what’s up it is crap. The movie is a lot of gore over a lot of nothing. I hope that won’t be Tarantino’s epitaph.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Gooses you even in its barren patches and gets fresher and funnier as it goes along. It builds to a shriekingly funny (and scary) revelation and a dénouement so brilliant it's almost demonic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Howard might be a major actor. His DJay, though, is a major character in search of a major author.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The movie is a generic paranoid espionage fantasy, but its proportions are refreshingly correct. It moves quickly, adroitly, and without fuss.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I’d see a whole film about the adventures of Hader’s desperate-for-transcendence roadie. Unlike Popstar, it might actually go somewhere.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The story doesn’t feel dramatized. It feels pitched.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    It's probably easier for an ex-prosecutor known for macho threats to say he got caught screwing than for him to say he got screwed. But folks, he was reamed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    My chief complaint is that these mutants are a little--well, vanilla. I wish the X-Men had a touch of kinkiness to go with their weird abilities.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I’ve never seen a movie that so cunningly exploits our anticipation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    As a onetime dramaturg and Brechtian, I enjoyed the chin-wags and the glimpses of Streep in rehearsal--especially her quivering admission that she can't bear the thought of anyone seeing her process.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Directed by David Zellner from a script he wrote with his brother, Nathan, the film has its tender mercies, as well-meaning Minnesotans attempt to reach out to this preoccupied Japanese woman with almost no English.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    A somnolent load of wank.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The segments are essentially monodramas, so sketchily written that the big moments feel less like recognizable human behavior than recognizable screenwriter overreaching.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    What a shock when George Lucas finds his footing and the saga once again takes hold.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    What makes Fracture hum is the way Hopkins bares his teeth, twitches his nostrils, and trains his shiny pinprick Lecter eyes on his co-star.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It will resonate with anyone who has ever buried a loved one and struggled to reconcile the myriad emotions--grief, anger, helplessness. Which is to say, everyone. And yet out of this premise comes glop. Departures needed a little more work in the morgue--like cutting to the bone.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A pandering, debased, generic little nothing of a movie. And I'm still trying to figure out why I loved it so inordinately.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    A sturdy piece of work, an old-fashioned conversion narrative with some high-tech zip.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    For these kids to sing and dance with all their hearts, they need to go to a place in themselves that should be closed down forever. The glories of War/Dance are torturously won, and all the more glorious for it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    It’s Aronofsky’s least personal work. So you get a fat dose of conventional melodrama with your Old Testament: It’s the antediluvian "Gladiator."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Page is softer than in "Hard Candy" and "Juno." Without Diablo Cody comebacks, she’s even more marvelous.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Praying With Lior engages us on so many levels it transcends its middle-class Jewish milieu.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It's on the verge of being really good...his narrative peters out without a decent payoff. It's a testament to the rage and anxieties that he has brilliantly tapped into that he can't get away with a subdued conflagration and a lame twist at the end.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    For all the movie's pixilated transitions, fisticuffs, and hyper-alert climaxes at the roulette table, there's a kind of temperamental evenness that's perfectly in sync with the protagonist.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    But even with bits that are crazily inspired, Forgetting Sarah Marshall is depressing. The Apatow Factory is too comfy with its workers’ arrested development to move the boundary posts. If they could find scripts by female writers that dramatize the other side of the Great Sexual Divide, it might be a place of joy--and embarrassed recognition--for everyone.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Scene by scene his (David Gordon Green’s) new film, Snow Angels, isn’t terrible. Parts of it are amusing, and there are wintry images that eat into the mind. But it’s one of the most disjunctive things I’ve ever sat through.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Robot & Frank, like its protagonist, is charming enough to get by with the sleight-of-hand. Its irresponsibility redeems it - it's a raspberry blown against the dying of the light.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    For In Bruges to click, McDonagh needed either to get more real or more fake.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's heartbreaking how rich this failed project is, with enough poetry for several great movies, but not enough push for one.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    As Bolt, John Travolta is inspired: His voice still cracks like an adolescent’s, and he has the perfect dopey innocence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It doesn’t have the youthful kick of its predecessor, but given the pervasiveness of addiction and suicidal ideation and despair it’s amazingly buoyant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Some of that fun is infectious. For a while. Maybe 45 minutes. But when actors look as if they’re having a better time than you are, the buzz wears off fast. You turn into a wallflower at an especially obnoxious party.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Bridges has evolved into a miraculous actor: one who signals wildness through the intensity of his containment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Batmanglij keeps the movie even-keeled, full of medium close-ups, underscored by ambient plinks and shimmers, with nothing to break the trance until a last scene that upends everything we thought we knew.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It has vivid characters, a strong sense of place, and a free-floating hopelessness that never precludes the possibility of meaningful action.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The movie is diverting enough -- it's good fun -- but much of the genius is gone with the wind.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    Spike Lee is a virtuoso filmmaker, a wizard at selling a sequence, but he'll never make an entirely coherent movie until he learns to go deeper into his subjects instead of wider with them.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    At its best, 25th Hour is a melancholy tone poem -- But the movie is also muddled by its own ambitions. There is simply no connection between the themes of Benioff's screenplay and 9/11, and every time Lee over-inflates the story, he loses its real pulse.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It delighted me; it disgusted me. I celebrate it; I lament it. I'm sure of only one thing: that I don't trust anyone--pro or con--who doesn't feel a twinge of doubt about his or her responses.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    The chronology is confusing at times, but the film is never not fascinating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The movie should be seen with a large, responsive audience--the better to live with it in the moment instead of worrying about where it’s going.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    An extraordinarily potent brew.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Am I the only one who finds the substance of this movie repulsive?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Soderbergh tends to get one big idea - a thesis idea - per film and stick with it even when a touch more flexibility would help. Here it's that non-kinetic camera, which he's so wedded to that parts of the film seem underenergized, like a cheap seventies or early eighties picture you'd catch at two in the morning on Cinemax's tenth most popular channel.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    I was happy watching these actors, happy going behind the scenes of a sober classical music ensemble instead of another druggy rock group, happy hearing Beethoven for a couple of hours. The movie is haut-bourgeois to the bone, but so am I: Let's hear some chamber music and have a little laugh and a cry!
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    It has a gritty feel and a tight, methodical, one-thing-after-another tempo.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Private Parts is so riotous that you almost don't remember how unfunny Stern can be on his radio show.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    It's tempting to praise The Ides of March as a realistic depiction of how low we've sunk. But that would mean accepting the second-rate writing and third-rate melodrama and incredible shrinking characters.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    That's the feeling Stephen Chbosky captures in The Perks of Being a Wallflower, his exquisite adaptation of his best-selling YA novel about a Pittsburgh high-school freshman who doesn't fit in and then all of a sudden does, for a spell.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Gregory and Demme have turned A Master Builder into (pardon my invoking the name of a Strindberg work) a dream play, and have made it once more madly, bitingly, chillingly alive.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    Say this for actors: Too self-centered to be embarrassed, they can be existential heroes of a (moronic) sort.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Furious 7 kicks the biggest and hardest, but it’s far from the best. Lin has handed the keys to James Wan, the cunning horror director of "Saw" and "The Conjuring," and though the thrill isn’t gone, the finesse is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It goes soft, but even a gelded traditional farce is more potent than most of our slob comedies.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Think "In the Mood for Love" with hookahs instead of chopsticks.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Stillman's comeback comedy Damsels in Distress is wobbly and borderline twee, but it deepens as it goes along and becomes rich.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    Might be the most provocative teen sex comedy ever made; it is certainly one of the most convulsively funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Hit and miss, but its tone of lyric melancholy is remarkably sustained.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Rich, finely judged, gorgeously acted movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    I suppose it's too much to expect Pirandellian stature from the madness of Chuck Barris -- but that's about the only thing that would have made this mixed-up ego trip work.

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