David Ehrlich
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For 68 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Ehrlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness
Lowest review score: 0 Exists
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 31 out of 68
  2. Negative: 19 out of 68
68 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 David Ehrlich
    A devastating and deceptively simple tale adapted from 10th-century folklore, Isao Takahata’s The Tale Of Princess Kaguya distills a millennium of Japanese storytelling into a timeless film that feels both ancient and alive in equal measure.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 David Ehrlich
    Building to an emotional wallop that’s almost on par with anything found in one of Miyazaki’s or Takahata’s films, The Kingdom Of Dreams And Madness is pornographically interesting for Studio Ghibli fans; as a delicate depiction of the artistic spirit, it’s equally essential viewing for everyone else.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 David Ehrlich
    Citizenfour offers a remarkably intimate look at history as it happened. In fact, the immediacy of Poitras’ film is so remarkable that, at least for the immediate future, her craft is likely to be overshadowed by her access, her storytelling overshadowed by her opportunity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 David Ehrlich
    The genius of Kikuchi’s performance is that – by the end – her slow descent into mania humanizes Kumiko precisely when it would have been so easy to reduce her into caricature.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 David Ehrlich
    For all of its provocatively cerebral ideas, the prevailing truth is that Goodbye To Language is actually a great deal of fun—not just to think about, but also to experience. It’s “Godard: The Ride.”
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 David Ehrlich
    While this is arguably Greengrass’ best film, it’s almost certainly his most urgent.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 87 David Ehrlich
    Palo Alto is one of the best movies ever made about high school life in America (admittedly a low bar), blurring the lines between how unique it is to be a teenager, and how universal it is to feel like one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 87 David Ehrlich
    An instantly and enduringly compelling documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 86 David Ehrlich
    A feral and staggeringly well-conceived revenge saga.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 David Ehrlich
    When Allen conceives of a character this great, it’s hard not to wish for him to slow down and maybe write that extra draft to refine his creation, but Blanchett – at once both repellant and eminently relatable – uses the casual tone to her advantage, the same way that monster movies use miniatures for scale.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 David Ehrlich
    The human imperative informs every aspect of After Tiller, resulting in an unexpectedly warm film.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 David Ehrlich
    Effectively portrays New York City as a cacophonous collision of disparate voices, sidestepping the nightmarish outcome of that child’s story in favor of a different, more enduringly visible disaster.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 David Ehrlich
    Rossi’s scathing (yet seemingly fair) documentary doesn’t just illustrate the institutional ironies of modern education. It also strives to understand why tuition is at an all-time high when knowledge is practically free.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 David Ehrlich
    The Expedition To The End Of The World courses with the zeal of Robert Flaherty, the fearlessness of Werner Herzog, and the fatalistic humor of Lars Von Trier. While individual moments echo with a familiarly mordant sense of alpha-male adventure, together they cohere into something wild and new.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 82 David Ehrlich
    Denis Villeneuve’s Enemy might have the scariest ending of any film ever made.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 81 David Ehrlich
    The Visitor might be a hot mess, the byproduct of tailspinning egos and the best drugs movie money could buy in the late 70s, but it certainly isn’t an accident.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 David Ehrlich
    Her
    If Her is ultimately better at considering the future than it is at taking us there, it resonates as an insightful reminder that love isn’t obsolete quite yet.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 David Ehrlich
    Fashioning "The Great Dictator" and "Inglourious Basterds" into a cross joint and then lighting it from both ends, Goldberg and Rogen’s second directorial effort follows the hysterically violent misadventures of idiotic talk-show host Dave Skylark (James Franco, hamming it up) and his underachieving producer, Aaron (Rogen).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Ehrlich
    The film is essentially a war of attrition between emotion and pragmatism, the rare thriller fueled by stress rather than speed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 David Ehrlich
    The ultimate value of the famed filmmaker’s latest documentary—a subject National Gallery turns into a reflexive concern—is not that Wiseman makes it possible for a broader audience to see these priceless works of art, but that the scope of his project invites all audiences to look at them through an illuminating new lens.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 77 David Ehrlich
    If Tom at the Farm is occasionally impenetrable as a drama, it’s seldom less than gripping as an exercise in suspense, especially when Dolan’s precise sense of timing revitalizes otherwise familiar moments.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    It’s curious that The Fake Case works best as a dark comedy, with one particularly memorable scene finding Ai sneaking up on a couple of newlyweds as they have their wedding photos taken and snapping a few of his own.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    What ultimately helps Citizen Koch rise above the dozens of other movies like it is a focus not just on recent developments in American politics, but also on the bedrock of what has made this country such an enduringly great, astoundingly troubled experiment: one person, one vote.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    If Miracle can be thought of as "Flags Of Our Fathers: On Ice," Red Army is its "Letters From Iwo Jima." Gabe Polsky’s film humanizes the players of the Soviet Union national team, who were humiliated by a ragtag crew of amateur college kids during the most internationally politicized game in the history of American sports.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 72 David Ehrlich
    The F Word would be commendable on the strength of its unusual wit and warmth alone, but it becomes a far more satisfying (even somewhat illuminating) experience because it doesn’t shy away from the often ugly psychology engendered by cross-gendered friendships.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Ehrlich
    While The Retrieval’s sense of place may ultimately be stronger than its sense of purpose, it works as the story of a young boy realizing his agency, and it galvanizes as the story of an independent filmmaker realizing another portion of his medium’s infinite potential.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Ehrlich
    Korengal isn’t a profound portrait of people fighting for our freedom, but a modest look at the human engine of the military-industrial complex.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Ehrlich
    Transitioning from Reservoir Dogs to From Dusk Till Dawn with a lunatic’s grace, Witching & Bitching resolves itself as a gloriously gory civil war between men and the grotesquely literal manifestations of how the worst of them see the fairer sex.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Ehrlich
    Canopy most convincingly creates the illusion of war when it narrows its eyes on the two men trying to endure it, and the urgency on their underlit faces is more transportive than the canned sounds of mortar fire.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 David Ehrlich
    Keep On Keepin’ On is packaged like a standard-issue music documentary—albeit one with an unusually palpable affection for its subject—but Alan Hicks’ debut feature resonates as a beautiful illustration of how people can find each other.

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