David Ehrlich

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For 421 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Ehrlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 EX LIBRIS: The New York Public Library
Lowest review score: 0 Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 65 out of 421
421 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    At its best, Prevenge feels like a hilarious distillation of every conflicted, politically incorrect thought that many pregnant women are too polite to share in public.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Rodrigo Plá's intermittently engaging A Monster With a Thousand Heads is unique for how it captures the urgency of a system that's designed to frustrate and confuse people into helplessness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Band Aid is a thin but knowing portrait of how marriages stretch, sag, and pull back together.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Rather than spend more time with the band, Traavik tries to milk additional drama from North Korea’s diplomatic tensions.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Decency, in its raw, instinctive form, is ultimately what earns The Zookeeper’s Wife a place in the self-conflicted canon of Holocaust cinema.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Django deserves credit for refusing to fit its subject into the straightjacket of a survival tale, and Ketab’s expressive turn — much of which is captured in close-ups — provides the story with a richness that the writing struggles to achieve on its own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Keep Quiet is far more compelling as a portrait of a man in transition than it is as a man reborn, but Blair and Martin never solve the problem that they only have access to the latter.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Shot with the stoic confidence of a capable young director flexing his muscles, Super Dark Times is visceral and gripping throughout, its probing compositions forcing you to peer deeper and deeper into the darkness.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    The first 25 minutes of this movie should be mounted as an installation at the Louvre and played on an infinite loop. Only then can our planet know peace.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Till spins a sloppy but uproariously clever urban fable, one that doesn’t sanctify or belittle the handicapped, but rather shines new light on that invisible population by inviting them to play the most visible of movie archetypes: assassins.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    The gentle, lushly visualized and exasperatingly diffuse Miss Hokusai is a missed opportunity in many respects, but it certainly does a magnificent job of validating its own existence.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    The action is never topsy-turvy enough for 13 Hours to be mistaken for a Paul Greengrass film, but it’s also not so operatic that it feels like Bay is turning a tragedy into Bad Boys III.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    The heat [Chow] conjures between his leads never rises above a low boil. That’s because Chow never bothers to pretend as if the romance really matters —it’s merely an excuse for a parade of blisteringly clever comic set pieces.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Fifty Shades of Grey is a sex-positive but hopelessly soft-core erotic drama that fails to be even a fraction as titillating as the E.L. James books that inspired it. And yet, that’s exactly why it works.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Urushadze’s excellent cast imbues their thinly drawn characters with a great deal of life, but the roles are so transparent that the film feels like more of an advertisement for peace than it does an argument for it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Horse Money is an ordeal, but you’ll be glad that Costa was there to help Ventura’s words find their way through the cracks.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    It hurts that most of the jokes fall short of their potential, especially because Headland refuses to milk easy laughs by winking at genre clichés, but her decision to play things straight helps clarify a truth at the heart of movies like this.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    It may not be for all tastes, but there’s genuine value in a feel-good film that works this well without making viewers feel bad first.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    The elliptical story of sibling despondency doesn’t quite hang together, though the groundswell of missed potential doesn’t come into focus until the film’s undeniably powerful closing moments.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    This is a bleak and bitter movie, but it knows the way forward, if not the quickest way to get there.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Any insight into Escobar’s relationship with the people of his country is sacrificed in the trade-off — Nick sees him as a charismatic Robin Hood who showers the poor in blood money that’s still dripping wet, but the film forgets the complexity of Escobar’s politics as soon as Nick realizes that he needs to escape. If only Paradise Lost gave us a better sense of what he was leaving behind.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    MacFarlane’s preference for quantity over quality results in a lot of dead air, but the gags that land are howlers, and all of its crudeness (and racism, and sexism, and homophobia, etc.), the movie beats with a real heart.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    All Is By My Side ends just as Hendrix is coming into his glory, but Ridley’s film—a remarkable showcase for Benjamin’s acting talent, and a terrible application of what Werner Herzog called “ecstatic truth”—is in the end a tragedy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Wenders’s reverent enthusiasm for his subject is evident throughout the film, and he details every chapter of Salgado’s life with an acolyte’s inability to separate the wheat from the chaff.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Unfortunately, this austere allegory for the difficult process by which kids start to think for themselves only hints at the turbulence of its characters, who are kept at too far a remove for us to feel their growing pains.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Whatever the film’s virtues, subtlety was never going to be one of them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    A dryly amusing mockumentary from the Kiwis behind the similarly deadpan Eagle vs Shark and Flight of the Conchords, What We Do in the Shadows unfolds like the darkest movie that Christopher Guest never made.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Spy
    Though it’s been two years since they collaborated on "The Heat," Spy makes the case that Feig and McCarthy are still just warming up.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Results is the work of an elusive talent who’s built his entire career on the strength of his curveball. This seriocomedy of self-improvement clarifies how all of Bujalski’s stories are unified by characters who are trying to camouflage their loneliness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Ehrlich
    Me And You is palpably frail cinema, its every movement heavy with its director’s strain and the reluctance of a kid shuffling off to do his chores. And yet it’s also compellingly clear that the movie has restored Bertolucci’s strength, just as it’s easy to see why this particular story was able to reach into the depths and rescue a titan of Italian cinema from his darkness.

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