For 528 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 77% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Fear's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Autobiography of Nicolae Ceausescu
Lowest review score: 20 Battle: Los Angeles
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 36 out of 528
528 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    To her credit, Howard’s performance as a class-obsessed Southerner is decent enough to keep things from completely devolving to community-college level. But such weak work needs strong hands all around to guide it, and one pair isn’t enough.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    The odor of musty, late-’80s nostalgia may still hover around this already threadbare brand, but you simply don’t see movies that leave both the curious and the fans who truly care this viscerally satisfied anymore.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    It’s gratifying to see Eisenberg move past nerdy-cutie parts; his slim shoulders, it seems, are capable of handling more than Michael Cera’s leftovers.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Just because you tart up a typical romantic comedy with trash talk doesn't make it edgy or real.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Becomes a clumsy gringo approximation of something else. In this case, it's the old respectable-man-obsessed-with-fallen-angel cliché, which Demy fils tweaks with broad melodramatic strokes and Freudian flotsam, as well as a complete lack of focus or storytelling chops.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Subversive elements or not, this is essentially little more than a TV soap opera spiced with hot-button topics (gender issues, clandestine gay trysts), and the combo of TV melodramatics and mumblecore-ish aesthetics eventually wears out its welcome.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 David Fear
    Such manic fumblings and desperate crassness might be more forgivable were any of it actually, y’know, funny, but other than Olivia Colman’s occasional cameos as a raging therapist, the laughs have been granted a leave of absence.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Old-school intrigue, informants and assassins, life-or-death pursuits in crowded places, characters who are adults and do not wear capes or pilot robots: This is pretty much what any filmgoer over the age of 13 pines for in the dog days of summer, so this courtroom melodrama/surveillance thriller should be manna.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    When Canet isn't dabbling in schmaltz, he's forcing text-message gags and metaphor-heavy vermin jokes down viewers' throats in a lame attempt at levity. Emotional fraudulence does indeed constitute a lie, just not a white one.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Given how prominent the postcard sultriness of her backdrop is compared with the story's emotional ping-pong, all she ends up with is a kinder, chicer Adrian Lyne movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    What's surprising is that Rogen and Streisand have a genuinely complementary chemistry, feeding off each other in a way that suggests that, given a halfway decent script, the two would make a better-than-decent screen duo.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Fear
    Alas, this isn't the Trump-trolling toon you're looking for. People may search for protest art hidden among the potty jokes, but the closest they're going to get to a subtextual statement is the Beatles' "Blackbird" on the soundtrack – and that's been repurposed as a lullaby.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Director Maya Kenig's film never decides whether it wants to be a social satire, a familial drama or a parable about Israeli life during perpetual wartime; that it neither picks a route nor cohesively combines any of those strands doesn't make a fairly generic father-daughter story any more colorful.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    It could have been so much worse; we wish it was a lot better.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Only Leo, always a dependable supporting actor, turns her character into something resembling a three-dimensional person. Watching her tentatively reconnect with her maternal instincts is a welcome surprise. Everything else here just feels like another descent into mediocre Amerindie miserablism.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Barkin may be the equal of Gena Rowlands or Liv Ullmann. Her director's clumsiness, however, suggests he isn't fit to hold Cassavetes's or Bergman's old camera cases.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    They quickly smother whatever greatness was inherent in the material. Faulkner’s vivid, tragic and tender world is nowhere to be found here, and it's a deal breaker by any other name.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Titillation and tentative stabs at gender studies do not a cogent cri de coeur make. It's simply a provocation that's all hopped up with nowhere to go.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Though Summer of Goliath has its share of grace notes and gorgeous shots, the anxiety of influence hangs heavy over every real-time interaction, every direct testimony, every re-creation (and re-re-creation) of allegedly true incidents.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Director Jeanne Labrune (Vatel) makes the most out of having a compellingly watchable movie star at her disposal, but neither some odd stabs at humor nor Huppert's versatility do much to enliven what's essentially a superficially sexed-up soufflé.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    The disparity only makes Reeves's earnest-but-monotonous turn that much more pronounced-and the film that much more dismissible.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Even by the stultifying standards of everything's-screwed ensemble movies, Joseph Infantolino's thirtysomething drama feels particularly threadbare.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    The pity is that the people in People Like Us ultimately don't feel any more dimensional than the archetypes dutifully dotting his lowest-denominator multiplex fodder. He's just picked a different set of clichés to ransack.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    A business-as-usual slog.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    After the novelty of these backgrounds and comin'-at-ya bits wears off, Mars Needs Moms has to rely on Fogler's obnoxious Jack Black Jr. shtick, a weak subplot involving a '60s-obsessed Martian graffiti artist (Harnois) and rote video-game-y action sequences to carry it along-and that simply won't cut it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Say what you will about this collection of less-than-feature-length films: There’s truth in its advertising. The sketchlike movies here are indeed shorts, and stars do lend their presence.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    You can’t deny the inspirational qualities of the story or Parker’s screen presence, any more than you could accuse the film of subtlety or of masking its conspicuous pro-Christian agenda.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Kudos to Evans for making up for the galling lack of gay African-American screen representation while delivering hot-body eroticism, but reducing complex relationship issues to a typical indie-flick blatherathon—complete with performances of varying quality and stilted dialogue—isn’t helping anyone.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Protektor is simply another in a long line of diluted stories about life during wartime, one whose diminished returns only further trivialize a legacy of real-life horror.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Shadows still functions as a study in superior sequel-itude, building a fine showcase for a reimagined character and the compelling, twitchy dynamo playing him. Should Ritchie ever learn to be elementary instead of epileptically overwrought, he may one day do proper justice to both.

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