For 510 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 20% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 78% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Fear's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Daisies (1966)
Lowest review score: 20 Why Stop Now
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 34 out of 510
510 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Whether anyone over the age of 16 will find the film's proud amateurism and choir-preaching personally enlightening, much less profound, is anyone's guess.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Ron Honsa's PBS-appropriate doc pays lip service to the utopian space's history, and features (too-)brief snippets of performances and modern-dance legends - Merce Cunningham, Mark Morris, Suzanne Farrell - praising the landmark.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    The question is, could someone turn these full-frontal-dudity snapshots into a satisfying, cohesive movie? Answer: no, but not for lack of trying.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Ugh! For a movie devoted to an alleged geek-rebel underdog, this coming-of-age flick couldn't be more conformist, from its familiar faux quirk to the interchangeable emo-pop songs peppering each sugary montage.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    It’s a waste, for sure — of talent and your time.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    In all aspects, The Girl can’t help it — this is headline-torn cinema du tearjerking at its most generic.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    The fact that director Darragh Byrne has laden things with a Celtic Whimsy 101 score and a sketched outline of a script makes it even tougher for Meaney to lift this film out of its social-drama rut.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    They're not doing themselves any favors by letting this oldie out of the vault.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    This could have been a true urban mosaic. Instead, we simply get a vision of Paris as the city of lite.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Vallée and his lead get high marks for kittenish revisionism. In all other respects, however, this movie is indistinguishable from every other throne-and-scepter biopic to hit the screen.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    You never lose the nagging sense that you're simply watching a high-school drama club's production of '40s fatalism chic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    As it is, this attempt at an Altmanesque ensemble piece feels a little dramatically flat even as it's dazzling your retinas.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Once this cultural exploration devolves into just a forum for grating geek griping and Jar-Jar Binks hatred, however, you'll wish you could escape to a galaxy far, far away.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    After the novelty of these backgrounds and comin'-at-ya bits wears off, Mars Needs Moms has to rely on Fogler's obnoxious Jack Black Jr. shtick, a weak subplot involving a '60s-obsessed Martian graffiti artist (Harnois) and rote video-game-y action sequences to carry it along-and that simply won't cut it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Despite toggling among the three characters' story lines, the film is barely concerned with the who, what or where of the incidents, much less a deeper why. It simply wants to milk this real-life example of courage (and chaos) under fire for multiplex thrills, reducing everything to a cheap adrenaline rush set to a pulsing soundtrack.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Just because you tart up a typical romantic comedy with trash talk doesn't make it edgy or real.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    There’s something admirable about the anything-goes energy that Van Peebles brings to this tall tale, but the amateurishness and Video Toaster–era technical tricks start to grate after a bit. It’s a funky, free-form fairy tale, but one that only a mutha could truly love.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Filmmaker Gérald Hustache-Mathieu has fun recasting Monroevian moments and setting up parallels between the fromage-hawking hottie and the late silver-screen sex symbol - bring on the Miller, DiMaggio and JFK avatars.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Thor accomplishes its essential goal and little else, which is to introduce the mighty warrior to the Marvel screen universe.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    No stranger to controversy, Fifth Generation Chinese filmmaker Chen Kaige (Farewell, My Concubine) has always taken his country to task over bureaucratic and social issues; here, the director goes after both old-media exploitation and new-media omnipresence, and the result is less than cutting.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Only Leo, always a dependable supporting actor, turns her character into something resembling a three-dimensional person. Watching her tentatively reconnect with her maternal instincts is a welcome surprise. Everything else here just feels like another descent into mediocre Amerindie miserablism.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    So it's the story of a down-and-out bigwig vindicating himself by revising his crowning cultural moment. Feel free to draw your own conclusions.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Only jackanapes and jackasses would deny that the experience of war can cause psychic damage, but does that mean we have to sit through such a schematic, dogmatic melodrama about the subject?
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Porterfield has proved he can do grit and atmosphere. Should the young director ever decide to channel this talent into storytelling with purpose and a point, he might be someone to watch out for.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Given how prominent the postcard sultriness of her backdrop is compared with the story's emotional ping-pong, all she ends up with is a kinder, chicer Adrian Lyne movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Strange Powers works best when inadvertently capturing the toll of living in the shadow of a genius. When it comes to examining the genius himself, it's woefully out of tune.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 David Fear
    Even if Women in Trouble didn’t keep bringing to mind a superior artist, the film would still be badly written (DOA tangents about cunnilingus and kink don’t make dialogue edgy, only vulgar), not to mention unevenly paced and an embarrassment to all involved.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 20 David Fear
    A veteran of the Saw franchise, Darren Lynn Bousman trades torture-porn antics for an old-fashioned Euro-horror vibe, complete with old dark houses and creepy maids; he then wastes what little suspense he generates with endless dorm-room philosophical debates about faith versus atheism and religio-conspiracy theories so far-fetched they'd embarrass Dan Brown.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 David Fear
    It’s just blinkered middle-class pandering at its most shameless.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 David Fear
    The film does offer some revealing anecdotes about his infamous Monroe sessions, but mostly, it simply slouches from one sensationalistic, salacious bit to the next, sans any historical context. Worse, filmmaker Shannah Laumeister continually rhapsodizes on-camera about her own “soul mate” relationship with the subject—leaving viewers feeling mad as hell.

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