For 504 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 20% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 78% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Fear's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 A Man Vanishes (1967)
Lowest review score: 20 Why Stop Now
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 96 out of 504
  2. Negative: 34 out of 504
504 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    It's only a slight exaggeration to say Kold gives what may be the performance of the year - one that not only offsets the movie's momentary dips into self-conscious quirkiness but adds a genuine sweetness to the proceedings. Forget the muscles; he brings the heart and soul.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    Lyrical touches and the most moving use ever of Katy Perry's "Firework" almost cancel out a cheap-shot third-act tragedy, yet it's the actors that save the film from soaping itself into Euro-miserablist irrelevance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    An Austrian actor whose Easter-Island mug has graced movies such as the Oscar-nominated "The Counterfeiters" (2007), Markovics shows a keen attention to performers that you'd expect from a thespian-turned-director.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    Push any guy long enough with alcohol and aggressive masculinity, the film suggests, and you'll find an XY-chromosomed predator lurking behind the mask.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    A cross-pollinated mixture of Hollywood-blockbuster bombast, Asian cool and '60s Vegas ring-a-ding swing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    If any film could convince people that ACID is the patron saint of tomorrow's Godards, it's this one.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    Its historical import as a peripheral civil-rights document can't be understated.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    Apted once wanted to give us "glimpses into Britain's future," per the archival-footage announcer. With this installment, he's delivered an intimate portrait of settling down and finally making peace with one's well-publicized past.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    These two trash-talkin’ Picassos may or may not end up getting their due, but Leon and his two extraordinary actors (especially Washington) have already put us squarely on the side of the beautiful losers regardless.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    This surreal, sentimental journey does provide an excellent encapsulation of everything Ruiz did best: oddball takes on highbrow lit and lowbrow genre conventions, guided tours of characters’ mazelike memory banks, and a reveling in film culture that doubles as a cinephile’s wet dream.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    As a macro- to micro-exploration of guilt—over giving in to sexual deviancy, its use as a psychological crutch or as something that keeps grief from transforming into closure — The Silence speaks volumes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    The sisterhood who have made this an art form mostly remain unsung heroes, as it were, of the hit parade. Their collective bow is long overdue.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    Mostly, you see a prolific artist going out playing—an unsentimental, salt-of-the-earth tribute that keeps the beat in a way that would make this extraordinary journeyman beam.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    The importance of Tiesel’s performance here can’t be overstated, and even during what is easily the most excruciating birthday-party scene involving cock ribbons ever, the actor lends an incredibly profound sense of sorrow to the film’s pitilessness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    Short Term 12 isn’t without drawbacks, occasionally dipping into a too-neat narrative tidiness and a self-conscious sloppiness. Yet the film’s charms and ability to cut through jadedness despite the subject matter makes it a rarity — a modest indie that’s feels like it’s in it for the long haul.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    You could spend a lifetime peeling the glass onion of Shirley Clarke’s merciless documentary, in which a born performer drops incinerating truth bombs while putting the con in confessional moviemaking.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    It’s both a sly piece of ethnography and a social satire that reads like a cosmic joke…right up until its climax makes the chuckle catch in your throat.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    It’s to the filmmakers’ credit that we also see how insecurity and proximity to fame both drove him and drove him crazy, resulting in a layered look at a man who was a jack of all trades, but a master of one: being George.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    Her
    It’s a tale of lonely souls and literalized online dating, and you assume filmmaker Spike Jonze will characteristically mix high-concept absurdism with heartfelt notions. Unexpectedly, the latter dominates, thanks in no small part to Phoenix’s nuanced, open-book performance.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    If Marcello Mastroianni’s character from "La Dolce Vita" hadn’t stepped off the sweet-life treadmill, this is exactly who he would have become.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    The real strength of Cohen’s occasionally didactic drama, though, is in the way the film redirects your focus to the periphery and reminds you of the richness that resides there. It was an achievement Bruegel mastered early on. And it’s what makes Museum Hours its own work of art.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    As you watch these actors, you appreciate the endeavor the climbers went through all the more — and as triumph turns to tragedy, you feel the grief winding its way through your shaken nervous systems.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    The more Shepard & Dark rewinds through their shared history, the more the film blossoms into something far richer than a simple tribute to a long, beautiful friendship—it becomes an ode to a long-lost era of bohemia, an insightful look into male psychology and pathology, a valentine to the art of letter writing and an illustration of how the past is never dead, because it’s not even past.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    The Square offers more than just pictures of a revolution; it lets you into the mind-set of those fighting for their future, and that makes all the difference.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    A first-rate piece of forensic filmmaking.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    Ping-ponging between grisly South of the Border carnage and Angeleno musician Edgar Quintero’s growing success as one of the subgenre’s stars, you start to see how this parasitic relationship works.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    For 91 minutes, the pleasure of the Guiteauxes’ company is ours. We are ultimately the richer for it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Eye-candy–wise, the film plants a big wet smooch; everything else about this happily-ever-after tale, however, feels like a mere air-kiss.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    For those of us who’ve been fans of Dequenne since her role as a blanc-trash Belgian waif in "Rosetta" (1999), her subtle portrayal of the pathological perpetrator proves that she’s monumentally talented.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Once the sharp, clever satire gives way to what feels like a special must-see-TV episode, the movie’s promise slowly deflates.

Top Trailers