For 516 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 77% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Fear's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Mauvais Sang
Lowest review score: 20 Loosies
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 34 out of 516
516 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    The film’s tendency to wax sentimental occasionally undermines its authority, but you won’t find better behind-the-scenes looks at the era’s mouse-eared power struggles or at the making of modern Disney classics.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    The ugly Americanism gets piled on thick - racists, dickwads and ignoramuses, oh my! - but there's a melancholy to this indie's cross-cultural explorations and communication breakdowns that compensates for the broader swipes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    The film never finds the right mix of the epic and the intimate - the personal as seen through the 20th century's Euro-geopolitical turmoil - that it aims for.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    There's too much beauty and ballast in the movie's early stages to dismiss Ceylan's cerebral cop drama, and too much genuine banality in its latter acts to justify a sluggish slouch into the shallow end.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    If you see only one Sono film, check out this flick; you will have then seen them all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    If Last Ride leans heavily on fugitive-life lyricism, it benefits from an incredible father-son chemistry between Weaving and Russell-one that makes the movie's inexorable drive toward tragedy that much more gut-wrenching.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    At its best, Outrage offers a meat-and-potatoes look at an age when battles of honor and humanity are AWOL in yakuza society. As things wind toward the inevitable hierarchical breakdown, however, the movie too often resembles a repetitive cycle of tough guys shouting, shooting and shuffling off this mortal coil.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    As a chronicle of grief and passion, however, the film is perilously close to being an exercise in tactile but touchy-feely passive-aggression.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Gibson simply turns his signature righteous rage into a crushing inward sorrow-Sad Max?-and Foster boldly plays everything straight, rendering her actor's unnerving turn to mania (and a pitch-black third act) with zero tongue-in-cheek.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    The combination of provincial accents and Stormare's patented creepiness make "Fargo" comparisons inevitable, though Canadian filmmaker Ed Gass-Donnelly's tongue isn't anywhere near his cheek.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Watching the elder statesman spin ring-a-ding wisdom is one thing; witnessing his generosity to another artist who couldn't handle her own talent, however, speaks volumes about what actually lurks under his placid, seemingly imperturbable surface.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Once the murderer starts relying on the lad’s kindness, all the preceding kid stuff starts to take on a purposefully sour tang.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    You just wish the moviemaking were as consistently graceful and momentum-fixated as the film's rail-grinding subjects.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    The gorgeous cinematography and generosity to Plummer’s emotive gifts almost make up for the mumbo-jumboness of it all. Almost.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    The result may occasionally be more of a journalistic scrapbook than a Wisemanian all-points portrait, but the impact of seeing such unvarnished public activism in the raw can't be overestimated.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Guerrero's handling of the bond between these two teens feels too coy by half; the film thankfully resists being either a typical coming-out movie or an ethnocultural curio, but it doesn't offer much insight into the twosome's attraction, platonic or otherwise, to each other.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Ignore the documentary's regrettable low-rent look and that kitschy "Love, American Style" soundtrack, and just focus on how this portrait turns a work of art into a sociological flash point.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 David Fear
    Was this eventual big-screen take on Shakur going to be an epic look at a complicated legend's life and times – a Gandhi of gangsta rap iconography – or merely a slightly larger Lifetime TV movie filled with hysterics and greatest-hits moments. We now have an answer. It was not the one we wanted.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Fear
    Alas, this isn't the Trump-trolling toon you're looking for. People may search for protest art hidden among the potty jokes, but the closest they're going to get to a subtextual statement is the Beatles' "Blackbird" on the soundtrack – and that's been repurposed as a lullaby.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Set mostly in modern-day Shanghai and involving two other girlfriends (also Li and Jun), this parallel plot feels less like an attempt to broaden the book's horizons than to cash in on "Joy's" cross-generational appeal while doubling down on cheap-shot melodrama.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Dog Pound only rarely finds the live-wire energy needed to make up for its amateur cast and staunch adherence to well-worn archetypes: cell-block bullies, sadistic guards, fresh-fish innocents, etc. Neither the film’s bark nor its bite leaves much of a mark.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    By the end of the ride, the movie’s messy humanity has officially calcified into After-School Special clichés; given the choice between handcrafted whimsy and heavy-handedness, we’ll take the former, thanks.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    While Fischer handles every emotional curveball, she's not helped by the film's reliance on rote notions of piecing your life back together. Is it worth putting a good actor through the screen-martyrdom wringer for a minuscule payoff?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    We know how these bargains turn out, so all we're left to do is watch pretentious exchanges about grief pile up, laugh at the way the movie exploits its Indian-girl-as-innocence-personified notion and wish that Eddie Marsan's giddy cameo as Hell's personal weapons dealer were much, much longer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    While Bier doesn't offer easy partisan answers, she still dilutes a social issue down to the level of soap-operatic background noise and back-patting platitudes. It-and we-deserve better.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    All Turbo does is give Reynolds, Paul Giamatti, Samuel L. Jackson and Snoop Dogg the easiest paychecks they’ll ever make, and its corporate overlords the chance to sell a few toys.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    The closer this parable inches toward tragedy, the more you can feel the gap between good intentions and generic exotica-grandstanding widening into an unbridgeable chasm.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    But while you can’t fault this labor of love’s conception, you can take issue with its leaden execution.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    The disparity only makes Reeves's earnest-but-monotonous turn that much more pronounced-and the film that much more dismissible.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    An adaptation of Mike Batistick's Off Broadway play, this stagy character study about immigrants living off the crumbs of the American Dream revels in cut-rate street smartness. Then comes the third act, at which point the film moves from obvious message-mongering to the beating of a post–9/11 dead horse.

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