For 63 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Hughes' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Still Alice
Lowest review score: 40 Season of the Witch
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 63
  2. Negative: 0 out of 63
63 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 David Hughes
    Prepare to be shocked, disturbed, awed... and, if you expected justice to prevail at last, ultimately devastated.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 David Hughes
    Michael Haneke's Palme D'Or winner is uncomfortable, uncompromising, unflinching... and utterly unmissable. Old age may not be a reality you wish to confront, but you must see this film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 David Hughes
    Julianne Moore gives the performance of her career (no mean feat, given the strength of her previous work) in this heartbreaking yet life-affirming tale of a woman determined to hold onto her identity while under attack from a debilitating mental disease.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 David Hughes
    Insightful, revelatory and profound, Moreh's Oscar-nominated documentary combines riveting interviews, archive footage and - yes - state-of-the-art photographic effects to offer a unique perspective on the Israel-Palestine issue.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    July's second film, while not quite as perfectly realised as her debut, nimbly avoids the 'sophomore slump', providing the curious with another window into her highly idiosyncratic world.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Ida
    Pawlikowski has a photographer’s eye for composition, and every crisp, monochrome frame could be a postcard from Poland’s tragic, turbulent past.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    It's hard to imagine that the prodigiously gifted Dolan is still in his early twenties. This is another work of marvellous maturity and assurance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Sarah Polley's second film is a masterfully painted portrait of an ordinary marriage under threat, dominated by a central performance of exquisite subtlety and observation.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    With his fourth film as writer-director, Judd Apatow has arguably made his most personal film yet, without forgetting to make us laugh.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Recalling Harvey Keitel’s tortured cop in Ferrara’s Bad Lieutenant, Devereaux is an unreconstructed, unrepentant monster with no hope of, or interest in, redemption. It’s a fearless, heroic performance in a provocative, important film. [Unrated Version]
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Six years after "Little Miss Sunshine," Dayton and Faris deliver a comedy that sparkles with wit and substance. But from the script to her portrayal of the title character, Ruby Sparks belongs to Zoe Kazan, who joins the likes of Sarah Polley and Brit Marling in the rarified ranks of actress/screenwriter double-threats.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Christophe Honoré goes epic in a tale of interlocking lives that owes a debt to Jacques Demy. It won't be to everyone's taste but it's playful enough to win us over.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    A eye-popping visual treat and a journey into the creative spirit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    While it doesn’t defy genre conventions like "Cabin In The Woods," Wingard’s tale of a dysfunctional family under siege is an outrageously entertaining crowd-pleaser — if you have the stomach for it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    An indie with real pedigree and smarts, Holofcener's comedy of manners is well-observered and well worth watching.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    A brittle black comedy that has plenty to say about modern manhood and the human survival instinct.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Mainstream audiences may find this too oddball to appreciate as a straight thriller. But tune into its strange frequency and there is much to enjoy — perhaps even adore.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    The Duplass brothers enter the mainstream with a touching, original and supremely funny film, whose improvisational style sets it apart from other comedies, and marks the emergence of two major new talents. Great performances, too.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    With a debut film, Katalin Varga, shot entirely in Hungarian, Strickland isn't one for the easy option. This excellent follow-up plunges into equally unusual terrain with similarly pleasing results
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Although the monochrome photography will invite comparisons with Manhattan, Frances Ha is closer in spirit to Godard than Woody Allen. Anchored by a charming performance from Greta Gerwig, it’s as light and breezy as a walk in Central Park, and just as refreshing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Even Oedipus would be left scratching his head by this bonkers but drily funny tale of one family's forlorn search for normality.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    A loopy joy from start to finish, Bradley Cooper proves that he's the real deal.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Unlucky to miss out a Best Foreign Film Oscar, this moving war flick is a nerve-jangling odyssey into the underground world.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Joe
    An understated Nicolas Cage — there’s a phrase you don’t get to write too often these days — anchors a superbly realised film, which, like its eponymous hero, has a brittle outer shell concealing a surprisingly warm heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Beautifully performed and tough as nails, Vinterberg's social drama could not be any more timely.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Given the obvious influences on The Double, it could have felt like a facsimile of other films. Instead, it has enough individuality, imagination and idiosyncratic invention to identify it as a true original.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    If Chris Morris had grown up in Sweden watching Jacques Tati and Ingmar Bergman films, he might be making films like this. Based on Andersson’s mordantly funny observations about the human condition, the pigeon has it pretty good.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Powerful, moving and melancholy. A low-key treat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    An extremely interesting insight, proving that rap music is an art form in its own right.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Fifty years after he first appeared, Donald E. Westlake’s antihero may have found his perfect avatar. Like Parker’s robberies, it isn’t entirely successful, but Statham and Lopez make enticingly mismatched partners in crime.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Chilean writer-director Sebastián Silva’s neither-fish-nor-fowl narrative plays tricks on our minds, without fully engaging our senses.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Often funny, outrageously vulgar in places and very, very French.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    If weapons and wizardry get your blood up, and you prefer your movies dark and brooding and minus the sandals, Solomon Kane fits the bill. It may lack The Lord Of The Rings' majesty, but Robert E. Howard fans will lap it up.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Whether or not the metaphorical aspects excite you, an unshakeable tolerance for high camp and lowbrow humour may be required to fully appreciate Almodóvar’s broad, bawdy comedy — even for fans of his early, funny films.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Moving if low-key, Jim Loach's debut feature is proof that compassionate, socially conscious filmmaking runs in the family.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Funny, whimsical and as warming as a big bowl of Irish stew.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Your opinion of this unasked-for but likable comedy sequel depends entirely on whether your reaction to the statement “It’s better than the first one” is 1) “Dear God, it could hardly be worse” or 2) “Awesome!”
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Another bravura performance from Juliette Binoche glosses over the flaws in a soft-focused glimpse at the seamier side of student life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Weir couldn't make a boring film if his life depended on it, and for any other director The Way Back would be laudable. It's good, but from this director we have come to expect great.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Polanski’s unavoidably stagy adaptation of David Ives’ celebrated Broadway play is an enjoyably witty two-hander, confined to its theatre setting, yet with much to say about gender roles in the world beyond.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Far from the giant mess you’d expect from the delayed release, late title change and a production history as muddled as the source material, Singer’s tall tale is snatched from disaster by an all-hell-breaks-loose third act.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Better than "The Transporter" but not as much fun as "Crank".
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Gregg Araki's sci-fi is a weird and, just occasionally, wonderful skew on the college comedy. Slight but fun.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Taymor's winningly cast, imaginative take on Shakespeare passes the test of bringing the Bard to film. It may also be the only PG Disney film to contain the word "F---".
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    The ever-versatile Winterbottom's loose and limber adaptation doesn't entirely mesh with Hardy's more formal narrative, leaving this feeling disjointed and underpowered. Nevertheless, there's still plenty to enjoy in the director's customary flourishes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    There's undoubtedly comedy mileage in an irreverent sending up of the Signs/Magnolia school of everything-is-connected philosophy. Despite the calibre of the cast, the Duplass brothers mostly fail to find it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    A musical with almost 100% sung verse is not for everyone but Kendrick is as bewitching as ever.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Reinforcing the very rom-com tropes it's sending up, this is a little too postmodern for its own good. Happily, Poehler and Rudd are as irresistible as ever.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    If TV had a Saga Channel, this intriguing, if never quite gripping, serial killer thriller would play on a loop, in between reruns of Matlock and NCIS.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Schnabel doesn't comes close to the quiet power of his last feature, "The Diving Bell And The Butterfly," delivering a story that can't match the scope or scale of Rula Jebreal's source material.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Totally crackers but it gets powered by pure invention and eccentricity alone.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    A nasty little chiller from the Saw director with the evergreen De Mornay on top form.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    A documentary of two halves, Gibney's character study of Armstrong is tough and forensic. But whether through a lingering admiration or the film's origins as a straightforward celebration of the cyclist's talents, there are moments when its powder remains a little dryer than perhaps it should.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    It's a surprise to see Wim Wenders embracing 3D in its full, feature-length glory but the medium works well to capture the graceful swirl of the German choreographer's work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Walker was Oscar nominated for Waste Land this year, and while this occasionally unfocused doc doesn't hit those heights, it's still a valuable and scary film that should be seen.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    It's gratifying to see Butler giving a proper acting role the old college try. Despite his best efforts, Forster's film, while pulling no punches, still somehow manages to miss the mark.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 David Hughes
    Does to the medieval era what Cage's Wicker Man did to Anthony Shaffer. Hokum and not in a good way.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 David Hughes
    A desire to Know What You Did Last Installment is likely to be the biggest draw for Scream number four, but if this proves to be the last in the series, it's a bloody shame it ended not with a Scream but a whimper.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 David Hughes
    Another shake-and-bake Stath special, boasting the requisite punchy-fighty action and some pleasing sleaziness from Franco and Bosworth, but it's ponderously handled by director Fleder.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 David Hughes
    Good fun, but O'Nan doesn't take this film nearly as far as it could go, leaving the plot and its characters somewhat two-dimensional in their obvious stereotyping.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 David Hughes
    Newcomers will be puzzled by the clumsy contextualisation and muddled motivation of characters who, robbed of their inner lives by a clunky script, are left floundering amid the melodrama and speak-the-plot dialogue.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 David Hughes
    If this ‘power corrupts’ potboiler had been made in the 1990s — with, say, Andy Garcia, Gene Hackman and Kim Basinger — it would already have felt old-fashioned. Forget it, Jake, it’s no "Chinatown."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 David Hughes
    Intermittently funny but erratically structured, it's a rare disappointment from Shelton.

Top Trailers