For 74 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Sims' Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 O.J.: Made in America
Lowest review score: 0 Wicked City: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 47 out of 74
  2. Negative: 5 out of 74
74 tv reviews
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 David Sims
    O.J.: Made in America is somehow even more engrossing than its fictionalized counterpart, meticulously fleshing out not only the details of the trial, but also the larger stories of race, celebrity, and misogyny that intersected around Simpson. ... Some of the most compelling television of the year.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 David Sims
    The audience knows the truth, but The Americans’s showrunner, Joe Weisberg, mines exquisite drama from the intricacies of each lie being told, as all of the show’s alliances continue to teeter on the brink of disaster.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 David Sims
    American Crime Story: The People vs. O.J. Simpson understands the nuances of the moment it’s examining, and its critical bearing on issues still playing out in culture today. It might be the best thing that’s ever aired with Murphy’s name on it, and it’s one of the most compelling TV dramas in recent memory.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 David Sims
    Rae’s triumph on Insecure is in making a smart, funny show about issues both universal and specific. It’s a brilliant commentary on love and friendship that manages to bring a fresh vision to the table, and that by itself feels quietly revolutionary.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 David Sims
    Sleepy Hollow works because it approaches everything with a relatively straight face, yet never seems to be taking itself too seriously.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 David Sims
    If the second episode can build even more on the insanity of the first, then Rick And Morty has the potential to be a versatile, entertaining comedy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 David Sims
    If this strong start is anything to go by, the show is going to produce an interesting, challenging, and hilarious batch of episodes for its fifth season. That’s reason enough to rejoice for now.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 David Sims
    The show is getting rebooted for its fifth season, and it’s quickly clear what a good idea that is.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Bojack continues to inventively satirize its own industry, while deepening the anguish of its main cast, and building out its surreal, animated world in ways that dazzlingly reflect our own.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Silicon Valley remains one of the funniest, darkest, smartest shows about the attraction, and limitations, of the American Dream, but by resetting itself, it also manages to stay strangely gripping.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    While Louie is often aggressively dreamlike, Master of None feels like a perfect distillation of Ansari’s best comedy. It picks apart the social conventions of his generation, ponders the insidiousness of racism and sexism in entertainment, and obsesses over his inability to form romantic connections--a smart comedy of manners that has more in common with Seinfeld than its contemporaries.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Catastrophe offers much to laugh at; it is perhaps one of the most cleverly and subtly written sitcoms currently on offer.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Daly’s tightly wound performance is so pitch-perfect, and the world around him so meticulously crafted, that the show works almost as well as a drama as it does as a comedy. Its final episodes are particularly loaded with gripping twists and turns.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    The Carmichael Show is back for a longer season, and it hasn’t lost a step--it’s still one of the most audacious comedies currently airing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    High Maintenance could easily have lost the transmutability that made it so special. Instead, it’s gotten better: The emotions run even deeper, the comedy is more self-aware, and The Guy’s ensemble of customers are more richly characterized.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Better Things is its own beguiling blend of sitcom moments and true-to-life frustration.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Every one-liner felt honed and briskly funny (describing Donald Trump as a “human caps lock”), and throughout, Bee exuded the quiet confidence that makes her a natural for this gig. Yes, it’s great to have a woman in the late-night fray; it’s also great to have someone who knows what she’s doing. If Full Frontal continues with the format it debuted this week, it’ll quickly become appointment TV for the political-comedy crowd.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Jessica Jones stands by itself as a fascinating work of TV, and represents the evolutionary leap Marvel has been waiting to take in terms of telling a wider variety of stories. You can enjoy it without knowing a thing about any other comic-book title, on the page or on the screen, and that’s just about the highest praise one can bestow on a Marvel property.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    One Mississippi is true to her [Tig Notaro's] personality as a performer: It explores painful topics, but with intense empathy for both its characters and its viewers, as if holding their hands through its toughest moments.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    If the show has flaws--it’s certainly slow-moving, and the intentional abrasiveness of its characters can sometimes feel cartoonish--they deserve to be forgiven just because of the singularity of vision on display.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Overall, Supergirl is visually impressive (the special-effects budget can’t have been small), and it has just the right amount of self-awareness.... With CBS’s slick production and Benoist’s likable performance, [it] makes Supergirl an easy show to cheer for.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    A Year in the Life won’t necessarily convert new viewers—like any revival, it’s making a play for a loyal fanbase, which should be more than enough to justify Netflix’s investment in the show. But as a salvage attempt after Gilmore Girls’ original bittersweet ending, it feels wholly justified.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    It’s a laugh-out-loud sitcom that nonetheless strives to investigate its storylines on deeper metaphysical grounds.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Season two pushes things in even more metatextual directions, largely to good ends.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Fear the Walking Dead’s second season manages to maintain the great momentum of the first, even as it transitions to a new arc. It’s also much more fun than it sounds (even though half of the cast is made up of angsty teenagers), as the show takes typical story tropes and manages to smoothly mix them with zombie-horror adventures.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Even viewers unfamiliar with the original works being parodied will find plenty to enjoy, but the show’s chief draw is undoubtedly tied to its source material. Every mini-movie has a strange humanity to it, looking to echo the heart of the subject, as well as the style.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The show’s star Maria Bamford and its co-creators Mitch Hurwitz and Pam Brady have taken that well-worn formula and turned it into a uniquely bizarre comedy for Netflix--one that manages to tap into dark, emotional territory while remaining a cheerful, unconventional delight.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The Crown is sometimes too somber, and slow-moving to a fault (it intends to cover Elizabeth’s entire reign over six seasons). But if you’re looking for an immersive history lesson with all the royal trimmings (ermine and purple velvet among them), it’s an extremely engrossing watch.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Preacher’s going for gross and, with its tongue planted firmly in cheek, it doesn’t shy away from the wise-cracking, pulpy excitement of its genre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Five Came Back is, in the end, a compelling examination of propaganda--its purpose, its effectiveness, and its drawbacks.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The show’s fifth season is still sharp, well-plotted, and peppered with laugh-out-loud moments of obscenity. But like so much current satire—from SNL to The Daily Show to Scandal’s Donald Trump analogue--it’s struggling to match the unpredictable political pulse of the moment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    It’s an impressive return--and a further indication that the hour-long comedy special is an art form with plenty of life left in it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    On a macro-scale, the series is absorbing, but it takes a few episodes to settle into the smaller stories that are unfolding.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    While Baskets is an acidic, sometimes depressing watch, it’s much better than that sounds--an incisive, absurd, darkly heartfelt show set not on the stage but in America’s dreary urban sprawl.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Like other excellent half-hour dramedies about the pains of growing up and settling down (Girls, You’re the Worst), Love is at its best when it digs deeper into its protagonists’ biggest (and most repelling) flaws.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 David Sims
    Fred Armisen is a surprising choice as bandleader, but he brings unequaled improv chops to the table, and his little banter with Seth every night has already proven one of the more reliably funny bits. Integrating him as much as possible is certainly a smart idea. Meyers, like Fallon, is also a more-than-capable interviewer.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 David Sims
    Baldwin and Toback’s bloviating can grate, and the whole project comes across as pretty frivolous when all is said and done. But for film buffs with an interest in the frustrating business side of things, it’s a rare glimpse into a crucial part of the moviemaking industry.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    This is a show dealing with darker issues than its network brethren, but presented in the same bouncy, upbeat style. It’s a weird clash of styles that shouldn’t really work, but somehow does.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Despite its languid narrative style, Luke Cage is doing many fascinating things. Its mood and visual aesthetic are as well-honed as the perfectly bleak Jessica Jones; its action scenes, when they arrive, are brutal and swift; and its lead performers are uniformly terrific, most of all Mike Colter as Cage, who wrings endless charisma from his character’s resolute stoicism.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    The Daily Show with Trevor Noah wasn’t without its foibles and clunky one-liners: the pitfalls any new late-night talk show has to dodge. But the biggest takeaway from Noah’s first swing at succeeding Jon Stewart was the new host’s energy and exuberant confidence--something most take weeks, if not months, to find.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Westworld is a slow start, and a slightly frustrating one; after four episodes, it feels like it’s just begun to probe deeper into its own high concept. The sequences inside the control room are fascinating, but the dialogue is often circular, swerving away from simple exposition into loftier ethical discussions.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    The problem is that Kirkman’s unexpected rise to power is just a little too grim to make that outcome worth fully celebrating. ... There’s no question that the political side of Designated Survivor is the more fascinating one, but there’s something clever about a network show combining the day-to-day concerns of The West Wing with the paranoid conspiracies of Homeland.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    He delivered the entire package with a feeling of genuine delight, which was enough to carry the audience through all the first-show jitters--an achievement none of Colbert’s competitors could claim.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    As played by the relative newcomer Kylie Bunbury, Ginny is a delightfully flinty and occasionally nervy champ to root for, and she helps Pitch’s pilot episode overcome some of its biggest clichés through sheer charm, even if the show’s long-term future is murkier.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    The Characters is worth checking out too, because unlike Party Over Here, its comedic voice is immediately distinct. Every episode is devoted to the idiosyncrasies of its host.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Don’t be discouraged by the utter incoherence of the first hour: The spirit of the show is still here, waiting to be drawn out, and each installment is better than the last.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Ridley should be applauded for creating an involving world from the ground up so quickly without ever relying on stereotype. But American Crime still feels academic and inert at times.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    The result is a mixed bag, but one that--like the magazine--offers the opportunity to pick and choose as you go.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    Outside of Affleck’s strangely compelling Tom Brady tirade, Any Given Wednesday’s pilot was almost aggressively chill--a pleasantly meandering antidote to the usual hot-take cauldron of sports TV.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    Though they’re wildly different shows, the strengths and weaknesses of Chappelle’s comedy comeback are consistent in each.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    Though they’re wildly different shows, the strengths and weaknesses of Chappelle’s comedy comeback are consistent in each.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    Perhaps once the exposition is disposed of, it’ll pick up speed (the second episode, which also airs Monday, is a little better than the first). But to succeed, the show needs to more fully explore the complex and often terrifying world it introduces, tropes and all.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    Ferrell Takes the Field, meanwhile, finds a middle ground: It’s short on big laughs, but admirable nonetheless for Ferrell’s ability to disappear into his characters.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    Chelsea may be off to a shaky start, but for those who want to wait for the show to find its feet before checking out some episodes, there should be an interesting backlog of segments in a few weeks. It might not exactly overhaul the late-night format, but few shows are in a better position to do so.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    Stevens (probably best known as the handsome heir of Downton Abbey) is doing fine work at the center of all this, holding the camera’s focus even when Hawley’s dialogue feels like it’s going nowhere.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, Chicago Med marks yet another routine entry and doggedly follows the same beats as its forbears, most notably the Chicago-set ER.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    Inside Amy Schumer has returned with the same blend of gross-out humor, wryly subversive musical numbers, and bluntly graphic man-on-the-street interviews, but its star’s growing celebrity has undeniably robbed the show of much of its edge.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    The premiere of Best Time Ever was a truly chaotic series of stunts, and enjoyment of it probably derives from just how staged you thought the audience interaction was. Either way, at a certain point it had a manic energy no other variety show of recent decades has come close to capturing, and that in itself is a strange sort of achievement.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    [Richard Dreyfuss] plays Madoff with the exact mix of charm, chutzpah, and extreme denial you would hope for from the notorious fraudster. Madoff is undeniably compelling in the ways it gives its audience the thrill of watching someone flagrantly break the law. But in the end it feels too puffy and cute.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    Its first episode had the typical ups and downs of a late-night debut.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    There’s an itchy feeling of familiarity to Back In The Game.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Sims
    Son of Zorn does well to avoid the argument that something has been lost in this new, progressive world--Zorn is very much a buffoon from start to finish--but the gag has nonetheless started to wear thin by the end of the first episode’s 22 minutes.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 42 David Sims
    If Ironside becomes a serialized fantasy drama exploring the mystery behind the fountain of youth, which Underwood must have discovered, then it will definitely be worth watching. Otherwise, it’s eminently skippable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 42 David Sims
    Mixology has a big enough ensemble that it can present the dating game from multiple angles, but almost all of the angles it picks are stale and predictable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 David Sims
    Like many CBS dramas, Limitless is made with aggressive competence.... But there’s a depressing lack of originality to Limitless, which quickly positions itself as a dull cop show despite its wackier sci-fi origins.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 David Sims
    As long as you accept that The Muppets will never quite reach the heights of its forebears, there’s still plenty of room for the show to grow from its trudging pilot.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 David Sims
    Heroes Reborn would have to do something drastically different to distinguish itself in 2015, but all it seems to offer so far is more of the same.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 David Sims
    There’s a much more entertaining but less intensely violent show buried in Hand of God somewhere.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 David Sims
    Though it’s crisp-looking and well-cast like its predecessors, The Catch is mostly a flashy lot of nothing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 David Sims
    There may not have ever been a good show buried in all these misfiring elements, but even so, Hollands has picked a poor way to tell his story. As his characters trip and stumble toward an obvious conclusion, what should be an epic event series feels like a chore.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 David Sims
    Time Traveling Bong is as silly as it sounds and makes little sense as a television event, much less one intended to celebrate the subversive joys of weed.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 David Sims
    This is a hilariously staid, old-school, laugh-track sitcom about a man whose only purpose is to grit his teeth and gripe about young people. It’d be funny, if it weren’t so, well, unfunny--hokey stereotypes just don’t make for compelling comedy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 David Sims
    Maya & Marty feels like reheated leftovers rather than something that could demand popular attention every week.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 0 David Sims
    Wicked City feels especially egregious. It’s a desperate play to be a dark, adults-only story that comes off instead as purely childish. Wicked City is, in short, gross.

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