For 74 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Sims' Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 O.J.: Made in America
Lowest review score: 0 Wicked City: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 47 out of 74
  2. Negative: 5 out of 74
74 tv reviews
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 David Sims
    O.J.: Made in America is somehow even more engrossing than its fictionalized counterpart, meticulously fleshing out not only the details of the trial, but also the larger stories of race, celebrity, and misogyny that intersected around Simpson. ... Some of the most compelling television of the year.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 David Sims
    The audience knows the truth, but The Americans’s showrunner, Joe Weisberg, mines exquisite drama from the intricacies of each lie being told, as all of the show’s alliances continue to teeter on the brink of disaster.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 David Sims
    American Crime Story: The People vs. O.J. Simpson understands the nuances of the moment it’s examining, and its critical bearing on issues still playing out in culture today. It might be the best thing that’s ever aired with Murphy’s name on it, and it’s one of the most compelling TV dramas in recent memory.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 David Sims
    Rae’s triumph on Insecure is in making a smart, funny show about issues both universal and specific. It’s a brilliant commentary on love and friendship that manages to bring a fresh vision to the table, and that by itself feels quietly revolutionary.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 David Sims
    Sleepy Hollow works because it approaches everything with a relatively straight face, yet never seems to be taking itself too seriously.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 David Sims
    If the second episode can build even more on the insanity of the first, then Rick And Morty has the potential to be a versatile, entertaining comedy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 David Sims
    If this strong start is anything to go by, the show is going to produce an interesting, challenging, and hilarious batch of episodes for its fifth season. That’s reason enough to rejoice for now.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 David Sims
    The show is getting rebooted for its fifth season, and it’s quickly clear what a good idea that is.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Bojack continues to inventively satirize its own industry, while deepening the anguish of its main cast, and building out its surreal, animated world in ways that dazzlingly reflect our own.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Silicon Valley remains one of the funniest, darkest, smartest shows about the attraction, and limitations, of the American Dream, but by resetting itself, it also manages to stay strangely gripping.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    While Louie is often aggressively dreamlike, Master of None feels like a perfect distillation of Ansari’s best comedy. It picks apart the social conventions of his generation, ponders the insidiousness of racism and sexism in entertainment, and obsesses over his inability to form romantic connections--a smart comedy of manners that has more in common with Seinfeld than its contemporaries.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Catastrophe offers much to laugh at; it is perhaps one of the most cleverly and subtly written sitcoms currently on offer.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Daly’s tightly wound performance is so pitch-perfect, and the world around him so meticulously crafted, that the show works almost as well as a drama as it does as a comedy. Its final episodes are particularly loaded with gripping twists and turns.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    The Carmichael Show is back for a longer season, and it hasn’t lost a step--it’s still one of the most audacious comedies currently airing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    High Maintenance could easily have lost the transmutability that made it so special. Instead, it’s gotten better: The emotions run even deeper, the comedy is more self-aware, and The Guy’s ensemble of customers are more richly characterized.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Better Things is its own beguiling blend of sitcom moments and true-to-life frustration.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Every one-liner felt honed and briskly funny (describing Donald Trump as a “human caps lock”), and throughout, Bee exuded the quiet confidence that makes her a natural for this gig. Yes, it’s great to have a woman in the late-night fray; it’s also great to have someone who knows what she’s doing. If Full Frontal continues with the format it debuted this week, it’ll quickly become appointment TV for the political-comedy crowd.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Jessica Jones stands by itself as a fascinating work of TV, and represents the evolutionary leap Marvel has been waiting to take in terms of telling a wider variety of stories. You can enjoy it without knowing a thing about any other comic-book title, on the page or on the screen, and that’s just about the highest praise one can bestow on a Marvel property.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    One Mississippi is true to her [Tig Notaro's] personality as a performer: It explores painful topics, but with intense empathy for both its characters and its viewers, as if holding their hands through its toughest moments.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    If the show has flaws--it’s certainly slow-moving, and the intentional abrasiveness of its characters can sometimes feel cartoonish--they deserve to be forgiven just because of the singularity of vision on display.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Overall, Supergirl is visually impressive (the special-effects budget can’t have been small), and it has just the right amount of self-awareness.... With CBS’s slick production and Benoist’s likable performance, [it] makes Supergirl an easy show to cheer for.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    A Year in the Life won’t necessarily convert new viewers—like any revival, it’s making a play for a loyal fanbase, which should be more than enough to justify Netflix’s investment in the show. But as a salvage attempt after Gilmore Girls’ original bittersweet ending, it feels wholly justified.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    It’s a laugh-out-loud sitcom that nonetheless strives to investigate its storylines on deeper metaphysical grounds.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Season two pushes things in even more metatextual directions, largely to good ends.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Fear the Walking Dead’s second season manages to maintain the great momentum of the first, even as it transitions to a new arc. It’s also much more fun than it sounds (even though half of the cast is made up of angsty teenagers), as the show takes typical story tropes and manages to smoothly mix them with zombie-horror adventures.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Even viewers unfamiliar with the original works being parodied will find plenty to enjoy, but the show’s chief draw is undoubtedly tied to its source material. Every mini-movie has a strange humanity to it, looking to echo the heart of the subject, as well as the style.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The show’s star Maria Bamford and its co-creators Mitch Hurwitz and Pam Brady have taken that well-worn formula and turned it into a uniquely bizarre comedy for Netflix--one that manages to tap into dark, emotional territory while remaining a cheerful, unconventional delight.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The Crown is sometimes too somber, and slow-moving to a fault (it intends to cover Elizabeth’s entire reign over six seasons). But if you’re looking for an immersive history lesson with all the royal trimmings (ermine and purple velvet among them), it’s an extremely engrossing watch.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Preacher’s going for gross and, with its tongue planted firmly in cheek, it doesn’t shy away from the wise-cracking, pulpy excitement of its genre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Five Came Back is, in the end, a compelling examination of propaganda--its purpose, its effectiveness, and its drawbacks.

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